Lexan Refinishing. - Page 8 - Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums

 12Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #71 of 77 (permalink) Old 05-16-2019, 12:53 PM
Senior Member
 
William_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Tampico, , Mexico
Year: 1999
Make: Honda
Model: GL1500 Aspencade
Posts: 4,379
Garage
For safety reasons i think you should toss them away and get a new one.

sanding polishing its a pita, using wax and other compounds may work temporarily but if you get caught in the rain i would be very afraid of it washing out leaving you with a hard to see trough windshield PLUS rain water. thats a recipe for disaster.
AZgl1800 likes this.
William_86 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #72 of 77 (permalink) Old 05-17-2019, 12:44 PM
Senior Member
 
CrystalPistol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Fairfield, Virginia, USA
Model: 1997 GL1500SE/Lehman GTL Trike
Posts: 3,182
Garage
My '85's OEM W shield was a hardcoated Lexan, but the hard coating had peeled in places. I polished it all over, but the hard coated parts looked very different from those places where coating was missing. I trashed it soon afterwards, went with Slip streamer wrap around. Did not like distraction of "blotches" of just polished Lexan.

.
.
.
1997 GL-1500 SE / 1998 Lehman GTL Trike
...(Candy Spectra Red )

"Make Courtesy Your Code of the Road!"
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
CrystalPistol is offline  
post #73 of 77 (permalink) Old 05-18-2019, 06:56 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: NY and FL
Year: 78, 86, 02, 03
Make: Honda GW's
Posts: 25
Many years ago I removed the hard coat from my 86 with polishing compound, then used rubbing compound and then a finer compound like Mothers. Now I just use an occasional wax with/cleaner to re-polish it. Yeah, it was a lot of work but it's kinda neat to have the original shield and it works fine.
OldAge is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #74 of 77 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 08:27 AM
Senior Member
 
Kyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Model: 2010
Posts: 1,864
Garage
I made the mistake of doing the raindance. stripped off a lot of the coating, and can't get it uniform again with regular polishing, and I'm not into sanding it or other harsh chemicals. No issue seeing through it, just has kind of a cosmetic splotchy look depending on how the light hits it.

2010 That is Black and has a Black Trailer on the Back.
2003 That is the fastest Red I've ever seen
Riding a 4 wheeler, 2 of them are on the trailer
My hair is white, my neck is red, my collar is blue.
Darkside #1721
2010 Rear-Bridgestone Driveguard 195/55R/16
2003 Rear-Goodyear Eagle Ultragrip 195/55R/16
Wild Rhino
Group of Ten (Those ten guys from Winnipeg)
AKA Wingerpeg

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Kyle is offline  
post #75 of 77 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 11:21 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: NY and FL
Year: 78, 86, 02, 03
Make: Honda GW's
Posts: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle View Post
I made the mistake of doing the raindance. stripped off a lot of the coating, and can't get it uniform again with regular polishing, and I'm not into sanding it or other harsh chemicals. No issue seeing through it, just has kind of a cosmetic splotchy look depending on how the light hits it.

I didn't do any sanding. I just used polishing compound which is coarser than rubbing compound. It took a little time but once the coating was off, the rubbing compound worked pretty good.
OldAge is offline  
post #76 of 77 (permalink) Old 05-28-2019, 06:32 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Denmark
Year: 1982
Make: Honda
Model: GL 1100 DX
Posts: 8
I restored an original '82 GL1100 windscreen last year. The hard layer pealed off easy. I used a polish mashine set on minimum speed (800rpm) and a thick 10" foam pad. I tried several compounds, but the one that worked best were some water based cutting compound called Farecla G3 (course) and G10 (fine). This is a polishing compound without chemicals or wax. The trick with using water based compounds is that you can keep the viscosity thin and constant by adding a little water as you progress with a spray bottle. It also helps with cooling so you don't risk burnmarks. Rinse the pad and the screen often during the process and reapply fresh polish, as any dust particles will leave scratches. Once you are happy with the result you can simply wash the compound off with water and perhaps a little dish wash soap.
The result was perfect, but I have to say that, as some one here mentioned, the Lexan is very soft. You can almost scratch it just by looking at it. I finished it off with a coat of hard wax and it seems to help a lot.
I dont think I would use any sanding paper at all even on deep scratches. It just takes a little longer with the polish machine, but eventually it will also remove the deeper ones.
It took about 4 hours of work to get it nice. Is it worth the it? sure, if you already have the materials as I did or if you want to keep your bike 100% original.
Gamli is offline  
post #77 of 77 (permalink) Old 05-31-2019, 08:53 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Charleston, South Carolina, USA
Posts: 1,423
Thing thing about using abrasives is the quality. If there is one 80 grit grain on your 120 paper, you have problems. Dont buy cheap abrasives. So says the guy who has a paint and body shop.


I use Super Assilex for my paint correction, and I use that same on polycarbonate.


Once the hard coat is cleared from your windscreen, I would suggest Super Assilex blue. then yellow, then green, then orange with a final pass of peach. Change directions with each grit so you can see the scratches from the previous grit disappear..Use it wet or dry, but be sure to dry and examine the scratch pattern before changing grades. Dry will be more difficult to see the changes; wipe it with a damp cloth and dry to inspect/



Final polishing with 3M Super Duty compound, followed by 3M Perfect-It.


Here is an Assilex assortment to get you started.
https://smile.amazon.com/Eagle-U191-...gateway&sr=8-4



Once the hard coat is gone,


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
ob1quixote is offline  
Reply

  Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums > Forums > Goldwing Technical Forum

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Making holes in lexan/plastic Chewman Goldwing Technical Forum 19 12-18-2017 08:20 PM
Windshields: Acrylic, Lexan, Lucite. Preference? Recycled Roadkill Goldwing Technical Forum 12 07-29-2014 11:02 AM
1/8" thick lexan...Can I use this thickness for a windshield on my '87 interstate? foreck Goldwing Technical Forum 17 10-23-2013 06:17 PM
heating and molding lexan desert wings General Motorcycle Discussion Forum 16 02-11-2012 07:29 PM
Refinishing Chimp General Motorcycle Discussion Forum 12 10-22-2008 10:34 AM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome