'85 Interstate refresh - Page 3 - Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums

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post #21 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
Restoration Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
4 Jan 2019

I finished up my craigslist rebuild on the exhaust, except I actually masked off the shiny bits before the spray paint. I had two M6 spiral taps so I ground one to a bottom tap and cleaned up the threads in the exhaust holding the chrome bits on, sprayed all the ugly with exhaust paint and put it all back together. My tires came so I spooned the rear tire on and balanced it, then reinstalled. Man, these fat tires on little rims are a pain. Also since this is a racewing, I threw a spare racing aluminum 90* valve stem in. Seriously, why don't every bike ever come with these from the factory?
Cleaned up threads in exhaust by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Exhaust drying after repaint by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
New rear tire installed on the balancing rig by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 11:55 AM.
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post #22 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
Restoration Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
4 Jan 2019

I ran a tap through all the threads in the exhaust and used antisieze on all the bolts. Had to drill out and replace one broken bolt on the front clamp. To get it to go on I once again summoned the power of ratchet straps and ran one down each side pulling the exhaust forward, and I just kept wiggling it a little then adding more tension. My electrical bits came in so I added the protective sleeve to the stator wires and connected them straight to the rectifier. Right now it's holding a steady 14.9v at almost all RPMs.
Using ratchet straps to pull exhaust back on by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Upper connections into stator/rectifier-regulator. by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 11:56 AM.
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post #23 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
4 Jan 2019

So when I first examined my project wing there was some less than optimal wiring, with multiple bits of wire, scotchlocks, posilocks, crimps, even wirenuts. The starter relay was the recipient of some of that, as shown. I immediately did a repair, which worked perfectly fine. But it didn't bring joy to my soul as the crazy people say, so I purchased the correct connector and redid it back to factory. I also have a line on an '86 parts bike for cheap money, which I'll hopefully be going to pick up Sunday. Apparently runs but doesn't charge the battery, so I'm assuming shot stator. Don't care, I'm swiping the carbs and anything else I feel may be useful. On the off chance the stator's fine and it's just the wiring then I may cut the parts bike in half and keep the engine for a future project.
Correct style connectors and crimper by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Factory style connector, final repair by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 11:57 AM.
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post #24 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
4 Jan 2019

The rear air shocks had a serious case of the oxides, so they needed love. The chrome was too far gone for polish. Once again, is there anything that can't involve a lathe to make it better? I pulled off the shock boot and chucked the shock in the lathe, set the carriage as if it was cutting a 10tpi thread and laid the grinder on it. Finished with a nice, level, toothy finish perfect to hold paint. Chucked it in my welding positioner and spun it with the drill, and added a couple coats of VHT caliper paint. Seriously, this stuff may be awesomer than the VHT Epoxy paint I usually use.
Rear shocks chrome totally gone by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Shock chucked in lathe by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Chrome removed to base metal using flap wheel in grinder by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Repainted by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 11:57 AM.
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post #25 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
5 Jan 2019

Drained and pulled the radiator, yanked the front covers and replaced the timing belts. Also turned some aluminum adapters, one of which I installed a Schrader valve in so I could pressure test the radiator. I grabbed a spare Honda hose clamp from a parts gl1k, sandblasted and painted it. Also drained the rear diff in preparation of refilling it, pain because the drain isn't the lowest spot so I sucked a bunch more out with my brake bleeder now I'm jamming shop towels in it to soak up the rest.
New timing belts by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Fresh oil in rear diff by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 11:58 AM.
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post #26 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
5 Jan 2019

The belt covers were ugly so I tried a few different finishes on them, and settles on a satin polish which I arrived at by sandblasting them then gently wirebrushing them with first a bench mounted wheel then a grinder with a worn out wire cup brush. They'll need regular cleaning and application of nevrdull but that's ok. I also filled the rear diff, reinstalled the shocks and hooked up their air lines.
Radiator removed, belt covers before polish by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 11:58 AM.
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post #27 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
5 Jan 2019

Pulled off the front wheel and started in on the forks. New seals, bushings were fine, new 15w fluid. The lower legs also had a case of the uglies so they got polished a bit. Rear shocks look so much better now.
Fork leg prior to clean and polish by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Front fork leg after clean and polish by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Rear shocks reinstalled, air lines reconnected by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
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Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 11:59 AM.
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post #28 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
6 Jan 2019

Picked up a running parts bike for small money. It's in pretty rough shape but it runs and has a good set of carbs, and for some reason a Jardine exhaust. I'll grab the bits I need, eBay enough to get my money back and junk the rest.

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 11:59 AM.
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post #29 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
6 Jan 2019

Rebuilt the other fork leg, cleaned and polished everything, reinstalled.
Front forks after polish and new seals/fluid by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Front back together by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 11:59 AM.
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post #30 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
11 Jan 2019

Swapped and balanced the front tire, which involved much cursing. Also added a racing 90* valve stem facing to the right, which would have been easy except that it was in my gear cabinet three bikes deep. Then polished up more stuff, reinstalled the front fender, wheel, and brakes. Replaced the boots on the TRAC system. Clay bar, cutting and polishing compound on the front fender, final polish and wax will happen when the whole bike's back together.
New tire, 90* valve stem, balanced by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Front put back together by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:00 PM.
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