'85 Interstate refresh - Page 7 - Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums

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post #61 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:57 AM Thread Starter
Restoration Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
25 Jan 2019

So I figured I'd go look at the parts bike and see if it's any better. Honestly, some people should be legally banned from holding anything sharper than a breadstick. The parts bike trunk reflector was more promising but once again had both scotchlocks and crappy crimp connectors*, incorrect lights and melted plastic. I'm not in favor of most government lists but I'd be in favor of the tracking and careful watching of anyone who uses scotchlocks. I cut all the wires, scabbed in wire where necessary and repaired everything using sealed heat-shrink crimps, all covered in self-vulcanizing rubber tape. Also in keeping with the parts bike theme two of the bolts holding it in were broken, one screw was missing and one was the wrong kind. At least it was designed to hold a pair of 1157 bulbs, as opposed to having them taped against the plastic.
*Edit: I forgot about the wire nuts! And the pieces of electrical tape covering the previously crushed wires!
Scotch locks, crimps, a wire nut, tape, scabbed in wiring by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Rusty socket by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Melted plastic by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Repaired. Sealed heat shrink crimps, self vulcanizing rubber tape. by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:15 PM.
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post #62 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:57 AM Thread Starter
Restoration Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
26 Jan 2019

It's always the little fussy stuff that takes forever. This morning I cleaned up and installed the other saddlebag, then figured I had enough wiring going on that I should check the brake lights. Running lights came on, but not the brake lights. Hmm. Much consternation, staring at the wiring diagram, and testing of things. Finally I pulled the wires off the front brake light switch and jumper them, aha! Lights come on. I grab the switch from the parts bike and it's totally rusted, so I drilled out the pins, took both switches apart, cleaned and lubed the gooder one and popped it back together. Now that works, why not the back brake? I disconnect it, test for continuity and it tests good. Then I jumper the pins in the connector on the bike side, lights come on. Huh? I ended up depinning the connectors, cleaning and tightening the contacts, and reassembled it and now all that works fine. Success! The LEDs I installed cause the Brake Failure light to come on, so when I redo all the bulbs in the dash I think I'll leave that one out. Then I start on the trunk, and start that with a complete disassembly. I don't like the rack to begin with, but the holes are already there so it stays for now. However, the trunk on the parts bike is shattered on top from the rack. It just bolts directly to the trunk lid, which is only a couple millimeters thick at that point. No bueno. So I grab the last of my extra special ABS glue, cut a couple 2.5" discs out of some 1/8" thick ABS sheet and laminate them in from the back, using random bolts and washers to hold them tight while it sets.
Rear brake light switch wires cleaned and tightened by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Front brake and clutch switches by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
ABS supports glued in for rack by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:15 PM.
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post #63 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:58 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
26 Jan 2019

Put the trunk back together and tucked the back end up. The rack was resting directly against the trunk, with no rubber washers like I expected. I took some plastic rivets and cut/drilled them into washers in their stead. For grins I also installed the seat just so I can see what it's supposed to look like. Monday/Tuesday I'll recover the seats. Today I should get the dash bulbs, so hopefully tomorrow I can buttoned back up and maybe sneak in a quick test ride.
Edit: this also involved throwing some heat shrink on the wiring harness for the trunk to repair the broken sleeving, cutting a new wiring channel in the bottom of the trunk, swiping parts back and forth between the parts bike and the keeper, etc.
Washers made from plastic rivets by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Rear reassembled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:15 PM.
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post #64 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:58 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
26 Jan 2019

Front end back together. How I would love to tell you of the trouble-free, easy reassembly. Alas, I was stupid many times and many ways. First off, I bought LEDs for the dash. They're polarity sensitive. I carefully jumpered each bulb, in white, red, green, and blue, to determine which side was negative. Then I disassembled the front of the bike to pull the dash out, which is rather time consuming. I checked the wiring diagram, verified that all bulbs share a common wire (ground) and then each have a color coded switched wire. I installed the bulbs, jumpered directly to the plug and verified their awesomeness. Reassembled the whole thing, lo and behold only a few work. I redisassemble, recheck, reassemble. No change. I check the diagram. Yup, common ground, switched hots. I play this game for an hour before I look, actually look, at the diagram. Wtf honda? In direct contradiction to everything everywhere forever, Honda decided that this dash should have a mostly common hot, and switch the negatives. But not for the turn signal indicators. Again all the things come off/out. Again, bulbs are checked. Fixed. Verified. I put it all back together. There was a significant, nonzero number of times I dropped one of the nuts inside the fairing. Had to chase it out with a magnet on a stick. New skill I developed, actually. Then I get it all together, I mean windscreen and everything, and realize I forgot the speedo cable. God hates me, and I shouldn't be working on the bike with 1.5 hours of sleep. Beer to the rescue! I get everything fixedish, back together, and verify that it starts and runs. Now I'm going to shoot zombies for a while. Fun fact, the low fuel sensor and low fuel light relay leak enough volts to slightly illuminate the low fuel LED even when it has a full tank of gas. Yes the bike is running in the pic, yes the haze in the background is from the bike. I'm currently running a combination of the 10 year old gas that was in it, the indeterminate age gas that was in the parts bike, and a gallon or so of summer 2018 vintage from my lawn mower supply.
Close to reassembly by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:16 PM.
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post #65 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:58 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
27 Jan 2019

Did a bit of fairing repair work, minor reassembly, and cleanup. Put the parts bike out back next to my son's cb650 to keep it company. Pulled the jardine exhaust off it first, lots of rework needed on that whether I keep it or sell it. Then I took the bike out for a quick test ride. Went pretty well, all things considered.
Good points:
I didn't die.
The bike didn't explode.
No parts that I saw fell off.

Challenges:
The brakes are entirely decorative, and do nothing towards slowing or stopping the bike. Pretty sure the pads are saturated with oil from the blown fork seals. I'll swipe the pads from the parts bike as a test, then order new ones if that fixes it.
There's a squeak from the front that sounds suspiciously like the belt tensioner, so I'll swipe those out of the parts bike and swap them out.
There's a rumble at certain speeds and throttle settings, I'm leaning more towards u-joint than engine. I'll check that out, plus put new plugs in it just because.
The speedo quit halfway through the ride, so I'm uncertain yet confident that at one point I reached 350mph. Gotta see what the issue is there.
I forgot how cold blooded old big bikes are, had to have the choke on much longer than I wanted. But that's just a thing with these bikes.
There was still a fair amount of ice on the road, which is challenging when you don't have brakes or know how fast you're going.

Still to do:
I have to take the front end apart again to fix the fuel light issue, and access the parts of the speedo that may have come loose. Still need to clay and polish the fairing. Still need to assemble the dash. Need to install the seat covers. Need to do one more drain and refill of coolant and oil. Need to make the brakes work.

After getting used to a Duke 390, an XB12X and XB12XT, moving this bike feels like piloting a heavily loaded barge in strong currents. Progress is awesome. So is fuel injection.
Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:16 PM.
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post #66 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:58 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
27 Jan 2019

More stuff did. My LEDs came in for the trunk bulbs, so those went in. Three screws, two machine screws and two nuts, plus an electrical connector. Thanks Honda. Another thing I transferred from the parts bike to mine were pieces of string. They hold the lids of the saddlebags so you can let them hang instead of trying to find a place to put them (they don't hinge, the come entirely off). Also in case there's anyone out there that doesn't know what a clay bar does for paint, check out the video on my Flickr page, with the sound up. The fender was clayed, the fairing just washed.
Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:17 PM.
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post #67 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:58 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
27 Jan 2019

Got the matching backrest cover, looks pretty nice and is a perfect match. Still waiting on the heating pads before I can install these. I also just verified that my current stapler doesn't have a chance of going through the seat base plastic, so I ordered a pneumatic stapler and some stainless staples.

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:17 PM.
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post #68 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:59 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
28 Jan 2019

Today was mostly cleanup but some work was done. Cleaned off and wiped down the lift table then reinstalled my wheel chock on the lift and remounted the wing. Pulled the speedo cable and found that the tab that sticks out of the wheel speed spinny thing broke off so the front wheel has to come back off. Then I bled the front brakes again just because I felt obligated to do something to the bike. I also checked compression because why not. 160psi in three cylinders, 130 in the left front. I'm assuming stuck rings, as the bike sat for a very long time. My plan is to ignore it for a while and see if they loosen up on their own. If they don't, I'll try ignoring it some more.
Lift table cleaned, chock reinstalled, bike back on to repair everything I found wrong during the test drive. by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:18 PM.
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post #69 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:59 AM Thread Starter
Restoration Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
30 Jan 2019

Today is a day to do nothing substantive to the bike. It's too freaking cold outside to ride it, it's too cold to open the door to start it and warm it up, etc. so I have the jet engine running, I have a smaller electric heater supplementing it trying to keep the noisy jet engine from running as much. So I'm doing little silly things, like putting Back to Black on everything made of rubber or black plastic. Everything I can reach. Brake lines, shock boots, the fairing, even the spark plug caps and their rubber boots. You don't realize how dirty those get till you clean one. It's kind of a loose gel. I put on rubber gloves, fairly slather the stuff on till everything's covered then let it sit for a while. Anyplace that dried gets another coat. After that I wipe off the excess and voila! Looks good. The plug caps are on their third go-round, each time the gel dissolves a little more dirt.
Cleaning the spark plug boots by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Back to black on all the black plastic. by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Back to black on all the black plastic. by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:19 PM.
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post #70 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:59 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
1 Feb 2019

It's cold outside and my wife's at work so o decided to begin the seat cover job in the house. Of course I had to stomp out the barn repeatedly for tools so not a huge gain. I crabbed a screwdriver out of the crap tools box, heated and bent the tip, then sharpened it to a chisel point. Then I took a pair of small nippers, ground them flat on the end so they truly became flush cut, rounded them over a bit then narrowed them to less wide than a T-50 staple. This is what I used to remove the old covers. The plastic under the seat cover itself was totally degraded, so I ended up cutting it off the back of the vinyl and peeling it off the foam separately where it was glued. The black areas on the foam are where Honda originally glued the cover on, its kind of like a big blob of silicone in the foam.
Tools modified to pull staples by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Bare seat foam. Black is glue points. by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:20 PM.
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