'85 Interstate refresh - Page 8 - Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums

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post #71 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:59 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
1 Feb 2019

I marked centerline of everything, and figured out how I wanted to position the heating elements, and marked all the outlines. I told my wife what I wanted to do this morning and she said she had some glue that was perfect for this (Narrator: It was not fine for this.). I stomped out to the barn again and grabbed a can of spray contact adhesive and used it to glue down the elements.
Marking for heater locations by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Heaters installed, x marks glue point by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:20 PM.
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post #72 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 09:59 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
1 Feb 2019

I did the same with the passenger backrest, but since it's much simpler I went ahead out to the barn, sat in front of the jet engine, and stapled it down. I used spray adhesive down the center of the backrest and foam, and used the intersections of stitching against the holes in the foam for alignment here. It looks like there should have been some string sewed into the backrest cover that would have pulled through the holes to hold it down flat in the center, but maybe that's on a fancier model.
The other day I tried my heavy duty staple gun on the plastic, and it did nothing. I ordered literally the cheapest pneumatic stapler on Amazon, and go figure that running it at 120psi it has no problem with shooting the stainless staples through. It may explode, and there are effectively zero safety features on it, but hey it was $19.

Backrest foam by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Backrest covered by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:20 PM.
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post #73 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
1 Feb 2019

Starting on the seat. I used my previous sharpie to align everything at the bottom of the back of the front seat, arguably the critical alignment point. I globbed a bunch of my wife's glue in the seam in the black goop in the seat foam, then sprayed the mating surfaces of that area with adhesive and let it tack over. Careful alignment, a little pressure and bam, it's down and in place. Now I'm going to give it a few hours to set up before I start pulling the rest of the cover into place. Everyplace there's an X is where I need to add more glue as I get it pulled down.
Back of front seat glued by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
X marks glue areas by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:21 PM.
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post #74 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
1 Feb 2019

Finished stapling the main cover down. It's not perfect but I'm happy with it. You can slightly see the outline of the power wires for the heaters on the left side, and there's a bump here and there, but it should sort itself out with a bit of use and heat from the sunlight. If the sun ever comes out.
Main seat finished by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Right side by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Left side. You can see the wires for the heated seats. by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:21 PM.
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post #75 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
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Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
2 Feb 2019

I put the seat on, hooked the front heater up to the battery and sat on it with a warm butt watching YouTube videos on my iPad.

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:21 PM.
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post #76 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
3 Feb 2019

Today was a light day, by which I mean I replaced more lights. First off was the license plate bulb. Stay with me here, to remove that required removing three machine screws, two wingnuts, two trim pieces, two bolt/nut combos, two electrical connectors, and two acorn nuts. For good measure the acorn nuts were 7mm, good to know there's something other than main jet emulsion tubes that use that size. Anyway once I had it off I realized it was rusty inside so that part went into the evaporust. Then I moved to the front to replace the marker lights with LED, shown is one of each.
License plate light disassembled for LED installation by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
License plate light bracket rust by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Starting LED light installation in front by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:22 PM.
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post #77 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
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Model: Interstate
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Once I was in that far I figured I may as well keep going. I thought about ordering an LED H4, but I summoned the power of the giving barn and found an extra one left over from my FJ1200, many bikes ago. I couldn't find any singles I liked back then so I ordered a pair, and put the spare in the pile of spare bulbs. I also cut out the fairing behind the bulb for a bit more cooling, and the LED driver fit perfectly in a small channel above it. This let me pull the headlight connector up and out of the headlight area and have it tucked up with the rest of the wiring harness. I taped the connectors together for good measure. The LED installation made most of my headlight bypass wiring harness irrelevant, since the LED draws so much less power than the halogen. It still makes me feel better though, and still pulls that load off of the factory switches and wires making the rest of the electrical system a bit more robust.
LED headlight bulb by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Cut out behind headlight for cooling by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
LED driver tucked above headlight by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-04-2019 at 04:29 PM.
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post #78 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
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Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
3 Feb 2019

Once I was that far in anyway (notice a trend?) I decided I should deal with the fuel light, and maybe look at why the speedo's slow from 0-50ish. So out came the instrument cluster, off came the face and out came the speedo. I carefully put a wee bit of light oil here and there and exercised the needle by hand, then ran the head with a cordless drill for a bit and got it all freed up. Since I was already in there (groan) I figured I'd go ahead and make the dash brighter. The bulbs Honda uses in this are only available from Honda, and are a weird size incandescent. I figured out that the base is Christmas tree size though, so I ordered a few different types of LEDs with that base. All were unidirectional though, and while good for things like the neutral indicator weren't so good for things like lighting up the speedo. I tried to use some 5 bulb 194s but the base is the wrong size and the bulb itself was too big to fit through the opening. So I compromised, by disassembling a bunch of the smaller bulbs to get the base that works, and the 194 bulbs that put out the light I wanted. I had to cut two of the bases down even further due to space constraints within the cluster. I marked everything for polarity, assembled the bulbs, and solidified them with a dab of hot glue inside. Voila! Bulbs that have the brightness I want with the bases that fit the bike. The tricky part is that I had to install the bulbs from inside the cluster. Bench test was good so back together everything goes.
And yes, I have a granite top for my workbench.
Taking apart LED bulbs 194 and 74 by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Hybrid bulbs installed by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Brighter bulbs test by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:23 PM.
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post #79 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
3 Feb 2019

Everything reassembled to the bike, and I'm pretty much done for the day. One additional challenge is that the giving barn is also sometimes the taking barn, and I couldn't find where I put the old bulbs I took out of the cluster so I had to do most of this same disassembly to the parts bike to grab some bulbs out of that, one of the ones I pulled from it was good so it went into the fuel light position, and while dimmer than the others it does at least go out now when it's supposed to. I need to see what it actually looks like at night while riding, but there's a very real possibility that I'll have to put in a dimmer for the dash. I may also have to replace that Neutral light LED with something less brutal. It's like a green flashlight pointed at you.
Much brighter dash by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Reinstalled to bike by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:23 PM.
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post #80 of 124 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 10:01 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Northern Virginia
Year: 1985
Make: Honda
Model: Interstate
Posts: 109
Garage
3 Feb 2019

Resident evil 2 is less exciting than I was hoping, so back out I went. Time to start wiring up the seat heaters. Second thing I did was turn two of these horrible harnesses made from 22g wire into a single one with minimum of 20g, mostly 14g. Everything loomed, crimped, shrunk, sealed, etc.
Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
New harness. Larger wire, staggered connectors to fit inside loom by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr

Last edited by whodat90; 02-05-2019 at 12:24 PM.
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