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-   -   Water pump cover questions (https://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/2-goldwing-technical-forum/667071-water-pump-cover-questions.html)

johnny42 04-21-2019 10:58 PM

Water pump cover questions
 
When I removed the cover, it appears as if the last mechanic that touched this used some sort of sealer at this connection. The O-Ring seemed flat (I suspect he did not use a new one) and the "packing material" was kind of brittle. I could flake off little bits here and there. I doubt it was vaseline since there was nothing "wet". Totally dried. I was able to get the old ring out but the channel was filled with this hard brittle stuff. I was able to scrape most of it away.

The pump side of the connection still appears to have some sort of residue on the mating surface. Any opinions on how to remove it. Someone suggested acetone or nail polish remover. I ordered a new O-Ring to use when I re-attach the water pump cover.

Upon reassembly, any opinions on what to use as a lubricant? Should I also use some sort of sealant?

1983 Goldwing Interstate. I'm the original owner. Many years ago, I had the timing belts changed. That was the last mechanic that touched this bike. I can't believe the factory would have assembled the 2 parts that way.

redwing52 04-21-2019 11:52 PM

John,
Why not snap a few pictures and post them so the guys can see what you are up against. If you do not have enough posts to put up the pictures send a PM to https://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums...=newpm&u=90947 and he can fix you p to post the pictures.

DaveO430 04-22-2019 06:10 AM

Clean the surface with sandpaper on a stiff block or something so it stays flat. No lubricant or sealant is needed with a new o-ring.

tamathumper 04-22-2019 07:07 AM

Drummers trick: You can contact cement a piece of sandpaper to a plate of glass or a new piece of MDF to get a super flat sanding surface. Then move the piece over the paper, instead of the other way around.

DBohrer 04-22-2019 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tamathumper (Post 5837137)
Drummers trick: You can contact cement a piece of sandpaper to a plate of glass or a new piece of MDF to get a super flat sanding surface. Then move the piece over the paper, instead of the other way around.


Wow....... We used that technique (glass) about two years ago to resurface heads on a GL1500...! Works great.....!

redwing52 04-22-2019 10:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tamathumper (Post 5837137)
Drummers trick: You can contact cement a piece of sandpaper to a plate of glass or a new piece of MDF to get a super flat sanding surface. Then move the piece over the paper, instead of the other way around.

What do drummers need to be that flat? Not the cymbals. :ROFL:

tamathumper 04-23-2019 05:49 AM

The heads on a drum are stretched over a "bearing edge".

A metal rim holds the head against that edge, and the more the rim is tightened down, the higher the pitch of the drum will be. But because there are 6, 8 or more lugs that must be tensioned around the circumference of the drum, each must be tightened the same amount to achieve a consistent tone.

If the bearing surface isn't flat all the way around the drum, you'll have a harder time tuning the head and getting a consistent sound. So a drum "shell" is made, and then each bearing edge is "surfaced" to ensure it's as flat as possible.

https://www.moderndrummer.com/2014/1...bearing-edges/

Snare drums have a depression in the bottom bearing edge that allows the snare elements to pass over or through the bearing edge and across the thin head on the bottom, but they're designed so that the "dip" is centered between lugs, and the snare elements deaden the "ring" of the bottom head of a snare drum in any event, so the effect on tone is minimized.

redwing52 04-23-2019 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tamathumper (Post 5837271)
The heads on a drum are stretched over a "bearing edge".

A metal rim holds the head against that edge, and the more the rim is tightened down, the higher the pitch of the drum will be. But because there are 6, 8 or more lugs that must be tensioned around the circumference of the drum, each must be tightened the same amount to achieve a consistent tone.

If the bearing surface isn't flat all the way around the drum, you'll have a harder time tuning the head and getting a consistent sound. So a drum "shell" is made, and then each bearing edge is "surfaced" to ensure it's as flat as possible.

https://www.moderndrummer.com/2014/1...bearing-edges/

Snare drums have a depression in the bottom bearing edge that allows the snare elements to pass over or through the bearing edge and across the thin head on the bottom, but they're designed so that the "dip" is centered between lugs, and the snare elements deaden the "ring" of the bottom head of a snare drum in any event, so the effect on tone is minimized.

I'll be. So it's not just a piece of rubber stretched over a cut off barrel???? :ROFL:

tamathumper 04-23-2019 05:29 PM

It could be if modern music is any indication.

Bike...and Dennis 04-23-2019 08:50 PM

"Modern" music is all created on a phone, by a phone ap. No instruments, talent or musical knowledge required.


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