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chesterwgunn 01-06-2009 07:03 AM

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I've decided to embark on a new career as a tent camper...About a million years ago I was a boy scout, but most of that training has long since been forgotten.. I need a suggestion on what type of tent to buy...ie....one or 2 person pup tent...that can be strapped on the bike?? I'm looking for something decent...not overly expensive..

Cousin Jack 01-06-2009 07:30 AM

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Long term tent camper, me....... and I've got a few suggestions:

First, carry the biggest tent you can. Small size and compactness is attractive, until being inside "small and compact" during a three day rainstorm. If at all possible, I'd suggest a four-person tent for two, and a two-person tent for one. My opinion only, of course......

Specific models:

Eureka Timberlines, 2-person or 4-person, $160, Campmor

R.E.I. Half-Dome, 2-person, $160, R.E.I.

A medium priced backpacking tent is sufficient; 4-season tents or mountaineering tents are overkill.... unless you are trying to get your Goldwing up the Northeast Ridge of Mt. Everest......

(Eureka Timberline 4, alonside the Clearwater River, Idaho)




Q 01-06-2009 01:17 PM

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Eureka Timberline tents are great. I've worn out 3 of them over the years. They're roomy, have a great rain fly, and very importantly they are quick and easy to set up.

I'm using a smaller Eureka backpacking tent right now but my next tent will be a Timberline.

Q

Richardrwg 01-06-2009 03:57 PM

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Cousin Jack hit the big one. I've seen so many people who went with the smallest tent (cheapest) tent they could get. They paid for it when they had to spend more than one night in it, there was no room, it got damp and everything got wet.

My advise is to look at it from the reverse direction, not the smallest you can strap on, but rather the biggest...... NO JOKES.

Myself, I have a large tent that has both a cabin and a netted dining area. It's a bit cumbersum, but it allows me a place to get the bike out of the rain as well without having to carry a cover for it. Also it allows me to keep to keep it secure if I'm in an area where I have reason to worry about someone messing with it.

Whatever you get, waterproof it with a good silcone spray every year, it's a quick job and a small investment to stay dry.

Reitzclean 01-06-2009 05:05 PM

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Although I didn't pose the question, thanks for the advice. I was looking at a 2 man tent for 2 people. Had decided to spend in the 150 range for a decent one. I'll do some measuring and figure out what I can safely carry.:action::action:



lostinflorida 01-06-2009 06:14 PM

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Don't forget the airmatress!!! Our old bones just don't like laying on the cold hard ground. :baffled:

I think that after just one or two trips you'll start catching on as far as what to take and what to leave at home.

Winger 82 01-06-2009 06:33 PM

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Cousin Jack wrote:
Quote:

Long term tent camper, me....... and I've got a few suggestions:

First, carry the biggest tent you can. Small size and compactness is attractive, until being inside "small and compact" during a three day rainstorm. If at all possible, I'd suggest a four-person tent for two, and a two-person tent for one. My opinion only, of course......

Specific models:

Eureka Timberlines, 2-person or 4-person, $160, Campmor

R.E.I. Half-Dome, 2-person, $160, R.E.I.

A medium priced backpacking tent is sufficient; 4-season tents or mountaineering tents are overkill.... unless you are trying to get your Goldwing up the Northeast Ridge of Mt. Everest......

(Eureka Timberline 4, alonside the Clearwater River, Idaho)



:coollep:Could not have said it better, when they tell you 2 man that's about all that you will get in it. Remember you will need to put a sleeping bag and a sleeping pad or matress of some kind in there to. Unless you have a place to stow your gear outside it's not going to fit inside.

Just some tips from a long time camper

:11brown:Winger 82

DougW 01-06-2009 06:34 PM

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We use a trailer so our carrying space is a bit more. We have a 6 person Coleman cabin tent. It takes a bit more to set up and take down but we like it a lot. We use cots for sleeping so the straight walls were important. There is also room for us to sit inside in lawn chairs if the weather is in an uncooperative mood. It has been through some nasty thunder storms and never got wet inside. We used it over 3 days that were raining most of the time and it stayed warm and dry inside.

No doubt it is way easy to get a tent too small. Keep in mind when they say sleeps 2 they mean just exactly that, You can sleep 2 people but that is if they are not large people, and are very friendly. That leaves no room for bags, or other gear. If you are going with 2 people a 4 person tent is the absolute minimum I would consider.

chdesh 01-06-2009 08:25 PM

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Good venting that will also keep those vicious mosquitoes Out :waving:

Foodman 01-06-2009 09:57 PM

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Before I'd worry about a tent and camping gear, I'd go buy some clothes........


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