Tire pressure monitor - Page 3 - Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums

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post #21 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-29-2010, 01:53 PM
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I've owned a Jeep Grand Cherokee for 5 yrs. with TPMS on all wheels including the spare wheel, I find them very reliable and accurate, the monitor on the dash starts blinking when the tyre drops about 3lbs. although you don't get a reading from the spare tyre until it loses pressure.
I think TPMS would be a god send on a Wing.
But you can't beat a good tyre kick before you set off.
Dave.............

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post #22 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-31-2010, 11:54 PM
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I like the idea of having the sensor tell me if my tire is losing pressure, after all you could puncture a tire with a nail and develop a slow leak while on a trip and may or may not realize the loss in pressure or looseness of the bike. but the tire monitor systems on the market say they have a battery and the sensor must be replaced after about 4-5 years and are rather expensive. maybe I will givem a try someday.

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post #23 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-01-2010, 06:09 AM
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At the risk of not being accused of being an 'aginner', now that I know what one is...

I have come to the conclusion that the increased cost, complexity and the distraction from yet another system to monitor is offset by the safety need to have a TPS system on a motorcycle when the motorcycle is equipped with a car tire that is a Run-Flat type.

Kit and I agree after some discussion of the topic up at N3 that a RunFlat tire should never be used on a motorcycle without a TPS monitor due to the problem of unseen deflation and riding long enough flat to destroy the tire unnoticed, which could likely happen at speed.

You see I'm not really an aginner. I'm just against unnecessary trade-offs in bikes. Especially where the rider has more cognitive time lost processing data that is not essential to riding at a given instant.

That's why I'm against cell phone communication or texting while riding.
That's why I don't like digital voltmeters vs analog (small example but it still takes time)
That's why I mount things like analog LED voltmeters and SmartLights for heads-up displays on my windscreen.
That's why I don't like the 5 in one meters (besides the fact that they are crap).

The more routine processing time you use for the rider, the more likely he/she will be in trouble as a result at some point (ask GeezerGlider about that). Because things happen fast as every rider knows. And that still assumes that the products you become attached to always give you good data. The more things get complex, the higher likelihood things will break or mislead you and the less you have control over their function or repair. I think 1800 owners will come to realize this as time goes on as the systems age and Honda moves away from supporting them.

Like everything, any addition must be weighed for the risk/benefit ratio and decided on by the individual owner.

So yes, if I see things going the more complex direction with more for the rider to do or to get him in trouble, especially if he is mindless about it's use due to a false sense of improved riding experience and safety, I look at the risk/benefit ratio pretty hard.

RunFlat car tires need TPS because the tire can easily present a situation that is more dangerous than the increased complexity and cost warrants without it, due to the lack of visual signs that might otherwise provide an early warning.












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post #24 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-01-2010, 12:34 PM
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Hi JJ,
As I have said previousely I have had TPS on my Grand Cherokee for some years now, I have only had to replace one transmitter valve due to the tyre fitters stupidity when having new tyres fitted, I have had similar systems on several different vehicles over the last 10yrs and never had a malfunction of any type.
When I had to replace the sender unit damaged by the tyre fitter Chrisler wanted £71.00 GBP but I bought from ebay new for £12.50 GBP. It would appear that most manufacturers use the same system and transmitting frequency i.e. Ford, Peugeot, Land Rover, Renault Etc, I actually fitted a Rover transmitter valve which was identical in looks and frequency as the Chrysler one but with Rover stamped on it and it worked straight away.
I find that TPS does not give me information overload but once or twice when it has started flashing to tell me I have a slow puncture I have had enough warning to rectify the situation in a safe and timely manner.
Run flat tyres or not I feel it should be a must have addition to any vehicle.
Regards Dave............

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post #25 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-02-2010, 08:39 AM
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post #26 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-05-2010, 05:10 PM
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There's a TMPS on my 2009 GW. When it kept registering low pressure, I eventually found a nail in the rear tire. Checking the air pressure in the tires adds another 15-20 minutes to a planned short ride. Checking the rear tire requires putting it up on the center stand, a pain in the shoulder and back for this little, old guy. The low pressure light does not come on until you are already moving down the road. That's another real pain. If it's cold outside, the light will eventually go out after the tire warms up. Otherwise, you have to stop somewhere and check the pressure. The system does not tell you which tire is low so you have to check both. I've had the flashing tire light come on when the pressure is only 1 pound less than the recommended 36 front and 41 rear. You will have to carry a small air compressor and have a 12 volt plug (with a large enough fuse) to run it. Good luck. The other TPMS light came on after I got a new tire put on my Wing last week at the dealer. It's a steady light (the low pressure light is off). The dealer didn't know what the problem was and asked me to leave the bike with them for a week or so (it's still under warranty). If anyone else has run into this kind of problem, please let me know and I'll relay this to the dealer's mechanic.
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post #27 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-06-2010, 02:49 PM Thread Starter
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Jay50 wrote:
Quote:
There's a TMPS on my 2009 GW. When it kept registering low pressure, I eventually found a nail in the rear tire. Checking the air pressure in the tires adds another 15-20 minutes to a planned short ride. Checking the rear tire requires putting it up on the center stand, a pain in the shoulder and back for this little, old guy. The low pressure light does not come on until you are already moving down the road. That's another real pain. If it's cold outside, the light will eventually go out after the tire warms up. Otherwise, you have to stop somewhere and check the pressure. The system does not tell you which tire is low so you have to check both. I've had the flashing tire light come on when the pressure is only 1 pound less than the recommended 36 front and 41 rear. You will have to carry a small air compressor and have a 12 volt plug (with a large enough fuse) to run it. Good luck. The other TPMS light came on after I got a new tire put on my Wing last week at the dealer. It's a steady light (the low pressure light is off). The dealer didn't know what the problem was and asked me to leave the bike with them for a week or so (it's still under warranty). If anyone else has run into this kind of problem, please let me know and I'll relay this to the dealer's mechanic.
I really regret starting this thread because I have had to deal with the problems with TPMS ever since, Rudy is right about it being just something else to give problems.
Jay50, the dealer should have a scan tool to diagnose the problem with, in fact they have to have it to deal with initializing the sensors. If a sensor is replaced it has to be initialized to the vehicle or it will not work. Sometimes they have to be re-initialized after a tire has been deflated, not supposed to but they do. Also the vehicle has to be driven to a predetermined speed for the sensor to reset after a pressure loss.

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post #28 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 11:21 PM
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Thanks. They've had my bike a week and I'll call them tomorrow and relay this information in the event they didn't consider it. I told them to first check the sensor on the wheel of the new tire. I never had a problem when the rear tire was replaced, but that was done at my original dealer (I moved since then).
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