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compared to other wings, its a doddle, its like taking a car tyre off, remove the bolts and only the wheel comes off. The hard bit is getting a bit of height to remove the tyre, alternatively if the bike has not bene fitted with a tow bar etc, you can take out the middle section at the back, what the licence plate is connected to and wheel it out from there.
 

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Depends on the year GL1800. derekhendry is correct, but I never heard it called a "doddle"! I love it... This Scottish yank has learned a new one. :waving:
If the GL1800 is a 06 or newer or has a hitch, the job will be quicker with a simple motorcycle jack. Some change the tire with the rear wheel hanging over the curb or even lay the bike on it's right side in the grass. I have a 05. Seems the 06 and newer Wings have extra equipment hanging behind the rear fender. Also if your friend has a 70 series tire, you may have to deflate it to clear the wheel studs upon removal and installation.
Oh yes. With the tires on the ground, side stand down and foot on the rear brake...... this is the best time to losen the wheel lug nuts.
All in all it is actually a doodle to do!

:action:
 

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I keep forgetting we are round the globe here:)If you are not sure what a doddle is, it means easy. On past wings there was lots of things to do, the 15 which i started with was almost like major surgery, certainly the first time you did it, taking brake parts off, suspension, loosening exhausts etc, so compared to this beastie, the 18 is a breeze to do.

Coreventure, i would say the majority of wings in the UK have towing equipment fitted to them and as such removing the back wheel from the rear is a none starter. We also have come up with a way that takes about 3 guys to do, baically one person removes the wheel while the other 2 tip the bike over on its front wheel and centre stand enough to get the bike wheel out, i am in no way advising this to others though.
 

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You just about have to have a lift, not a jack or just take the bike out in the grass, lay an old blanket down and walk it down on the right side. Jacks do not work well with the 1800 and the rear tire is not coming out the back without removing the seat, undoing a couple bolts to the rear fender and pulling it and the Amp and drain hose out of the way, along with unbolting the cross bar.

These little Harbor Freight and Sears jacks do not work well with the 1800, the bottom of the motor at the balance points is not level at all, and both exhaust tubes are somewhat lower than the motor and lifting the bike puts all the weight directly on the exhaust. So you have to make some type of spacer and or use hockey pucks, or some other makeshift situation, so as to one small mistake means a dropped bike.

If you do not have a lift so as to avoid makeshift spacers and pressure on the exhaust, it is best to use the lay it on the side method. Lay an old blanket on the grass and just walk it down, naturally after breaking the lug nuts loose first, then you need to rock the bike a bit and allow the rear guard to sink into the grass just a bit or the rear wheel will stick into the ground as it comes out and not want to fully come out of the wheel well. But just a little rocking will sink the rear guard and allow the tire to kick up just enough.

Also depends on what type highway peg might be mounted on the side front engine guard, sometimes wise to loosen those and allow them to turn up also.

If you have a trailer you can run the bike up on it and strap it down on the center stand allowing the rear to stick out in the air, this works well also. But you do have to support the ramp in the up and level position then lower it or remove it once the bike is on the center stand, so not all trailers will work with this method.

As for the actual change of the tire with a new tire on the rim, that radial tire on the 1800 is a challenge, it is stiff, the first bead comes right off, with a lot of soap and lubricant, that bottom one coming up over the rim is a bear. Takes a bit of practice and with the harbor freight system I found it neccasary to strap the wheel to the supports of the changer to keep the wheel from spinning on me , and gave up on trying to use those rim protectors, just go on and run the bar around the tire and flip it off, then wipe the rim with a rag later.

Without the right equipment, it is well worth the money to just trot down to the local shop and let them do it.

Kit
 

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Hi

I'm not big on laying the bike over. I'm sure it works fine just hate to lay it over and chance scratches. Taking the middle of the rear fender off and amp. out only takes 15 min. and you can leave it up on it's center stand. As far as changing the tire I put a bolt through the center and through the work bench and held it tight to the bench it's easier than wrestling with a moving rim. Yes the tire is stiff but a little windex for lubericant and two tire irons make short work of it.

Good luck Tom
 

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you will be laying it on the crash bars, if you do it on the grass or even using pillows there will no be damage done whatsoever
 

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I removed my 06 rear tire on the center stand and had to loosen the amp in the rear. I thought about mounting a small chain hoist to the ceiling of my garage and connecting two strong straps to the rear crash bars and connecting them to the hoist in a "A" configuration. Then,with the bike on the center stand, loosen the lug nuts and then lift the rear of the bike and then R&R the tire and torque the lug nuts with the bike back on the center stabd. The front tire should remain on the ground.Has anyome tried it this way yet? Pat
 

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Cowboy26a wrote:
I removed my 06 rear tire on the center stand and had to loosen the amp in the rear. I thought about mounting a small chain hoist to the ceiling of my garage and connecting two strong straps to the rear crash bars and connecting them to the hoist in a "A" configuration. Then,with the bike on the center stand, loosen the lug nuts and then lift the rear of the bike and then R&R the tire and torque the lug nuts with the bike back on the center stabd. The front tire should remain on the ground.Has anyome tried it this way yet? Pat
They do not recommend using the crash bars as a "lifting" device. :weightlifter:
 

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globetrotter wrote:
Cowboy26a wrote:
I removed my 06 rear tire on the center stand and had to loosen the amp in the rear. I thought about mounting a small chain hoist to the ceiling of my garage and connecting two strong straps to the rear crash bars and connecting them to the hoist in a "A" configuration. Then,with the bike on the center stand, loosen the lug nuts and then lift the rear of the bike and then R&R the tire and torque the lug nuts with the bike back on the center stabd. The front tire should remain on the ground.Has anyome tried it this way yet? Pat
They do not recommend using the crash bars as a "lifting" device. :weightlifter:
I kinda figured that. That way would be too easy. Pat
 
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