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Impersonating a mechanic
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
PROBLEM:

I'm in the process of removing the carbs from my 1100 and got as far as removing the covers from the right side vacuum chambers. They were all very tight, but the inboard screw on the #3 cover wouldn't budge.

So I soaked it in PB Blaster and then used a #2 JIS driver, leaned on it hard and tried to turn the screwdriver with a pair of channel locks. No go. I was able to get an impact driver on it, but not at a good angle, so now the head of the screw is kind of buggered up.

Before I go out and spend money on a Dreml tool to cut a slot in the screw head, I thought I'd check here first to see if anyone has any other ideas. Any thoughts?

MYSTERY:

With the carbs now loose on top of the engine and the fuel and vacuum hoses off, there is a puddle of coolant on top of the engine. Where could this be coming from? I can't figure it out. Thanks.
 

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Cross over tube? Might have knocked it loose.
 

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continue with PB letting it soak in . Also you might warm it up around that stubborn screw . If you have a hair drier that gets fairly hot . Understand I dont mean hot as with a torch . Another way to get localized heat which could help get the PB in the threads might be place a soldering iron right in the screw head and heat , that way all the heat is basically on the screw only .
Id be careful using an impact , so as not to bend the ear of the cover or base .
 

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Are the cables off and the intake elbows turned 90 degs so they are flat apposite each others? That way you can move the carbs enough to get the impact driver on the screw, squared up. Otherwise it is a drill and easy out. Home Depot sells a little kit of 3 bits with the drill on one end and the easyout on the other end of each bit.

Puddle mystery,
It might be the crossover tube orings leaking, there are 4 of them that need replacing if there is one, do all. Or it's from above and dripping down, just have to look closely to find the leak, hose connections, radiator cap, overflow tube.
 

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Don't use an impact driver, you could easily break the ear off the carb body. Move the carbs to the right enough to get a straight shot at it and drill the head off the screw with a bit slightly larger than the screw diameter. A left handed bit would probably remove the screw before the head popped off. The rest of the screw will probably come out easily.
 

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Been working on a newly acquired GL1000 and had to remove the front cover to get at a goner water pump. The Phillips head bolts were an absolute buggar to get out and I thought I'd have to pull the engine but I used a variety of techniques gleaned from Randakk. The one that amazed me was the "Bingo" method. See step 7 here:
http://www.randakks.com/TechTip75.htm
I had a couple of bolts come right out with a screwdriver after using this technique. Also, I have a tiny pair of Craftsman "Channelox" that got at least one out. If the screw has seized in the aluminum, you're done for. No amount of penetrating oil or extraction techniques will work. I had one of those and put in a helicoil. I documented the technique I used here:
http://www.ngwclub.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=45190
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Crossover tube?

Cross over tube? Might have knocked it loose.
Thanks for the reply, Pat. Could well be the problem if it's above the engine block and has coolant in it. However: I don't think I've heard of a crossover tube. I'll look for it, but what does it look like and/or where is it connected? Thanks a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
continue with PB letting it soak in . Also you might warm it up around that stubborn screw . If you have a hair drier that gets fairly hot . Understand I don't mean hot as with a torch . Another way to get localized heat which could help get the PB in the threads might be place a soldering iron right in the screw head and heat , that way all the heat is basically on the screw only .
Id be careful using an impact , so as not to bend the ear of the cover or base .
I'm leaving PB Blaster on it overnight. And I'll try the soldering iron on it, too. Thanks for the suggestion. I already tried a heat gun, but it didn't help. The odd thing is that the screw turns about a mm or less. I can see and feel it. Maybe there is a burr or something on the bottom of the screw shaft. I'll check that out tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Are the cables off and the intake elbows turned 90 degs so they are flat apposite each others? That way you can move the carbs enough to get the impact driver on the screw, squared up. Otherwise it is a drill and easy out. Home Depot sells a little kit of 3 bits with the drill on one end and the easyout on the other end of each bit.

Puddle mystery,
It might be the crossover tube orings leaking, there are 4 of them that need replacing if there is one, do all. Or it's from above and dripping down, just have to look closely to find the leak, hose connections, radiator cap, overflow tube.
Stu, Thanks for the comments. The intake elbows have been removed, but even with the impact shaft (extension) nearly vertical it still wouldn't budge. And I managed to mess up the head anyway.

You're probably right about the crossover tube leaking. I'll check tomorrow morning to see if the four o-rings are included in Randakk's kit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Don't use an impact driver, you could easily break the ear off the carb body. Move the carbs to the right enough to get a straight shot at it and drill the head off the screw with a bit slightly larger than the screw diameter. A left handed bit would probably remove the screw before the head popped off. The rest of the screw will probably come out easily.
Dave, thanks for the suggestions. If I can get it far enough to the right to get that straight shot, I'll get a left-handed bit and try that. And I don't think I'll be using an impact driver on it again. Thanks for the warning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Been working on a newly acquired GL1000 and had to remove the front cover to get at a goner water pump. The Phillips head bolts were an absolute buggar to get out and I thought I'd have to pull the engine but I used a variety of techniques gleaned from Randakk. The one that amazed me was the "Bingo" method. See step 7 here:
http://www.randakks.com/TechTip75.htm
I had a couple of bolts come right out with a screwdriver after using this technique. Also, I have a tiny pair of Craftsman "Channelox" that got at least one out. If the screw has seized in the aluminum, you're done for. No amount of penetrating oil or extraction techniques will work. I had one of those and put in a helicoil. I documented the technique I used here:
http://www.ngwclub.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=45190
Terry, thanks for the help and the two links. The Bingo method is definitely worth a try. I'll have to be careful about breaking the ear off the carb body, as Dave said. And that's a great tutorial you posted on screw removal and Helicoil implanting. If it comes to that, the information will be very useful.

I have to say this forum is just fantastic. You post a problem and within a couple of hours you get great help from five really good mechanics. Amazing! And thanks again to all.
 

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Junior Grue
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The odd thing is that the screw turns about a mm or less. I can see and feel it. Maybe there is a burr or something on the bottom of the screw shaft.
There's likely no hope of saving the threads in the hole as they're coming out with the screw.
Hopefully there's enough meat left to put a thread insert in, else it's a new/used carburetor.
 

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Hi all
Many years ago when I started as a mechanic, my forman told me to always try to tighten a stubourn screw or bolt before loosening. This advice has worked for me most times.
Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Another theory:

Ken and Paul, thank you for your replies.

Paul, I tried turning it to the right, but I didn't really lean on it. It's probably worth another try. But as posted above, it does appear to move very slightly.

It occurred to me that the screw might be frozen near the tip and broken off down there in such a way that it it prevents the top portion from turning. And as Ken says, the threads might be toast. Hopefully, we're both wrong. We won't find out until later today, at least, when I can get over to the garage.
 

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Can't see it very well, but only tube going from one side to other right underneath the carbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, thanks to the help I got here, the carbs are now sitting in my basement waiting to be cleaned/rebuilt.

I was able to get the frozen screw out without having to go buy anything. Using the "Bingo" method mentioned by Terry (tlbranth) I whapped the head of the screwed-up screw with the flat surface of a socket wrench extension and hammer. Then I put a JIS screwdriver on the screw-head and whacked that, which created clean enough slots on the re-distorted head to get it to bite. The overnight soak in PB Blaster probably helped too.

Immediately after getting the carbs out, I realized what the crossover tubes are and what they do. And sure enough, there's coolant leaking from both ends of the longer one (right side), so I'll get the o-rings and replace all four.

FWIW: To get the throttle cables off easily, I used a trick mentioned by cyclebuster on the goldwingdocs site a few years ago. You just remove the handlebar clamps and set the right handlebar grip as close to the tach as you can get it. Then pull the throttle cables down as close to the carbs as they will go. Then you pull the carbs to the left, and there's plenty of slack to get the cables off easily. No home-made hook required.

Thanks again to everyone. I'm sure I'll be back before the project is completed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·


Can't see it very well, but only tube going from one side to other right underneath the carbs.
Thanks, Pat. Our posts just crossed in cyberspace. As soon as the carbs came out, I realized what the crossover tubes were. In the photo below, you can see a drop of coolant just ready to fall from the joint. Thanks for your help.
 

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when you are ready to replace the O rings on the cross over tubes , be sure that you have very clean tube end`s and the parts that they fit into are cleaned too.
use a little lube on every thing that slides togather .
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
when you are ready to replace the O rings on the cross over tubes , be sure that you have very clean tube end`s and the parts that they fit into are cleaned too.
use a little lube on every thing that slides togather .
I'll do that. Thanks for the tip.
 
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