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I made a big mistake a month ago. I took off with my sidestand in the "down' position.
I got up to about 30-40 mph and then I felt a "bump" I realized what I did wrong and grab the clutch, the brakes and tried to get it stopped.
I didn't make it. The side stand rode me into the curb and over I went.
It tore up the fairing, crash bars, trunk and lots of chrome bits.
I've always wanted to paint the bike. Now I get my chance.
I've bought all the parts that got damaged in the wreck and now am rebuilding and repainting my baby to better than it was before.

I've decided I will NEVER let that happen again. I've came up with a side stand safety switch circuit that will kill your ignition immediately when you release the clutch if the side stand is in the down position.

I've attached (hopefully) the schematic of the circuit. (Note ALL switches and relays are shown in the "at rest" position (no voltage to the coil of the relay))

Here is how it works:

A switch will be mounted on the side stand with new 12 volt circuit added using a 5 amp fuse that feeds the side stand switch. With the side stand in the "up" position the 12 volt circuit off the ign switch flows through the side stand relay terminals 30-87.

When the side stand is in the "down" position it energizes the coil of the side stand relay sending the ign circuit out the 87a terminal which in turns feeds the 30 terminal of the neutral light relay. If the neutral light is on, it energizes the coil of the neutral light relay switching power to the 87a terminal which then feeds the ign switch allowing the bike to idle in neutral with the side stand in the "down" position.

If the neutral light is not on, the ign circuit flows out the 87 terminal of the neutral light relay which then is feeding the 30 terminal of the clutch relay. The 12 volts for the coil of this relay, clutch relay, is fed off the the 5 amp fuse. The clutch switch mounted on handle bars will provide the ground (on an 82 it is the green/red wire) for this coil. With the clutch lever depressed, the ign circuit will feed the 87a terminal allowing the bike to run. The moment you release the clutch lever it will disengage the coil of the clutch relay routing in ign circuit to terminal 87 which has nothing attached but a rubber boot to protect the ign circuit. Diodes are placed at each point where the ign circuit wire will be attaching to others from the other relays to protect the circuit in case a relay malfunctions. The diode are not necessary for nothing will "back feed" into another. They are just a safety factor.

For those who want a warning light, it can be added to alert you that you are about to make a fool of yourself by letting they clutch with the side stand in the "down" position and killing the ign switch.

The warning light will be added to ign circuit coming off the neutral light relay terminal 87 to clutch relay terminal 30. Splice a wire in there and add a flasher relay and route a wire to a amber or red light on the dash. It will flash and let you know the side stand is down.

I hope this helps anyone who wants to use it. The cost of this feature is three relays, one 5 amp fuse, one switch, some wire and terminals. Approximate cost 25 dollars. The cost of repairing my bike, $1500 and still spending.
 

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I did something very similar - I wrote it up here. I used a sealed magnetic reed switch and a magnet that I epoxied to the stand and the frame (pictures on that link). For a warning, I used a very bright flashing red LED on the dash in front of me. It's worked for me several times this year already, and I haven't once left my kickstand down.

If you wanted, it could very easily be connected through a relay to do the same thing as you have done. The reed switches are available as normally closed and normally open, so you could configure it with an SPDT relay, so that the relay is not energized all the time (i.e. the relay is only energized when the kickstand is down - when the kickstand is up, the reed switch opens, de-energizes the relay, and the relay allows the ignition to run).

I also already have a relay connected to my neutral light (it turns my auxiliary driving lights off when I'm in neutral, because when I'm sitting, idling, the bike doesn't put out enough power to run them without running the battery down). You could do something similar - if the neutral light is off, and the kickstand is down, then kill the ignition.
 

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After reading MacLean post,I began thinking of part failure. So I've added a fourth relay, clutch power relay,to power the clutch relay.With only three relays, the clutch relay was always energized and everytime you would operate your clutch it would operate the clutch relay there by put unnecessary use on the relay which may cause early failure.



Here is the fix to keep the clutch relay from always working:



From the neutral relay terminal 87 (ign wire) splice in another 5 amp fuse and attach to 85 terminal of the clutch power relay. The 12 volt wire which feed the side stand switch is feed to the 30 terminal of the clutch power relay. Wire the 87a terminal of the clutch powwer relay to the 85 of the clutch relay. The ign wire coming of the 87 terminal of the neutral light still feeds the 30 terminal of the clutch relay.



See attached drawing for update
 

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Monkey with a Football
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Not trying to steal you or GSMacLean's thunder because this is an important safety feature for any bike and the more we get out there the safer we will all be.

The SmartLight 1200, 1100 and 1000 I have been working on will have this feature as well with two options. LED + Buzzer or Engine Kill (or all three).

The big sticking point for me right now is a reliable stand switch.

Anything you have come up for that part would be appreciated if you could share that and I will do the same as I finish up my research and testing.

I have some ideas but why reinvent the wheel for such an important part.

Thanks
 

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If you want a buzzer, you can add another circuit at the same place the light is. But buzzer can be drowned out from the radio and lights can be missed. Ever leave your turn signal on longer than necessary? It has a flashing light and a constant clicking sound. The whole idea was to disable the bike from travelling any distance with the side stand in the down position.
 

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Monkey with a Football
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I agree with you on the kill-engine function of it and that is the way my 1500 is and I like it that way.

When I proposed this concept on some other more specialized boards, the users were pretty much split on the responses.

1. Kill the engine

2. Don't kill the engine. Instead loud buzzer for 10-20 seconds and blink wildly and continuously as long as the problem exists.

Bear in mind that it is very likely that the LED I use will be noticed.

I think I know how those who have not had one feel. I'm that way about all the safety interlocks my lawnmower has.
But I adjusted to those pretty easily and now it doesn't bug me at all.

Thing is... I'd rather have someone use SOME type of warning system to none. If this will help some who wouldn't have added this because of the kill-engine feature, that is still better than them using nothing, like they have now. So in itself I still feel it is a good thing to offer.
 

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I did the same think on the other side. I pulled up to a gas pump and forgot to put down the kick stand. The bike fell over and pined me up between the pump and the bike, damm near breaking my leg.

The other time i pulled back on to a Interstate . Just as I hit 4th gear the engine started dying. Not a pretty sight to see a semi in rear view . Forgot to turn the fuel

supply on.
The other time I left the fog lights on , killed the battery.
My fix: a label gun .

Take off and parking check list.

Worked for me!!:gunhead:
 

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pilotwannabe wrote:
The other time I left the fog lights on , killed the battery.
My fix: a label gun .

Take off and parking check list.
I have this, too. Right on my dash, I have pasted: "GISH"

The four things I tend to forget when not thinking:

- G: turn the gas on
- I: plug the intercom in (cable to helmet)
- S: put the sidestand up
- H: make sure helmet is fastened
 

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Rudy wrote:
The big sticking point for me right now is a reliable stand switch.
I wanted to make sure of this as well, which is why I used a sealed magnetic reed switch. It's been on there for several months now, through about three or four thousand miles, and it seems to be working perfectly. I wish the wires coming out of it were a little more substantial, but I routed them as to not ever be anywhere that could cause a problem. I think I put a link to the actual switch I used on the site I posted above.
 

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2006 Wing, 1989 Wing, Past: Honda Elite, Suzuki 450, Honda VT500, 84Wing
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I just told my mc mechanic about my scrape with a guard rail caused by the kickstand and me not being able to know where it was when I thought I did and I got all sorts of looks of amazement that I was not badly hurt.

Apparently this is an under advertised source of accidents with really high potential for disaster.
I've missed kickstands before but was always able to get them up and never considered that there was enormous downside of a down kickstand incident.

I heard nothing about kickstand safety in the MSF safety course. If I missed it, it was mentioned in passing. I am going to contact them to see if they will add something to the course about this. There are lots of bikes without any kind of kickstand safety devices. Apparently Honda thought the rubber on the foot was good enough. Clearly it comes up short.

I'll post more about this later with contact info for anyone else who feels strongly enough to send a note.
 

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its a good system light or buzzer either way is really cool but i agree with gs, get into a routine and do that same routine each and every time dosent matter what you do on your routine as long as you start and end in the same sequence.



the ride aint goin no where lol just go slow and ez
 
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