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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, question for the pros! I recently did a 'spring' tuneup. (I know... a little late) I replaced the timing belts, did the neon coil swap, installed new plug wires,(bosch 7mm automotive resistor wires) and new plugs, flushed cooling system. I have been through 3 tanks of fuel since doing everything. When the old plugs came out, the insulators were a little lighter than I expected, but not bad. Each of the plugs were light through about 3/4 the way around the insulators, and then noticeably darker for the remaining 1/4 of the insulator. I am running harley bagger mufflers instead of the factory pipes. When I put the new plugs in, (and here is where I am going to get into trouble) I couldn't locate my plug gapper. I looked at the gaps, decided they were probably close enough, and put them in. After 3 tanks of fuel, I finally located my gapper. I checked them and they were all around 50-55 thousandths. I gapped them properly and put them back in, but did notice that the insulators are white, with just one darker spot on each one. I assume that has something to do with the position of the plugs in relation to the combustion chamber. The insulators aren't blistered or scorched looking, just white. Almost comparable to new plugs. Also, I went from 42-43mpg to around 39mpg. I am not concerned about the mileage, just don't want to cause engine damage. I should have taken a photo of the plugs, but I didn't think about it while I had them out. I did take it for a quick ride afterwards, and it certainly runs smoother. Another thing that might be worth mentioning, I only ride the bike around town, and rarely go over 3,000 rpms. Would the overly excessive gaps on the plugs cause a white insulator? The bike runs good, idles good, and doesn't seem to have any issues other than when I first crank it up when cold. I do have to choke it most of the time, and give it a little time to warm up. Oh, and the bike is an '82 interstate with 52k miles.
Thanks for listening to my rambling!
Darren
 

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Sounds like you've done all the good stuff buddy, Just ride it now and enjoy it, tip though, those motors are happier at 4, 5, & 6K than always at 3K and below. That might be what you consider to be your problem, I personally wouldn't, but thats just me.

Maybe down the line you'll need a carb sync, but I'd load the motor first!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is exactly what I wanted to hear! I know I shouldn't lug the motor like I do, but my other bike is a crotch rocket and the lower rpms are a nice change from that buzzy thing.
 

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With the neon coil mine is happy with the plugs gapped at .035", I have not tried changing the gap because it runs good the way it is.
 

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The black spot is due to the indexing of the plug in the head. The near-side wall of the chamber ceiling is directly behind the darker discoloration, which is opposite of maximum flame travel and indicates a rich mixture in the chamber.
Marking a plug for maximum flame travel will index its electrode nearest to the wall.
Indexing in this fashion is considered by many to be an optimizing effort in building flame kernel in the direction of maximum flame travel without the electrodes strap interfering the kernel growth. Lends to being most efficient.

I was going to say (was - meaning that Dave hit it) that a "proper" gap is probably a undefined gap as related to the service manual since you have changed the components of the secondary ignition. Those coils should dictate a baseline gap measurement, ...and then experiment from there on. Dave seems to have found what works best with his and maybe that should be a baseline for these coils, ...with resistor wire, ...with resistor plugs, ...etc..
 
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