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I spoke to a guy that usually is pretty knowledgeable.He said if the plug is hard wired on 85 and later 1200's there shouldn't be any stator issues.The later stators were improved. ???????

As i just bought an 85 with 59,000 miles (Typo error on my profile) If I hard wire it -I wonder if there is any security to it.I'm not wealthy and believe in preventing problems before you have them in an inconvient location -on the road ,away from home,where you are at someon elses mercy ETC.

Has anyone noticed if the failure rate on the 85 and later is less then on the 84s.Does lighting the electricsal load help?

Are the aftermarket stators better than the OEM ones?

I might just replace mine before it bites my butt when I don't want to be bitten.I don't need hassels on the road wwith my health the way it is.

While we are at it- What about ignition problems are they hard to work on on the road-like the pickups.Would carrying a spare coil and pulse generator be smart?

Thanks Mr Bill
 

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Welcome to a great forum Oldmisterbill.

It's hard to tell when a stator is going to die. I've had my bike since new and the stator went at 38000 Klms. Which is about 19000 miles. I had it stored in a heated Business Unit of mine for a while, but alweays rode it and maintaned it. But One thing I would suggest if I were you, is to switch over most of your lights to LED's. That will help out a lot. But you must leave one or two reg lights in, otherwise you will always have a light on on the dashboard. The reason is that with the reg bulbs they draw so much, and when a bulb burns out the light on the dash comes on to tell you that. So when you put in LEDs, the draw drops two thirds. Just don't get the LEDs that are made in china. there are good ones made down there in the US that will run for at least 20.000 Hrs. these lights are twice as bright too. The other choice fro the stator, is the Poor boy external altanator. Good luck. Doug.
 

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Anytime you hard wire a connection that does not require routine tear down , naturally you do gain a reliable and better connection.

But, it does seem the at or around 60,000 miles plus or minus a bit the stators fail. That seems to be the time line on them.

Have you considered the external alternator, the Poor Boy system? Reliable, easy to get to, and provides more power for added lights and accessories such as heated gloves and so on?

As for carrying extra parts, sure, fuses, wire, tools, tape, but most likely if something like a pulse generator goes out it will warn you before it totally fails, but if it does working beside the road is not a good place to be anymore. Way too dangerous. Just to replace a fuse one has to have four eyes and never take any of them off the traffic and be ready to run for cover.

Kit
 

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Stator life on a 1200 is hard to predict and they don't give advance warning. One thing that will help is to change oil often. There's some evidence that acids in the oil eat the enamel insulation on the windings. Don't know if that's true but changing oil would reduce that if it is. I had a 1200 with 68,000 miles on it with the original stator and the stator plug and socket still in the circuit. I did splice out the connector as I have done on all the four cylinder 'Wings I've had just as a precautionary move.

Some like the Poorboy modification, I prefer the stock stator though. It's cheaper to replace than to convert to the external alternator and usually they last for well over twenty years. Dropping the engine and changing the stator doesn't take all that much more time or effort than putting in the external alternator when you take into consideration all the time rigging up pulleys and all the measuring, cutting and filing that goes into the installation.

As for post '85 stators being better, I doubt it. The stators of the 1000 and 1100s though almost identical to those of the 1200 but rarely fail. I haven't heard that the '85 LTD or the '86 SEI with their higher capacity stators are particularly likely to fail.
 
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