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My GL1200 burns oil for a bit on the left cylinders after being on the sidestand for a length of time i know that this is not uncommon, my bike has done about 110,000 miles it clears itself in about a mile or so, my question is would replacing the valve oilseals cure this or am i better off just living with it and keeping an eye on the oil levels, putting the bike on the main stand in my shed/garage is not really an option as it is on an incline and once on the stand it is a two man job to get it off again.
 

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I did this at Christmas on my 1200. I had to do the head gaskets and I also fitted the valve seals that came with the kit. Bottom line is that they stopped the smoking at start-up. I did check that there was no sideways play in the valves and guides, new seals would be a waste of time if there was excessive play. I also checked that the valves were not thinner or ovalled in the areas where they go through the seals. They passed muster. My bike has less mileage than yours but I'd still say it's worth doing the valve seals if the smoke bothers you.
 

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Thanks for that Eamonn i think the smoke bothers the people behind more than me:p, I was wondering if the oil gets in downthrough the seals or if it settles on the bores andseaps past the rings while standing has anyone any thoughts on this!. I have noticed that sometimes after a week or so of being laid up oil will drip from the exhaust where the downpipes slot into the silencer/muffler. question is is it out of the cylinder if the exhaust valve is open or running down the valve stem from the head:gunhead:
 

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Probably out of the cylinder is where it is dripping. In which case it's getting into the cylinder thruogh the valve seals anyway. Mileage doesn't seem to be a factor in valve seal wear, it's more down to age. I've seen many Goldwings that were only a few years old and had 60 or 70000 miles that never smoked, and 10 year old Wings with as little as 12,000 miles that smoked bad at startup. The seals just harden and less flexible with old age.
 

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It's not likely you'd leak enough oil into the cylinder to damage anything. Valve stem sealsdo tend to get hard with age and leak a bit. Ford 4.6L V8s had a real problem with them for years until they came out with a better seal. If you park indoors in a safe place park it on the center stand, probably won't smoke as much. Satisfying to replace them and get rid of the smoke though!

:waving:
 

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Al long as the engine runs smooth and the spark plugs burn clean, go ahead and replace the valve stem seals. You'll notice a world of difference at start-up. You don't have to pull the heads unless you suspect valve stem / seat / face wear or damage. The job should take aprox. 1 to 2 hrs per side depending on your skill level. Clean the tops of the cyl. heads and the faces of the valve covers before re-installing and put a very small dab of silicone sealant at the bases of each cam saddle at the 1/2 round... The gaskets tend to leak there and Honda did the same thing at the factory to insure an oil tight seal. Good luck and don't rush the job. :)
 

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Just a thought before you get started on changing the valve seals. Make sure you don't use Teflon valve seals as they tend to leak for street usage, Viton valve seals are a much better choice because they remain more flexible and seal betterat lower temperatures.

Vic
 

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Thanks for the advice guys, Mynearest Honda parts supplier only lists the seals from Honda how do i tell if they are Teflon or Viton seals or some other type.?
 

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think on the positive side, James Bond had to pay to get smokeas an option on the Batmobile!

Be careful takin gthat valvetrain apart, its complicated. No, its not running through piston rings, if so, teh compression loss would be noticed and it would burn oil while running.
 

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Malc Force wrote:
Thanks for the advice guys, Mynearest Honda parts supplier only lists the seals from Honda how do i tell if they are Teflon or Viton seals or some other type.?
I tried getting this information a few years ago from various dealers and all I got was blank stares! :?
 

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Viton is often orange in color. Teflon can be tinted most any color but is often very slick and shiny. Itsimpossible to glue anything to Teflon before its treated with certain acids. Try a spot of adhesive on the outside, see if it sticks. I think Viton will glue with Super Glue.

Vitons service temp is - 40*C to + 392*F (200*C) and is noted for gasoline resistance in automotive applications. It mechanically deforms above 400*F and is damaged within 3000 hours at 450*F to 48 hours at 600*F.

Viton is designed for gasoline resistance and some grades are very poor at low temperatures.

Teflons service temp range is:

- 240*C (compared to Vitons - 40*C)

to + 500 - 621*Fcompared to Viton at 392*F (200*C) max. These temps depend on grades and fillers.

Ive designed with Teflon well over its service temps (over 1000*F). Theres only one other engineering plastic that outperforms Teflon as far as heat and its horribly expensive (polyimide).

Nothing sticks to or dissolves Teflon - period- except some reallywicked:whip: acids. It has outstanding lubricating properties (good for sliding service). Teflon will not absorb water.

Teflon beats the pants off Viton almost all the way around and from the mechanical and chemical data I took these numbers from (from Du Pont, the maker of both) I see no reason why Teflon is not superior to Viton in valve guide seals, especially in a radically lower coefficient of friction against a steel valve stem. Teflon will not wear a steel valve stem. Also, Teflon tends to be "self-healing" when stretched then temperature cycled.


Teflon is expensive.....
 

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The last set of Viton seals I installed were blackish/greyin color. Most expert engine builders will advise you not to use Teflon valve seals in street engines because they will allow excess oil seepage through the valve guides.That is why they came up with Viton because it will work for racing or normal street use without allowing the excess oil seepage. Viton has a closer feel to rubber, but, it doesn't break down under heat and oil conditions like rubber does.

Vic
 

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This has been an interesting thread/topic, but the fact is that most of us buying gasket sets will invariably end up stuck with whatever valve seals are in the pack! Thanks for an interesting subject, I never realized that valve seals came in so many types. :D
 

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weewillywing, insist only on the best parts, where available,when it comes to your Wing.

Ask for a Material Safety Data Sheet for the parts you purchase and the material contents of the parts must be disclosed by law. (Unfortunately, anything less than a highly professional shop will most likely laugh at you or give you a puzzled look when you ask for one, but ask anyway.)

Vic
 
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