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Don't get voltage and current confused, remember voltage is inversely proportional to current, meaning the higher the voltage the less current you have. If your voltmeter is reading 14+ volts, then the regulator on the alternator is seeing the battery as charged and reduses the current supplied to the battery, this prevents the battery from being over charged.
One should expect to see a voltage drop upon starting then the voltage will build to max volts as the battery is charged and current is redused. If your amperage demand exceeds the capabilities of the regulator you will see the voltage start to drop and continue to drop as amperage demand continues.
A faulty battery will cause a voltage drop due to high current demand by the battery not charging.
To many lights exceeding the rated amperage output of the regulator will cause a voltage drop.

If you getting an excessive voltage drop then you need to find out just what is causing it, by replacing the alternator to compensate for the drop is a huge waste of money. One should think about replacing the alternator if they are installing equipment that exceeds the rated output of their existing regulator.
 
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