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Whats the best lubrication for the drive splines on a 88 GL1500? cheers guys
 

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The best grease for that type of application is Honda Moly60 paste ( or equiv) It is a little pricey but is the best product. It is available at most Honda Dealers........Gm
 

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SPAV moly 60 paste is available at http://www.davidsilverspares.co.uk part no 087340001 price is £8.50 per packet, not cheap, but then nor is a new final drive?? :waving::waving::waving:
 

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As for the Honda dealer around here, they don't use the Honda grease nor do they stock it. I asked them about the stuff when I took the rear wheel of my Wing up there to have a tire mounted. You should have seen the puzzled looks I got when I asked about it! I asked the service guy what he used then and he told me wheel bearing grease! I politely told them they would never remove the rear wheel or service my Wing!

I went to a "local owned" auto parts house that specializes in selling a lot of off road and tractor parts/supplies and picked up some grease with supposedly high moly content.

Since I have "mastered":cheeky1: the art of removing the rear wheel on my 1500, I will regrease the splines on a yearly basis. I can have the rear wheel off in 45 minutes, max. Hardest part is removing my stereo system that's in the trunk!
 

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Thanks for the information will source some after the Holidays
spav
 

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if! iiiif... you cant find the honda moly grease, head to automotive parts stores and ask for Molybdenum grease. its used for CV joints. which application is almost the same.
 

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Hi Spav, I was also told by a truck mechanic that the grease for the fifth wheel on the [back of the tractor that hitches up to the trailer] is even better than the molly Number for our bikes. So there's another avenue for you to check out. Let us know how things went, and have a Happy & save holiday to you and yours. Doug. :) ;)
 

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There are a lot of sub-standard (compared to Honda Moly 60) moly lubes on the market that will not perform as well as the Honda product. I suggest you need at least 60 moly and my research indicates that there are only a few of those products on the market.

That very expensive tube of Honda lube will last you the life of the bike - you don't use a lot per application.
 

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You can get 65% moly (approx) in the bearing houses, also. A Loctite product. Definitely not cheap, but a little goes a long ways. Ask for extreme pressure hyd. pump spline grease if you get the "deer in headlight" look.
 

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You can order some from HERE

 

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CV Joint grease is usually less than 3% moly... Honda Moly Paste has 60%.. not even close.


5th Wheel Grease is a big shot in the dark as there are so many kinds using calcium, graphite, moly, teflon, etc. The best Moly 5th wheel grease I could find was still less than 10% moly.

Locktite has a 70% moly product, but the easiest to find is the Honda product at 60% Moly
 

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Even Cat "hi-moly" grease is only 2%. CV joint grease about the same, and it's much more fluid. Cat has a dry moly that does an impressive job on grader circles. I've often wondered if that would work good on splines. I know Loctite sell a 60% spray, and a lot of Cat bottled and canned products are made by Loctite.
But, essentially, we're looking for paste, not grease. A thought.
 

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The thing about Moly is that it is a dry lubricant. Itlubricates when dry.

In the splines there is a lot of pressure generated and it "squeezes" out the liquid part ofany grease. With regular grease, the lubrication is lost after awhile.

With the Honda Moly, when it gets squeezed out, the dry moly remains and continues to lubricate.

The difference between Honda Moly (60%) and other moly greases (2% - 10%) is that there is just less moly to be left behind in the same amount of grease.

You can succesfully use other greases, but it depends on your definition of success. These motorcycles will easily do200,000 miles. I had 152,000 miles on my 1200 and I was still using the original hub and coupling and there wasn't any sign of wear. I have seen other peoples bikes that had worn out couplings and hubsat half that distance.

I know some people that say that you should relubricate your splines every 8000 miles whether your tire is worn out or not.Yeah, that's becausemost grease stops lubricating by then.

I don't do that. I just wait until I amchanging out the tire. For me that runs about every 15,000 miles.So I don't need to be using some grease that quits lubricating after only a few thousand miles.

I have a friend that doesn't bother with it, and he is having good luck so far. He's using something with a lower moly content. But I watched him once, and he coats things pretty heavy, so I would think he is getting more moly in place by going heavier. But for me, I wouldn't consider using anything else. Only the Honda Moly on my bike.
 

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Even experienced motorcycle mechanics from other brand shops will use and recommend the Honda Moly 60. At a power sports type dealer that sells Yamaha,Suzuki and Honda most ignore the wording in the service manual to use a high quality moly or lithium grease. They simply use the Honda 60.

Yamaha has a lot of problems with some of their shaft driven bikes. The rear drive on the first gear lube change at 600 miles will have many fine particles of metal shavings on the magnet in the rear drive, this continues up to about 4000 miles and never ever really stops. The shaft drive also has this situation, you can actually see parts of the spline wearing.

Moly 60 stops all this wear on the shaft, and Honda Gear lube greatly extends the life of the final drive unit.

Honda gear and rear drive lubes have a whole lot of research into them and are products you can count on to greatly enhance the life of your bike.

Unlike oil or other subjects where there is debate about this or that one, there really is only one for the shaft drive, Moly 60.

When you pull the drive every other tire change or so , that dry gray stuff on the splines is the moly still at work . Also the Moly 60 seems to stay a bit on the shaft spline, and not melt completely away. There will always be just a bit of the grease base still on the back of the shaft at the spline junction, and not all of it is thrown off and stuck on the outer housing. So it does stay around and work for quite a long time, and other products will all be slung off.

Kit

Which does make me wonder why the 1800 has not mention in any service manual about ever lubing the drive splines on the shaft drive. Not one word, the drive does have a sealed universal, but the splines still need to be serviced from time to time. I have often thought about that, and wondered why.
 

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Kit Carson wrote:
Which does make me wonder why the 1800 has not mention in any service manual about ever lubing the drive splines on the shaft drive. Not one word, the drive does have a sealed universal, but the splines still need to be serviced from time to time. I have often thought about that, and wondered why.
Neither does the 1500 manual. The 1200 manual talked about lubing the drive shaft, but they took it out for the 1500.

I don't know why they took it out. I know two people that have had drive shaft failures on 1500's. They were both on Valkyre's but still the shaft set up should be the same.

I make it a point to lube mine. I use the moly 60 there too.
 

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I use Loctite Moly Paste, the half pound can cost me around $25 some years ago. I consider the stuff critical for spline lubrication. My '93 has been lubed with the stuff from new. Continued the practice when I got the bike and last spring when I had the shaft out for a look there was no discernable wear in the splines after 126,000 miles. The only two sources I know for the stuff (though there is bound to be others) is Honda 60 or Loctite. Honda's manual calls for molybdenum content of 60% or better, moly lube and moly grease typically contain less than 4%. It's the moly that keeps your splines healthy, get some.

*One caveat, don't use the stuff on cylinder walls or piston rings, it will prevent the rings from seating because it embeds in the metal and prevents proper break in.

Loctite Moly Paste
 

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exavid wrote:
.....The only two sources I know for the stuff (though there is bound to be others) is Honda 60 or Loctite. Honda's manual calls for molybdenum content of 60% or better,.......

Loctite Moly Paste

I errored when I said Loctite was 70% Moly; it is actually 65%... (not that that is too important..)

It appears that the software here will not accept the https address as a link.. tried it in firefox ande IE.. so made it an attachment..
 

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Well, when my tube of Honda moly past runs out in a decade or so, I'll look into the locktite stuff!!!
 

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Yep, the stuff does last a long time. My half pound of Loctite Moly has been used to lube six bikes so far plus the rear driven flange every time I change a rear tire and I've probably used about 1/4 of the can. It's expensive but it's the only way to go on the splines. Honda had a problem on the early 'Wings with spline wear, they added a grease fitting to the swing arm early on because of that. I think the Moly Paste came out around '79 or '80, some time around there they changed the manual to require Moly on the splines. If you use Moly there's no need to add grease through the zerk fitting on the swing arms of the older bikes.
 
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