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Havent been happy with brakes on my bike (97 1500SE) since I got it and finally decided to have a look at them to see if all was well. Pads were about half worn and the discs had some wear on them ( lip around outside of front discs). Am going to change pad type, replace fluid in system and have discs skimmed. Can anyone recommend a pad type or any other way of improving brakeing??? How much wear is normal on discs with 50k miles on them?
 

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The EBC pads are about the best. Skimming the 1500 discs is bad news, they will warp from the heat in no time. If the discs are within the wear limits (I think 4mm on the 1500) then just leave them alone and concentrate on bleeding the system properly. The brakes on the 1500 take some amount of bleeding to get a good hard pedal.
BTW, did you get the message about the paint supplier in the other topic you posted?
 

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I did indeed. Thanks for the help. Just have to find the time to do it now.
 

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I'm looking at the Honda service manual for the 1992 1500 and it states minimum thickness for the front disk 5mm (0.20") front and 6mm (0.24") for the rear. If you have a very discernable lip and the disk still mikes out useable, the lip should be ground off.
 

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I'm no expert, but I've seen skimmed discs on GL1500s recently. One of them (front) had fine cracks and on another 1500 the back skimmed disc was very blue. It seems that the heat generated from trying to haul up all the weight makes the discs overheat quicker when skimmed and they are not able to handle it.
I guess if you are selling the bike you could skim them and you'd then be passing the problem onto someone else. If you are keeping the bike then just buy another disc.
 

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My experience with reground brake disks has been poor. I got 120,000 miles on the original disks on my 3/4 Ton pickup. Got the disks ground and needed new disks within 40,000 miles. Pretty much similar luck on my 98 Grand Marquis. I don't think grinding is worth the effort of pulling the wheel off.
 

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I am new to the forum. Just wondering at what point do the brake pads need to be replaced on a 1995 Goldwing. My pads are at about 1/8 inch thick. Am going on a trip in 36 hours and everything else on my bike is great.
 

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Some pads have wear grooves that disappear when the pads used up. Otherwise I tend to consider about 3/32" minimum thickness, 1/8" is definitely getting close to replacement time. What you have now would be okay for a trip as long as 1/8" is the thinnest pad. Often one pad will be thinner than the other on the same caliper, especially if your caliper is frozen and can't move. In that case one pad will be much thinner than it's mate.
 

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EBC pads are tje way to go it looks like.
Answered my question I was about to ask.
 

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I am considering replacing my front pads as they are at about 1/8th inch. I have heard several people mention EBC pads Where can I get them for an 07 Wing?





Thanks
 

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Follow up question. I have been reading up on brakes and have seen some are sintered and some not. I read in one place that you should never use sintered brake pads on a bike that wasn't originally equipped with them. Are the Goldwing OEM brake pads sintered? ANy other thoughts??



Thanks in advance.
 

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Dunno what came on the 1800 but the earlier 'Wings didn't have sintered pads. The only downside of sintered pads is somewhat more wear on the brake disks. Whether it's significant or not I don't know. I've always used organic pads because I believe they do wear less on the disk and I'm satisfied with the braking action I get with them.
 
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