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Discussion Starter #1
Alright so I recently have done a handle bar swap on my 77 Gl1000,(which is a PITA don't ever do it). Anyways I've run into the issue where the bike won't start, no clicking or any sound for that matter when the starter is pushed. With that being said the turn signal lights and headlight come on, while the neutral light and the oil light come on. Now I've had this issue before when I first bought the bike and didn't have a battery tender system. Once I bought one I hooked her up and let her charge, doing that again and hoping thats the issue until I get home from work tomorrow to see if I can get her to run. Thanks for the advice!
 

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Did this happen immediately after the handlebar swap?
 

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REALLY check the battery good! Mine showed full volts but when finally tested with a load tester it was junk!

When I just pulled my 82 1100 out of the shop corner I put in what was a good full charged battery I had just taken out of a 1500 and it was still starting the 1500 well at the time removed.
I went through allot of stuff and finally found the battery WAS the only issue! It turned to junk sitting about 1-2 weeks on a wood shelf!
New battery out of the 1500 and 1100 fired right up!

I also had no starter, no clicks, no nothing! Only had rear lights and dash as my fairing was off, and hitting the starter did not even dim those much at all.Other than tail light/brake and dash, rest of the bike seemed dead.
Would not jump from a big truck battery and even hot jumping direct to starter was not working.
Simple bike battery swap was all that was needed! Once I changed that battery she was running in 5 minutes or less!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So it wasn't directly after the swap, once I put all the wiring connections back together I started her up and she was running fine, I then went to the store for about 30 min and came back to a bike that was left on, silly me. So I replaced the battery yesterday and still no luck.. I ordered a new clutch mini switch because mine was frayed out, I soldered it back together but I still think that may be the issue when trying to start in gear.... Oil light is still on. I just want to get her back to running...
 

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Does it have power on the yellow/red wire at the solenoid when you push the start button?
 

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Multimeters

Hi, Jbravo:
Even when I have different multimeters (VTVM, digital, analog), most offen I relay on a sinple 15W lamp fixed with two alligator clips at cables end ( I always carry them in front right pocket). This is a trick learned when I didn't have the money to buy a multimeter.:ROFL:
On my GL1000 I even use this setup to set the right timing.
Many times a multimeter will show 12 V, even if the contacts aren't firm. The lamp will put some load in the circuit and will show very bright or dull, depending the connections are firm or if there are resistors in between.
I hope this helps you.
Mario
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Headlight only comes on when the bike is running though am I correct? unless this is the cause to all this grief...
 

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The head light should be on with the ignition switch in the on position running engine or not.
It should go off when you press the start button and come back on when you release the button.

Edit: Bike types faster than me.:surprise:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
hmmm okay then what could the issue be? all the connections in the left bundle are together and have all been cleaned.. unless I put them to the wrong connectors... but I'm pretty sure thats not the case...
 

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Any other suggestions why I have full power to everything but the headlight and starter switch?
The headlight & start switch both get their power from the black wire from the ignition switch. It also powers most everything else so if you have tail, brake, turn and horn it is probably OK and the problem is in the connection or wiring to the start switch.
 

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If the headlight is on when you turn the key on but going out when you press the starter, then the switch itself is at least partially functioning -- you have continuity to the +12V from the ignition switch and continuity from the switch to the lights.

First thing I would make sure of is that the starter itself is functioning. Take all the wiring and switches out of the equation. Make sure the bike is out of gear and put it up on the center stand, just to be sure you don't put a bike on your head. Connect one lead of a jumper cable to the positive terminal of the battery and touch the other end of the same lead to the power lug on the starter. It should be a thick black wire that goes from the body of the starter to the solenoid. If the starter jumps, then we know the starter is good and can start checking other things.

Now, we need to check to see if the third position of the switch it working. Put your test light or the positive lead of your multimeter in the connector to the switch (leave everything connected for now), power on the ignition, and probe the orange-yellow wire (I'm looking at a wiring diagram and that appears to be the right color) to see if you get +12V when you press the starter button. If you want to be sure, one of the wires (I think black) will be +12V whenever the key is in the run position, one will have +12V only when the switch is released, and one will have +12V only when the switch is depressed. Check both sides of the connector. If that tests correctly on both sides, then your switch is good as is your connection.

Next, I would check the solenoid itself. It has a positive lug coming from the battery, is getting ground through the neutral switch (orange-green I think?), and gets +12V from the starter switch through the orange-yellow wire that we tested previously. With the bike is neutral and the clutch pulled in, connect one probe of your multimeter to the negative terminal on the battery and the other to the orange-green wire connection. Set your multimeter to measure resistance (Ohms) and verify that there is very low resistance. If you maintain an air-gap's worth of resistance, then the problem is in your neutral switch somewhere. If your resistance approaches none, then the neutral switch is working and the solenoid is getting good ground. Check the +12V coming in from the starter switch by switching back to VDC on the multimeter, touching one probe to ground, the other to the orange-yellow, powering up the ignition, and hitting the starter button. If you have +12V there and continuity on the ground, then the solenoid is getting power properly. Next, check the positive lug that comes in from the battery. That should be a fairly direct connection and you will have +12V DC on that. If you do not, then there is likely a break in that wire or there's a fuse in that wire somewhere that is busted. If you have a good +12V from the battery into the solenoid, the solenoid control voltage from the start switch is good, the solenoid ground is good, and the starter bumps when you jump it to the battery, then your solenoid is likely bad and not making the connection when you apply the voltage to the electromagnet for whatever reason. If any of those other tests have failed, then you know where you need to look next.
 

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Hi, Jbravo:
Even when I have different multimeters (VTVM, digital, analog), most offen I relay on a sinple 15W lamp fixed with two alligator clips at cables end ( I always carry them in front right pocket). This is a trick learned when I didn't have the money to buy a multimeter.:ROFL:
On my GL1000 I even use this setup to set the right timing.
Many times a multimeter will show 12 V, even if the contacts aren't firm. The lamp will put some load in the circuit and will show very bright or dull, depending the connections are firm or if there are resistors in between.
I hope this helps you.
Mario
I agree, a test light is a very useful tool. I only use a meter when checking components and continuity, I always use a light to check power and ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Alright awesome I'll try all this when I get home from work, my other issue the neutral light is on all the time so I called the po and he said that the neutral switch needs replaced, is it possible that this is also contributing to the problem? I'm worried since my headlight doesn't come on at all
 

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Alright awesome I'll try all this when I get home from work, my other issue the neutral light is on all the time so I called the po and he said that the neutral switch needs replaced, is it possible that this is also contributing to the problem? I'm worried since my headlight doesn't come on at all
No it has nothing to do with the headlight, it could have a wire shorted to ground or the switch stuck, either way it should start.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If the headlight is on when you turn the key on but going out when you press the starter, then the switch itself is at least partially functioning -- you have continuity to the +12V from the ignition switch and continuity from the switch to the lights.

First thing I would make sure of is that the starter itself is functioning. Take all the wiring and switches out of the equation. Make sure the bike is out of gear and put it up on the center stand, just to be sure you don't put a bike on your head. Connect one lead of a jumper cable to the positive terminal of the battery and touch the other end of the same lead to the power lug on the starter. It should be a thick black wire that goes from the body of the starter to the solenoid. If the starter jumps, then we know the starter is good and can start checking other things.

Now, we need to check to see if the third position of the switch it working. Put your test light or the positive lead of your multimeter in the connector to the switch (leave everything connected for now), power on the ignition, and probe the orange-yellow wire (I'm looking at a wiring diagram and that appears to be the right color) to see if you get +12V when you press the starter button. If you want to be sure, one of the wires (I think black) will be +12V whenever the key is in the run position, one will have +12V only when the switch is released, and one will have +12V only when the switch is depressed. Check both sides of the connector. If that tests correctly on both sides, then your switch is good as is your connection.

Next, I would check the solenoid itself. It has a positive lug coming from the battery, is getting ground through the neutral switch (orange-green I think?), and gets +12V from the starter switch through the orange-yellow wire that we tested previously. With the bike is neutral and the clutch pulled in, connect one probe of your multimeter to the negative terminal on the battery and the other to the orange-green wire connection. Set your multimeter to measure resistance (Ohms) and verify that there is very low resistance. If you maintain an air-gap's worth of resistance, then the problem is in your neutral switch somewhere. If your resistance approaches none, then the neutral switch is working and the solenoid is getting good ground. Check the +12V coming in from the starter switch by switching back to VDC on the multimeter, touching one probe to ground, the other to the orange-yellow, powering up the ignition, and hitting the starter button. If you have +12V there and continuity on the ground, then the solenoid is getting power properly. Next, check the positive lug that comes in from the battery. That should be a fairly direct connection and you will have +12V DC on that. If you do not, then there is likely a break in that wire or there's a fuse in that wire somewhere that is busted. If you have a good +12V from the battery into the solenoid, the solenoid control voltage from the start switch is good, the solenoid ground is good, and the starter bumps when you jump it to the battery, then your solenoid is likely bad and not making the connection when you apply the voltage to the electromagnet for whatever reason. If any of those other tests have failed, then you know where you need to look next.




Alright so the only test I haven't conducted is the jump test so far but I wanted to let you know of my findings. The solenoid has .625 ohms in terms of resistance which passes, as well as above 12v coming to it from the battery. I believe the issue to be the right hand switch, had nothing when hitting the start button on the yellow red wire, as well as nothing in the red black wire, the red white wire showed 6.28 and the red maroon showed 6.55. Am I correct in thinking that I need to get a hold of a new right hand switch? Thank you again for all the help saving me from having to find a shop.
 
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