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Ok, on the center stand, it will start up ok, then i can go threw he gears no problem, on the road not so much. I had better be downhill, wind to my back and over rev to get it to go after a lot of clutch feathering. I have since adjusted the clutch. (loosen jam nut, turn set screw till it makes contact and then back off 3/4 turn, tighten jam nut, adjust cable at clutch for 5/8 of freeplay on hand lever, and then adjust at the hand lever for 1/4 inch of free play). Before this the clutch was almost impossible to pull! way to mutch tension and the set screw was actually turned in with preasure about half a turn. The bike did sit in on the show room floor for a bit. It does also have a miss at idle. I am thinking maybe check the fuel filter and perhaps the c0ndition of the carbs as far as cleanliness goes. Spark plugs might be an issue as well. Compression will also be checked. If im not mistaken, I have heard that the clutches and trans on these are pretty solid and tuff. If it goes through the gears and clutch functions on the center stand, and it feels likethe bik just lacks power on take off, am I on the right track to focus on the fuel,spark,and compression arena? What are your thoughts? I value experiance and bow down to wisdom. I know you folks have been on this road, or helped someone else who has. I also have a 78' Goldwing for a parts bike. Thank you in advance, looking forward to your guys input, it will be greatly appreciated.
 

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Service the clutch cable. Take it off and lube it.

Sounds like carb problems as well.

Running points? Replace them points and condensor if so. Make certain to set 'em up right or you'll think you have fuel problems masked asignition problems.

Number one problem I see for weak points or ignition on a 1000is the bike won't rev under load. It'll start coughing and spitting. Many think "fuel" before "ignition" because they think the solution is easier based on all the problems associated with the carbs. Carbs scare-the-hell outta people for good reason, but many times I've found the problem is in the ignition; primarily weak, dirty, burnt, ill-adjusted points being the culprit of whole or partial blame...

Good Luck with your new bike.. :waving:
 

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SEEEEEE!, that is exactley the point I was waiting for someone to prove. I needed that abstract view. Points and ignition never came to mind outside of spark plugs. I will actually check that out first. Now on these engines where are they and how accessable are they? what is the proper procedure/specs. Man, I appreciate you waiking me up to that. And as confident as I am working on carbs, I will prefer points any day over a set of four carbs!:thumbsup:
 

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Here's a manual for the bike. Should cover all unless using Dyna electronic or some other mod.

Before I start with carbs on a new-to-me bike after a once-over andfiring it with ether for a "well, let me just see if it'll at least fire" task, I'll start with wiring checks and then on to ignition. Without proper ignition, working on the carbs is a effort in redundancy. Back and forth; ignition and carbs, ignition and carbs, ...

I try to square the ignition away as fit to work then I'll move to the carbs..

Of course, there's other checks I'll do beforehand; compression, timing, etc..

If it has sat for a while, consider checking everything over and servicing all of it if the bike is going to be reliable.
 

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also , something else to check , would be draging brakes. any ideas as to when the brake fluid was last changed ?
 

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Captainmidnight85 thank you thankyou THANKYOU for that manual! You are a blessing to me! And I mean it! And yes i did check the breaer points and the left side was not opening so basicaly my f cylinder was only firing on two and pushing two, hence about quarter power seing as how two were firing as well as doing the pushing for the othr two and trying to run the bike. New parts will be here wednesday and i think that hopefully tht should conclude the weakness problem. As for the brakes they actually work real well. I moved the breaker base plate so now I am going to have fun getting timing back. I will try to put it back according to the old screw mark spots. It should line up. And I am going to avoid the DYNA, cost prohibitive and I am actually good with points. I like them.
 

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You should be able to static time it pretty easy. It's in the manual. You just need a 12v test light. It's dynamic timing that's an adventure with these.
 

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Set the points with a dwell meter while idling....45 degress (or 22.5, depending on which scale you use)

Set the timing with a strobe light (if possible) first..:cheesygrin:
 

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Dwell before timing .. always.Dwell will affect timing.
 

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that is one thing I have never done. I have a MAC multi meter to check dwell and no timing light. I can borrow one. Now just to learn how to use it. I have been working on vehicles for 17 years now and never had the need to play with either. And then along came a goldwing:baffled:
 

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yep-- 79 was old school.
 

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yeah, even thow its not running right now, the more I look at it the more I appreciate it. I want to find another one but I have not any cash. I do however have a fishing boat and a welder and some guns for the right machine if ya guys know anyone.
 

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If you're going to attempt to time it with a light (dynamic timing) you'll want a clear plug cover for the timing hole and you'll want the oil about 1 quart low. These things can sling a lot of oil out of the timing hole in short order. I had a spare timing hole cover that I drilled out and glued a piece of clear plastic into.
A new style timing light that has an inductive pickup (just clips onto the sparkplug wires) is way easier to use because the sparkplugs are down in the wells and the well cover kinda ties the sparkplug caps together. If you take the time to put some nail polish or paint in the timing marks (F1 and F2) they'll be way easier to see. It's not easy getting your head in there with the timing light in the way.
 

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ahhh ok i see, so when the engine is running it will turn the light on as the fire for that plug that it is hooked to is ignited. And what ever mark appears on the flywheel is the one that is having the breaker trip, and you adjust the breaker point to sink with the timing mark. Yes?
 

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I'll time and sync your GL if you'll replace my 4runner front end bearings!
 

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brother, i would in a heart beat! Get me a ryder van that will fit my goldwing and send me a 1.2k gas card and I will be their this time next week.:toast:
 

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static timinng is good per test light, points are now new and gapped to .016. now i have now power to the points and they are actually acting as a ground.
 

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just needed to wiggle the ignition key and the problem was solved. now for a timing light to solve the weekness at low rpm as well as overheating, i think thatmeans i need to retard the timing a bit but the light will tell the truth. Still felt great riding it down the road today for a bit.
 

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I just finished doing this process It is the best.



When you set the static timing for cylinder #1 and #2 relative to the F mark for "1" on the flywheel by adjusting the main breaker point base plate, you need to be aware that Cylinder #1 (compression stroke) will fire (just as the 1-2 points open) about 2 - 5 degrees BEFORE Cylinder #2 will fire when the same set of points open the very next time (180 degrees of camshaft rotation and 360 degrees of crankshaft rotation). By carefully observing your test light, ohmmeter or buzz box while rotating the engine through several revolutions you will be able to determine the degree of variation you have on cylinder #1 and #2 timing. Here's how to judge: 5 degrees of timing equals about ½ inch on the flywheel...5 degrees is also the distance between the "F" and "T" marks. Move the base plate so that you "split the difference"…one cylinder will be a little early and one will be a little late. You don't really need to keep track of which cylinder is early or late, just make certain that the "early" cylinder never fires more than 2 degrees before the F mark. If you just go "by the book" and don't follow the procedure described above, you can end up with 1 cylinder up to 5 degrees earlier than the F mark. This causes the low speed knock off the front of the engine many GL1000's exhibit. It's hard to recognize because it's actually a "spark knock" of an engine under no load, but only affecting 1 out of 4 cylinders. "Splitting the difference" is not a perfect solution, but it gives you an acceptable compromise with much smoother idle manners.

When you're done, set the timing for #3 and #4 relative to the F mark for "2" on the flywheel by moving the points sub-base (there shouldn't be any appreciable difference induced by "wobble" on this set).

Here's the second problem you can have, even when you carefully follow the workshop manual. The spec for breaker point gap is listed as 0.012" - 0.016." Without coaching, most people will aim for the middle (0.014") as a hedge against their less than expert skill with a feeler gauge. Again, I'll skip the theory, but if your point gap is on the smaller end of this range you can end up with a problem called "dwell overlap." Dwell is defined as the duration of time that the points are closed and the primary winding of the coil is energized.

Basically, you want to make sure that you never have both sets of points closed at the same time. If you do, the non-isolated nature of this design will allow a voltage drop that can dissipate the saturation of the second coil and cause a weak, unreliable spark.

Don't worry about the electrical engineering theory. Here's what you do. Aim for the "high" end and set the breaker gap at 0.016". Next set the timing per the special instructions above. Then using your test light, ohmmeter or buzz box rotate the engine through several revolutions (for each set of points). As detailed above, the points for #1 and #2 should OPEN at +/- the F mark for "1" on the flywheel. Now make an additional check to determine that they do not CLOSE until AFTER the F mark for "2." If they close early, you need more point gap which results in less dwell. Each increase of 0.001" point gap reduces dwell by about 4 degrees. Note, each time you adjust the point gap, you MUST reset the timing!

Once you're happy with #1 and #2, repeat the procedure with #3 and #4. In this case, the points for #3 and #4 should OPEN exactly at the F mark for "2" on the flywheel AND they should not CLOSE until AFTER the F mark for "1."

This all sounds complicated and I've described it in several steps and in more detail than I intended. In practice, it's quite simple. Here's all you need to do in a step-by-step summarized sequence:

1. Set the point gap for #1 and #2 at the max. end of the range (0.016")

2. Set the timing for #1 and #2 using the "split the difference" method relative to the F mark for "1"…early cylinder no more than 2 degrees before F mark for "1"

3. Check that points for #1 and #2 CLOSE after the F mark for "2"…if not increase gap, re-time and repeat this test

4. Set the point gap for #3 and #4 at the max end of the range (0.016")

5. Set the timing for #3 and #4 relative to the F mark for "2"

6. Check that points for #3 and #4 CLOSE after the F mark for "1"...if not increase gap, re-time and repeat this test

Once you get everything set correctly, minor maintenance is reduced to periodic cleaning and re-gapping of the points to the max. value. You don't have to futz with timing every time.

Point of clarification which confuses some people: The "1" and "2" marks on the flywheel do not refer to cylinder 1 and cylinder 2. Rather the "1" on the flywheel [and it's associated T (Top Dead Center), F (static ignition fire), and Full Advance marks] refer to all of these events for both cylinder 1 AND 2 and the associated set of ignition points for cylinders 1 and 2. The events are phased 360 degrees apart.

Likewise, the "2" on the flywheel [and it's associated T (Top Dead Center), F (static ignition fire), and Full Advance marks] refer to all of these events for both cylinder 3 AND 4 and the associated set of ignition points for cylinders 3 and 4.

Odd observation. I've worked on a few bikes that had the timing variation on cylinder #3 and #4 instead of the expected timing variation on cylinder #1 and #2. I have no explanation for this. The cure was the same…split the difference in timing on #3 and #4 with the early cylinder no more the 2 degrees before the "F" mark.

Another tip:

Contrary to some manuals, ignore the punch mark(s) on the eccentric breaker cam when setting points gap. They were not created very precisely by the factory and amount to an unnecessary distraction. Just aim for the highest point on the cam lobes and then set the points.

Final tip:

To avoid the unnecessary distraction of a test lamp that alternates between bright, dim and off - put a small piece of paper (like a section of business card) between the points on the side you are not adjusting. This will allow your test lamp to have only 2 modes: bright and off. Without this step, the activation of the "other" coil will make your test lamp dim in a distracting fashion.
 

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You my freind are an excelent example of the kind of wisdom that I truelly appreciate. Its guys like you that help keep classics like the monster in my garage the classics that they are. I will be taking my laptop into the garage (or printing your article) and following it step by step. Thank you verrry much man! The bike out of the hole was week. It did get hot (due to too much timing advance) yet when running down the road it was amaizing for the year and small engine size, even being out of tune. I cant wait to see how it runs after your help brother, thank you!
 
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