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as previously posted, pulled my wing out of the barn after 10 years. wouldn't turn over. pulled everything down to the pistons and found some corrion in right rear cylinder. i cleaned it up with 320 emery cloth. only affected area is the bottom 1/10 of cylinder wall. i was told running a flex-hone ball hone lightly in the cylindermay help after sealing the gap between the cylinder wall and the pistonwith silicone. ( the corrion is light and a couple of my friends who are seasoned mechanics seem to think that might work sufficiently well for the bike to run reasonably well). i am also scouring available resources to try to find a right engine case,or both halves with good cylinder walls andrebuild the whole engine this winter ( for not much money as neither i nor my wife are currently working due to the tough times.)

has anyone had any experience with sort of issue? or have a right engine case? i have a lot of time disassembling to get the point i am at and spent $200 dollars on various parts ( head gaskets, shocks, fork seals, etc.) i would like the bike functional when i get done and realize the best way would to have it bored and new os cylinders but i am notsure it would be worth the $ to go that route.



i am very much upset by this but am trying to presevere.



thanks for any input. little guy david
 

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Piled Higher and Deeper
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Whole engines are not that hard to come by and would be cheaper and easier than rebuilding..

But a light hone on the affected cylinder may be all that is needed to get the rings to seal.. I was a little slow to understand the silicone sealer part, but that is a good idea also (to seal the gap while actually honing to keep abrasive out of the ring area)

Try the honing first. I think there is agood chance it will run..
 

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I think you will find a used engine a lot easier and less expensive, than searching parts for an overhaul of your existing engine.



If your trying to hone the cylinder while the engine is together , think of the cost ( money lost ) if you have to find an engine after all this work.



These engines will run a remarkable numbr of miles . Its just NOS parts or aftermarket are very scarce to come by .
 

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These older wings are like the old Ford Flatheads. They take a heck of a beating and seem to run forever. Put your 1100 back together, forget about the former rust, and ride it like you stole it.

If, at that point, you are concerned about the rust area do a compression test, choke (none) and throttle WO. Do another compression test after a couple hundred miles. You'll find that the compression will improve and so will the performance.

Randaak has a thread on resurrecting old wings. You are past that, in some respects, but you might pick-up some great tips.

One more question: Can you turn the crank and pull the piston deeper into the cylinder to clean the rust area? If so I think you are home free.

I think one would be amazed at how many formerly frozen engines are being used with great results.
 

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Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
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+1 on just put it back together.
 

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IMHO the hone is overkill and completely unecessary just because of a bit of corrosion from sitting.



SOS pads and elbow grease on that cylinder wall will clean it up nicely. Make sure you don't leave any stray fibersfrom the pad behind. Slight imperfections, especially in the lower portion of the cylinder, will not cause a major problem as long as there is nothing higher than the cylinder surface. Make sure the rings in the piston are free and move freely, are not stuck, or have debri/corrosion underneath them. If so, you can carefully remove the rings, and clean the grooves with a appropriate size piece of wire held by small vice grips. If you decide to install new rings........break a piece of one of the old rings off and use that as a groove cleaner.



I'd be willing to bet you that if that engine has less than 50K on it.......a bit of work with the SOS pads and you'll be able to see the original honing marks again.
 

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Not sure on bikes, but old timers used a little( Bon-ami )not sure of the spelling, to seat new rings in rebuilt motors. They would put a tsp. of it down the carb and fire it up, worked as an abrasive for a short period of time.
 

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Plus one more for put it back together and ride it. If it turns out there is a problem, you can shoe-horn a newish motor in later.

Mostly, I suspect you won't have a problem. It's a 'Wing.
 

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I've resurrected a couple engines with corrosion in the cylinders. In both cases after cleaning up the corrosion somewhat with a bit of 800 grit wet/dry paper a compression check showed good results and both engines ran well with no smoke or oil usage after a bit of running to free up the rings which naturally were stuck from sitting around for years. I'd just put the thing back together and see how it runs. Mostly likely it will be okay for a lot more miles.
 

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Add another vote for put it back together and run it. These 1100 are virtually impossible to kill unless you break a timing belt. I would invest the $34 ($17 a piece at NAPA) for new timing belts and go for it. I also would run some SeaFoam through the carbs to clean them out.

:action:
 
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