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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone. I am new to the Goldwing forums and just purchased a 1982 GL1100. It is an unrestored, original bike and I am the second owner so there are no goofy wiring/modification issues. I have two main issues that I could really use your help with...

1) Starting - I went through the old/unknown bike startup procedures and I can turn the engine in high gears. Recharged the battery and now reads 12.something volts. Bike on center stand, in neutral with clutch in and kill switch to off (don't want to fire it, I just want to turn the motor over a few times to get the new oil distributed as per the instructions I read on this forum). I hit the start button and get rrr.......rrr...........rrrr..rrr... very slow turning. I know it could be the starter, solenoid or some connection in between. How do I go about a thorogh diagnosis to find which part needs replacing?

2) Rear brake is locked - The bike moved fine when I first looked at it - which is how I checked that the engine still turned before purchase. I think the towing guy used the brake pedal and.... rear wheel takes a ton of force to move. I tried removing the caliper (so I could sort out #1 first), but it is locked onto the rotor hard. How can I get the brake to release from the rotor?

I am sure I will find many more things as I dig into the bike so I will probably be a frequent poster here.

Thanks in advance for your help!

Jon
 

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Welcome to the forum Jon. I can't help with the starting problem but others will be along who can.
About the rear brake, the calliper pistons are most likely sticking and preventing the pads from releasing. Try pushing them back in with a screwdriver and that should let you get the calliper off the rotor.
 

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Welcome to the forum Jon. Sounds like your battery is at least going bad. The 12 vdc you are seeing is without a load, when you hit the starter, it probably drops to 10.5 or less. New battery time. Once you have eliminated that, if you still have the problem, we can work through the possibilities in a logical order.
Locked up rear brake, crack the bleeder valve on the rear caliper to release the pressure. (Be careful not to get the brake fluid on any painted surface)
 

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Welcome to the forum Jon. Sounds like your battery is at least going bad. The 12 vdc you are seeing is without a load, when you hit the starter, it probably drops to 10.5 or less. New battery time. Once you have eliminated that, if you still have the problem, we can work through the possibilities in a logical order.
Locked up rear brake, crack the bleeder valve on the rear caliper to release the pressure. (Be careful not to get the brake fluid on any painted surface)
Welcome here! +1 on everything jackjohn said. New battery is in order. Even if cracking the bleed valve releases the rear brake, a rebuild should be on your to-do list.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks!

Wow. Thank you all for the quick responses. I will give all of the above a try this weekend and post the results.
 

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just stick a 2x4 under the left bag and locate it onto the caliper and hit it with a hammer, it will free up
 

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First thing to do with rear brake really is to pull UP on the pedal and make sure it's not just gummy on the pivot pin and stuck down applying the brake!
That is somewhat common problem on these old bikes, once the pivot pin is cleaned and working free it will be fine for years.
When mine got gummed up at first the brakes only dragged a little and I had to pull pedal up with toes when riding, a couple days later brakes would not release at all after use until I pulled the pedal up. Course I fixed that right away, soon as I knew what it was causing it!

If it's not the pedal sticking, then do the other stuff like loosen the bleeder and gently pry the pads from the rotor pushing the piston back into the caliper. A strong standard screwdriver should do it.

How long has the bike been sitting, sounds like a good while?

Check the battery so see if it has power under load or volts drop low as mentioned. It could be bad.
Could also be the cylinders are dry and sticky or a little rusted etc..
Take out the spark plugs, spray a little WD40 or such in the cylinders then crank with plugs out and it should spin well.

If you don't know when the timing belts were last changed, those should be at the top of the list of things to do! Old belts can break from age, not just miles and wear, and a broke belt will mean a destroyed engine! There are instructions on the forum here how to change them and it's not that hard. From an auto parts store they are only about $15 each or so and there is a parts list here somewhere that tells what part numbers they are.
From HONDA they are about $90 each!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not the battery

As per the great advice, I got the rear caliper unstuck and have a rebuild kit in the mail.

I also got a new battery and had no luck turning it over. When I hit the start button, I get the very slow rrr pause rrr rrr pause... The battery lost power pretty quickly. To double check, I pulled the spark plugs and verified that in higher gears, I can turn the engine by hand turning the wheel. I also used the starter button without the plugs and it turned the engine slowly for a few revolutions and then the battery died.

Can I assume at this point there is an issue with the starter?

A little more history on the bike... This was a "barn find" all original and the first owner's widow said that he would start it at least once a year, but the bike hasn't been registered since 1993. 50k miles on the odometer.

I would like to at least get the engine started before beginning to pour more money into the bike - timing belt would be my next project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Current projects

I have a new starter ordered from Amazon and my caliper rebuild kit came in today so I am going to rebuild and reinstall the caliper, drain the fuel system and bleed the brakes while I am waiting on the new starter.

Jon
 

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Keep your old starter, and take it into a starter (Auto) shop for re and re ... After 30 years, these starters will have about 2 tsb of oily graphite in them. which certainly blocks them up ...
Repaired, it will make a good spare second starter .

I got my 1200 starter rebuilt and bench tested for around $30...

As long as you are doing that, find, and clean up the braided ground strap, and frame contact point... again, after 30 years its probably an interesting fuzzy green ... Bad grounds can also make for a sluggish starter.

SilverDave
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
By "ground strap" I assume you mean the main grounding wire off the battery. Mine is sleeved and is connected at one of the engine mounts. I sprayed some electrical connection solvent at the point and covered with dielectric grease. I have also cleaned off the ground connection with the block where the starter goes on and gone over the rest of the connections (the positive connection with the starter was very rusty and corroded).

Removing the starter with the exhaust on was an exercise in contortion to get the back bolt off, but I did it eventually. Are there any tips for threading it back in on the new starter? I can't even fit my fingers back there so I was half considering soldering a screw onto the end of the bolt and then breaking it off once I have it threaded in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Starter worked like a champ - now round 2

Hello Everyone. Thank you for all of the great advice. The new starter worked like a champ and was fairly easy to install (Despite my nearly useless Haynes manual saying it cannot be done without dropping the engine). The bike now turns over cleanly.

Now on to round two....

After the thrill of getting it to turn over cleanly, I thought I would push my luck and see if I could fire it up. No chance. I then pulled the outlet tube on the fuel pump, hit the start button and nothing came out. Checked at the petcock, put it to reserve and... nothing. Now I work myself back to the sender (never had a contraption like this before - only gravity fed bikes) and it is so rusted, it is barely there (see pic). I shined a light down the hole and the debris net is corroded away. I know that you are going to say that I have to pull the tank, but reading the instructions in the manual make it seem like pulling the engine in a normal bike.


While I am at it, I also took apart the rear caliper and both the pistons and the seats are rough and corroded (see pics). Should I just buy a working used one on ebay or can this be saved?


 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
derusting & Carb work

I bought 5 gallons of white vinegar last night and am going to try that for 4-5 days while I am out of the country. I will take before/after pictures.

Assuming that I am going to have to do at least minimal cleaning on the carbs. What are your thoughts about buying a kit vs. shipping them off to someone for rebuild? I have rebuilt carbs before, but only on gravity fed singles.
 

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Randakk's kit is about the best out there. It has all the rubber parts and you will need to clean and reuse the jets. Not a problem on an '82 as they are all threaded. The only place you can get into trouble is if the float seals need to be replace or the idle screws are not serviceable. In either case, you need to use OEM parts only, the tolerances are just not tight enough on the after market parts. These will be pricey but you only want to do this once. The float adjustments must be dead on or you will have a variety of problems. If you don't have an OEM manual, get one, again you only want to do this stuff once.
 

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Pictures can lie but that caliper looks like it can't be saved.
What do the other two look like inside?

You do know that vinegar is an acid and will eat metal as well as rust, so if the tank is as rusty as the sender you may be left with Swiss cheese in five days.:sadguy:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks SilverDave. I called the local NAPA and got quoted over $100. I can buy a new one on Amazon for $85 delivered. Here in northern VA, everything is a little more expensive than normal if you can even find someone willing to do the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
And a garage floor of vinegar... That would certainly be nice to come home to. Actually, once I got a light into the empty tank, it didn't look nearly as bad as the sender so I will keep my fingers crossed..
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for the carb advice jackjohn, I looked at the Randakk kit and, at that price, it might be worth to have the service since it is relatively not a whole lot more just to have them do it. Has anyone used the rebuild service before and have an opinion?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Came back from my trip, drained the vinegar and the tank looked a lot cleaner. The petcock flowed freely. I then filled the tank with water & baking powder to neutralize the acidity, emptied and sprayed some fogging oil to inhibit rust.

Next day, filled it with new gas and a can of seafoam. After several tries, the bike fired up with a low idle. After a couple of minutes, it was idling smoothly at 1k - after 20 years. Pretty amazing.

Now I need to finish up the rear brake caliper and go through it for roadworthiness and another old bike will be on the road again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Big day yesterday. I changed the cam timing belts and installed a new Jardine exhaust system. Took about 12 hours total. The Jardine pipes are a little loud, but a heck of a lot better than gaping holes in the stock exhaust.

Now to chase down electrical gremlins...
 
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