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Last Saturday, bought a new battery and put it in the bike. It was a sealed battery and the guy said it was charged full; it was not.



Anyway, when I turned on the ignition and pushed the start button, I heard a huge "pop" sound down by the solenoid. Now there is no power at all, but the battery is charged up by me.



I am guessing that the main fuse in the solenoid is gone. Has anybody had this happen?



Right now, 12+" of snow, wind and cold. Room to work is limited.
 

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I would start by following the power. Make sure that you have good battery connections. Including a good ground. You already know the battery is hot. The pop may have been an arc battery to cable. Check if you have power at the other end of the + cable. I am unsure where the main fuse is on an 1100, but I would bet the main fuse is in-line between the battery and the solenoid. If it is, check both sides of it for power. I am by no means knowledgeable about the 1100 but I would follow the power. Look for a point where it isn't. that will determine the line/component that has the "long".
 

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Not just the + cable - also check the ground cable, as well. Either cable could have been failing, but pushed over the edge by the surge of the starter's current draw.

The main fuse in the 1100 right next to the battery. Looking at the battery, it is on the right side of it, covered by a small plastic cover. It is often referred to as the "dogbone" fuse because it is in the shape of a dog bone. It is bare metal, and fails due to vibration. It's recommended that if you haven't already done it, replace it with a blade fuse - you can get a waterproof blade fuse holder at Wal-Mart for a few dollars, that has pigtail leads on it. The pigtail leads can be screwed right onto the terminals where the dogbone fuse normally goes. You can then insert a 30 amp blade fuse into the holder.

If you have good ground, and the battery cable is good, and the fuse is good, then do as Terry suggests, and follow the power until you get to the point where there is no power.
 
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