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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey

Hope nobody minds another thread by yours truly, I took a lot of folks time last time around.

Just was reading up on Stator problems and such, not really having any problem, but I found some melted stuff, took pics if anybody wants to suggest anything...ALL is working well BTW

I understand that the three yellow wires are stator related, the melted ones are on opposite side of battery, wires are not melted only black box

Thanks

UPDATE////the wire that is bare looking I pulled out taped up and put back on, noticed it had been in clear grease/ According to previous owner stator was replaced aprox 5 years ago.

Was wondering how long a stator generally lasts, and is it true that if stator goes you can have exterior alternator installed without going after bad one/

THANKS
 

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Where those red & red/white wires are melted is the starter relay. The best thing there might be to get a 30 amp fuse block and cut those wires, solder them to the new fuse and connect the other end of it to the + battery terminal.
The stator wires look to have been soldered so they are OK.
 

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A stator could last one day or ten years, depending on how much of a load you put on it. dont run EXTRA lighting or anything that pulls current. one thing to think about is a mosfet regulator.it will cause the stator to last longer.
 

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Junior Grue
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Where those red & red/white wires are melted is the starter relay. The best thing there might be to get a 30 amp fuse block and cut those wires, solder them to the new fuse and connect the other end of it to the + battery terminal.
Sorry to disagree Dave.
Yes it's the starter relay but it also doubles as the main fuse.
Yes the red and the red/white wires should be cut but the new fuse should be installed between the two wires. Doing what you said would bypass the main fuse, not good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everybody for responding! So I wonder what caused the black plastic box to melt like it has.

Not sure I quite understand the cutting that was mentioned, is this something that could affect the stator, or is this totally separate from that.

What if I was to do nothing?:)

As I said since photo was taken I put electrical tape on bare wire and reinstalled wire to partially melted box. I am guessing the melting took place prior to me owning, but uncertain?
 

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Junior Grue
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The melting is do to poor connections heating under load.
It's the same as what happens with the stator connections but a separate issue.
One doesn't affect the other.
 

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A stator could last one day or ten years, depending on how much of a load you put on it. dont run EXTRA lighting or anything that pulls current. one thing to think about is a mosfet regulator.it will cause the stator to last longer.
I would disagree with this post. I do not believe that the life of the stator is related to the amount of energy you request from it.
 

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Yes sir you can install an exterior alt. just look for the Poorboy Alt. Conversion up toward the top of the tech page... You can read it but I don't think any photo's are there anymore..
 

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Sorry to disagree Dave.
Yes it's the starter relay but it also doubles as the main fuse.
Yes the red and the red/white wires should be cut but the new fuse should be installed between the two wires. Doing what you said would bypass the main fuse, not good.
What I suggest replaces that main fuse with a new one, it has been suggested probably hundreds of times on this forum. And no the new fuse does not go between the 2 wires, it goes between the battery and those 2 wires.
 

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A stator could last one day or ten years, depending on how much of a load you put on it. dont run EXTRA lighting or anything that pulls current. one thing to think about is a mosfet regulator.it will cause the stator to last longer.

No, you cannot affect the stator life by limiting the load, it runs at full load no matter what is being demanded of the system except with the mosfet regulator which will actually reduce the load on the stator if full current is not needed.
 

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Not sure I quite understand the cutting that was mentioned, is this something that could affect the stator, or is this totally separate from that.

What if I was to do nothing?:)

You need to do as suggested or replace that connector and the solenoid or it is going to leave you stranded. Those connections are where the electrical system gets it's power and where the battery gets it's charge from the charging system. Just taping up a wire does not repair a bad connection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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Dave is correct. The red and the red/white wires are the same point electrically. The red goes to the rectifier and the r/w goes to the ignition. They both connect to one side of the main fuse. The other side of the fuse connects to the battery + terminal on the starter solenoid.
 

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Here's an article with pictures that shows you how to replace the main "dog bone" fuse properly with a blade style automotive style fuse and fix your melted starter solenoid connector and burnt wires in the process.

http://gl1200goldwings.com/techcenter/article1004.htm

(This is on the GL1200GoldWings.com site, which is a great site for GL1200-specific tech info.)

***
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here's an article with pictures that shows you how to replace the main "dog bone" fuse properly with a blade style automotive style fuse and fix your melted starter solenoid connector and burnt wires in the process.

http://gl1200goldwings.com/techcenter/article1004.htm

(This is on the GL1200GoldWings.com site, which is a great site for GL1200-specific tech info.)

***
Thanks to EVERYBODY, but I have to single out Wingman 71 For the very goot tutorial that even a dummy like me should be able to manage...Will start at once, I have Can Tire locally:claps:
 

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Flutie,

Thanks for the kudos, but it's Tricky's post and instructions on GL1200GoldWings.com. He's the man, all I did was point you there!

At any rate, this should take care of it for you.
 

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I would disagree with this post. I do not believe that the life of the stator is related to the amount of energy you request from it.
the regulator sends all the current to the ground, more draw even demands more amps, that was a bad design which honda realized and changed it in 1987. if you overload the stator you will burn it out. wires dont break in the stator, they burn into.
 

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Just a couple of things on this. Actually the 1987 GL1200s (mine included) still had the same bad design. Honda changed it with the first GL1500 in 1988.

Also, as I learned during the time I was fixing mine, you can't really "overload" a GL1200 alternator and get more amps out of it by increasing the load. This is because it's max amp output is solely determined by engine speed, not load, (the bad design you mentioned). It's the raised circuit resistance caused by degraded connectors/wires that raises the voltage in the stator windings that eventually causes a failure in which the stator windings short to each other or to ground.

Here's some good info from Stu Oltman, the Wing World Magazine tech guru, from the Sept 2010 issue on this topic. This was actually a four issue series of articles on the Gold Wing alternators that I'm glad I kept!

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"... the GL1500 and GL1800 alternator’s maximum output is affected by engine speed as well as the electrical loads placed on the system. For the four cylinder (GL1000, GL1100, & GL1200) models, maximum output is determined solely by engine speed. The four-cylinder’s voltage regulator, which is actually more of a diverter valve, determines how much of that output is sent to the (load), and how much of it is considered excess and simply spilled out to ground.

As used on the four-cylinder Wings, the magnet is not an electromagnet, so its strength can’t be varied. The potential produced by the alternator is therefore entirely dependent on engine rpm. If current supply exceeds demand, the voltage in the entire electrical system will begin to rise above the setting of the voltage regulator. When the regulator detects this condition, it diverts excess current to chassis ground in sufficient amounts to keep the voltage at the required level.

Remember, earlier I described the four-cylinder Wings’ regulator as being a diverter valve. The main drawback to this system is that for any given engine rpm, the maximum current available will be produced by the alternator. Some will be used by the electrical devices, and the rest will be diverted to ground. Regardless, this maximum output will flow from the stator to the other charging system components, and any increased resistance to that flow in the form of poor connections will result in destructive heat at the poor connection and increased voltage levels in the stator windings. If the stator voltage rises high enough, and if the insulation on those windings is poor, the windings may short either to ground or to each other, and reduced output or failure will result."
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The good thing is that you can remove these potential trouble spots for this excess resistance by removing the two problem connectors that the infamous "three yellow alternator wires" pass through and hard soldering those wires together at those spots.

The first connector is just to the left of the battery. The second one is just before the regulator/rectifier under the top shelter.
 

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Even with the MOD done, inspect that 30 amp fuse regularly, make sure it is tight, and maybe a smear of di-electric grease to keep out moisture, situated where it is, it can possibly get water thrown at it from the rear tire.
 

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Junior Grue
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What I suggest replaces that main fuse with a new one, it has been suggested probably hundreds of times on this forum. And no the new fuse does not go between the 2 wires, it goes between the battery and those 2 wires.
You are of course correct.
It was late and I was thinking of the modification where the blade fuse is attached to the terminals replacing the lead fuse.
With burnt wires that of course won't work.
 
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