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Discussion Starter #1
I need a new rear tire for a 1984 GL1200 Aspencade. I tried to do my due diligence by reading several threads before posting.
My main question is on sizing of the rear tire. The current rear tire is:
Dunlop 491 Elite II
MV85B15 M/C 77H

I've looked at Dennis Kirk's web page to try and decipher these sizes. From what I gather:
MV = 150
M/C = motorcycle
H = rated up to 130 mph (I won't be going that fast. :=)

Isn't stock size 150/90-15 for this bike? Is the aspect ratio of 85 vs 90 something that I even care about?

I know Dennis here is one of the go-to guys for 1200s. Back in 2010 he recommended Bridgestone Spitfire S-11s.
Recently I saw Pirelli MT66-Route as a viable alternative. I can get one of those for just over $100 on Amazon, including shipping, so I'm leaning toward that. Is that going to work on these big, heavy GL1200s?

My riding style: I'm not aggressive at all, so "grip" in tight turns is less important to me. I also don't put a ton of miles on, so I don't care too much about durability of the tire. Since the rear tire on an Aspencade is basically invisible, I don't care what it looks like.

Front tire: Dunlop K291T MT90S 16 (130/90-16)
It's a year old, and has a couple of thousand miles on it. Still looks great. (Yeah, Dennis, I saw you write this up years ago, "Replace them in pairs. I'm willing to throw away a 'perfectly good tire'." So I'm still chewing on that recommendations. :)

Any other recommendations?
 

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What's the date code on the front tire tell you? If it's more than 5 years old, I'd replace them both. If it still has some time you could find a match for it.

However, I think a 291 is going to be 20 plus years old and therefore downright dangerous. The Pirellis are a decent tire, just make sure the sealing surface is smooth and some sealer is a good idea, too.
 

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32 psi front/rear, unless max loaded capacity of 380+#. rides so much smoother with 32 psi in the back tire but shops WILL NOT let the bike out of shop without MAX PSI FOR MAX LOAD on the tire???? GD shysters, cant anyone read the owners manual, besides me, that states..... 32/32, UNLESS MAX LOAD ON BIKE. ?


oooops, forgot, no one reads anymore. tire is NOT coming off the wheel with the BIG "safety (inner) bead" that MC rims have. its a tire, not the space shuttle. get a round one ;) they seem to roll better than the non round ones. something about.... "lets not reinvent the wheel... if we don't have to?"


MotoGP bikes.... ~18 psi with 140# jockeys screaming to 19,000 RPM's? the bike motor is SCREAMING... not the bike jockey, just to clear that up.
 

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32 psi front/rear, unless max loaded capacity of 380+#. rides so much smoother with 32 psi in the back tire but shops WILL NOT let the bike out of shop without MAX PSI FOR MAX LOAD on the tire???? GD shysters, cant anyone read the owners manual, besides me, that states..... 32/32, UNLESS MAX LOAD ON BIKE. ?


oooops, forgot, no one reads anymore. tire is NOT coming off the wheel with the BIG "safety (inner) bead" that MC rims have. its a tire, not the space shuttle. get a round one ;) they seem to roll better than the non round ones. something about.... "lets not reinvent the wheel... if we don't have to?"


MotoGP bikes.... ~18 psi with 140# jockeys screaming to 19,000 RPM's? the bike motor is SCREAMING... not the bike jockey, just to clear that up.

Do you follow everything in the manual to the absolute letter?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What's the date code on the front tire tell you? If it's more than 5 years old, I'd replace them both. If it still has some time you could find a match for it.

However, I think a 291 is going to be 20 plus years old and therefore downright dangerous. The Pirellis are a decent tire, just make sure the sealing surface is smooth and some sealer is a good idea, too.
I forgot to reply to you earlier. Thanks for this info. I checked out the date code on the front tire. Shockingly, it was an old-style date code of 5 numbers. Those five numbers didn't make sense at all. Apparently in the 80s and 90s, they did date codes differently. I know that the front tire was replaced on the bike the day before I purchased it last year. The previous owner did it for me, because he felt the tire that was on it wasn't safe. But....how did such an old tire get on the bike? Did an old "new" tire sit around someone's dealership forever? Who knows?

Anyway, I took your advice and decided to replace both front and rear tires. I'm still working through that, as Amazon shipped the wrong tires. The sticker was right, but the tire wasn't even the correct brand/size.

But thanks for your help. I'll have two brand-new Pirelli MT66's on it before I ride it again.
In the meantime, I've been enjoying an '85 BMW R80 RT that my dad just gave me. He said he's too old to ride now. He's 92. He bought it brand new. My wife said, "Which one are you going to get rid of?" I said, "I'm still looking for the law that says I can't have two motorcycles to love." :)
 

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In the meantime, I've been enjoying an '85 BMW R80 RT that my dad just gave me. He said he's too old to ride now. He's 92. He bought it brand new. My wife said, "Which one are you going to get rid of?" I said, "I'm still looking for the law that says I can't have two motorcycles to love." :)

I have a gl1800 and a Piaggio MP3 scooter 250cc which is a hoot to ride.
I will never get rid of either one, unless I can't straddle the 1800 and keep it upright.


my son has put dibs on that case already. :wink2:
 
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