Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

I just got this 1984 goldwing interstate from my uncle and it will not hold a charge. Ihave bought new battery and all.Is it the alternator if so where is it located? Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
imported post

You're about to get blasted with ideas to solve this but since I am NEVER the first to reply on a mechanical issue I had to jump. Check the three yellow-wired, white plastic connector in front of the battery to see if that's toasted. If so, you need to jump the wires. Just cut the white connector out and solder the three wires together then wrap with some heat-shrink.

Real mechanics and gurus will be along shortly but that's where I'd start. That's what it was on my '85a.

Ruaidh
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

msplainnasty wrote:
I just got this 1984 goldwing interstate from my uncle and it will not hold a charge. Ihave bought new battery and all.Is it the alternator if so where is it located? Thanks
:waving::waving:Welcome to the Best Goldwing Site on the Internet msplainnasty!:waving::waving:

It's kinda hard to say for sure with so little information. First connect a voltmeter across the battery, you should see around 12V. Start up the engine and run it up to 3500rpm or so, the voltage across the battery should rise to somewhere around 14V. If it does the 'alternator' is okay. If it doesn't come up it's either the stator, the wiring from the stator to the regulator/rectifier or the regulator/rectifier.

The alternator is internal to the engine, there's a stator coil and a magnetic rotor in the left rear of the engine. Take a look below and left of the battery and you should see three yellow wires coming out of the back of the engine. These are the AC leads from the stator. Check the connector about five or six inches up these wires from where they come out. It's common to have problems with this connector. If it's melted at all or the connections are discolored it's best to cut the wires and splice the connector out.

First though check the resistance of the three wires to gound. They all should show no continuity to ground. Then measure between all three wires, two at a time to make sure all three coils aren't open and that all three have about the same resistance. The next step is to start the bike with these wires disconnected and run it up to around 3000rpm. With the engine running measure the AC voltage across all three leads two at a time. You should get three readings around 40-50VAC. If this is okay shut down and reconnect if the connector is good or splice around it if it isn't.

If the stator voltage read okay, trace the yellow wires up under the seat where it goes to the next connector. Check the connector for signs of heating or corrosion, if there's a problem splice the wires around the connector. If the wiring is okay to the regulator, track the wire from the regulator to the battery to make sure the charging circuit is okay. I don't have the color code for the regulator but you should be able to find the 12v output on the thing, there's three yellow wires going in and two coming out for 12V and ground. If you don't have 12V out it's the regulator.

If the stator is bad it's a major operation to replace it, usually done after pulling the engine. You really should get a Clymer Manual for this bike, it will give you a lot more blow by blow detail on testing and repairing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
imported post

Hey there msplainnasty,

[align=center]:waving:WELCOME :waving:[/align]
[align=center]:clapper:to the Finest Goldwing Forum on the WWW :clapper:[/align]
[align=left]First thing,pop your battery on the charger and give it a good full charge. Once it is charged,I would run it to a local parts store (auto zone, advance auto parts...) and have them load test it. Most will do it for free. Just because it is new doesn't mean it is good. If it tests good, put it back on the bike andstart the engine. Using a Volt Meter, check across the battery and let us know what the voltage reading is at an idle.Keeping the meter attached, rev the engine to about 3000rpm and tell us what voltage reading you get.[/align]
[align=left]One other thing, when you shut off the bike, which position do you leave the ignition switch in? There is a location called PARK. If it is left in this position, the electronics on the bike are still on and will run the battery down.
[/align]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
imported post

Here's another quickie test for battery drain... With the positive battery cable disconnected, and the ignition switch in the Lock position, put a volt meter between the positive battery cable and the positive battery post.. if you see any voltage reading there, you've got something pulling the battery down.. There should be no voltage drain with the ignition switch in the lock position..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
imported post

msplainnasty wrote:
I just got this 1984 goldwing interstate from my uncle and it will not hold a charge. Ihave bought new battery and all.Is it the alternator if so where is it located? Thanks
Msplainnasty, you have been provided some very good information in the above posts so start with those basic tests.

I will just add to check the 2 large (one red) & (one red/white) wires where they enter the starter relay (just behind the battery).. The large red wire is the charging supply wire to the battery & that wire tends to get oxidised with age &create resistance.. That resistance creates heat & the heat melts the white plastic connector so it runs down into the connection creating an open or partial open.

Look very closely at that connection & if the plastic looks melted or the connection won't come apart without prying the plastic apart you have a problem in that area.

A good & proper repair for those red wires to relay connection is to: cut BOTH red & red/white wires back to clean wire,, then solder them together,, at the same time also solder one pig tail of a 30 amp SEALED spade type automotive fuse holder to those 2 red wires, then solder a ring terminal to the other pig tail of that 30 amp fuse holder & fasten under the (+) battery post screw.. That will eliminate any future problems with those red wires to the relay connection & completely eliminate that pesky main fuse on the starter relay..

On a bike as old as an 84 this update could have already been done so don't be surprised if there is already an added fuse there.. If so disregard the above..

Twisty
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
247 Posts
imported post

Hi,

Reading Twisy's reply reminds me of my starter relay, I was checking the three yellow wires just after I bought my '85. I had the bike running, saw smoke coming from the relay connections. :shock:I removed melted plastic , cleaned the terminals and put new ends on the wires. Guess I caught that just in time.

Tom
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

Renegade wrote:
Here's another quickie test for battery drain... With the positive battery cable disconnected, and the ignition switch in the Lock position, put a volt meter between the positive battery cable and the positive battery post.. if you see any voltage reading there, you've got something pulling the battery down.. There should be no voltage drain with the ignition switch in the lock position..
That will work on an Interstate with no radio, but an Aspy with a clock or radio will have the keep alive circuit live even with the ignition switch off and show 12V with that test.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
imported post

Thanks a bunch. I'm going to try all of these things tomorrow and i'll give you all the scoup when i'm done. Thanks again.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
imported post

I thought he has an Interstate. 1st sentence says Interstate.. Did I miss something?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
imported post

Apparently Paul is reading the forum without his glasses on again!!! :cheeky1::cheeky1: :cheeky1:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
582 Posts
imported post

just saw your question, and here's a thought too......i JUST had trouble with my 1100...croaked on me, luckily i was in town, and had towing memmbership. Found out that the positive cable going to the starter solenoid was the trouble....the nut was loose on the solenoid. CHeck your cables. Lee
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5 Posts
imported post

I will tell you from experience. If you find that the stator or mag plate are bad and you can't drop the engine yourself or get a friend to do it you are in trouble unless you have money to burn. a new stator is cheap (around 80-85 bucks) but a shop is gonna charge you about 10 to 12 hours of labor at a rate of 50 to 75 dollars per hour. I had my stator replaced a couple of weeks ago cuz i just didnt have time to do it myself. I left the shop 1400 dollars lighter. so I sure hope it is something simpler for you. good luck
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
imported post

WOW... I'm glad I replaced the stator on my Aspy myself.. man... that's an expensive job if you shop it out..

When you can't do it yourself, you must depend on someone else, and of course, you can't expect them to do it for free...

I'm moving to Florida in about 5 years.... Perhaps I'll open a Goldwing repair shop just for pocket money.. LOL
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top