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Hey all!



I'm having a problem with the hydraulicclutch on my 1985 GL1200 LTD after a stall and dump in my driveway.

To make a long story short, I dumped my LTD into the hedge bymy diveway last night after misjudging my approach to the driveway, which is a rather steep uphill drive. I was in 1st gear and moving at maybe 3 or 4 miles an hour, when the highway pegs snagged the bush, directed me into the bush, and subsequently ended up stalling out as the bike wedged in the bushes.

I did't have the strength to right the bike by myself, and left it in the bushes by the driveway overnight. This morning, a neigbor helped me get the bike upright and out of the bushes, but I was dismayed to find that the clutch would not disengage, and I could not shift the bike out of first gear. We managed to drag the bike up the dive, approximately 75 feet, using a rope and my pickup truck,to where the drive levels out, where I was finally able to get the transmission into neutral, and push the bike into my garage.

I had noticed some seepage around the master cylinder a few weeks back, and had purchased a rebuild kit, so this evening I rebuilt the master cylinder and bled the hydraulics. I'm getting a steady flow of fluid with no bubbles at the slave cylinder now, but still cannot get the clutch to disengage.

Does anyone know why this might be happenning? The bike was partially on it's left side for about 6 hours, and I have had stalls in the past, but never had a clutch failure til now.

Is it possible that something may have failed due to the bike laying over?

Could there still be air in the lines that is just not comming out during bleeding? Could theclutch or slave cylinder be bound up due to the bike laying on it's left side for a evening or the stall ?

Thanks in advance for any insight anyone might have.
 

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roscoepc wrote:
Try cracking openthe banjo bolt on the master cylinder and bleeding it there. Every time mines gotten low on fluid and the clutch was not disengaging fully, that's been the ticket!!
Thanks, roscoepc!



I did bleed the air from that area when I first reassembled the Master Cylinder, but noticed some air bubbles in the reservoir after it sat for a while. I'll try bleeding at the union again, once I get to the auto parts store and get some more brake fluid (I used up the small bottle I had).
 

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William_86 wrote:
how does the lever feel? it try using some kind of vacum pump, you can make one out of a big syringe or buy a cheap one.
Hardly any resistance. I do get a delayed steady squirt of fluid at the bleeder valve with each pump of the lever. I think I will try the vacuum pump idea if they have any at the auto parts store. I'm convinced there is still a lot of air in the lines, and that I probably need to run a lot more fluid through the system to get it all out.
 

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johnmac wrote:
Get some help and gently lay it on the right side. You can even lean it on some bricks or scrap lumber, at the engine guard. Just lean it like it had a right side side stand. Then squeeze the clutch lever, hold for a few seconds and release. Do this several times. Tilting the bike to the right will let the air bubble to escape past the banjo bolt. When leaning to the left, the air gets trapped at the banjo bolt. Then have your helper help stand the bike back up.

John
Thanks for the suggestion, johnmac!



I'll try that if further conventional bleeding doesn't help. I may have trouble getting a second hand to help lay the bike over, but I have a floor jack that might just do the trick.
 

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oldtigercub wrote:
johnmac wrote:
Get some help and gently lay it on the right side. You can even lean it on some bricks or scrap lumber, at the engine guard. Just lean it like it had a right side side stand. Then squeeze the clutch lever, hold for a few seconds and release. Do this several times. Tilting the bike to the right will let the air bubble to escape past the banjo bolt. When leaning to the left, the air gets trapped at the banjo bolt. Then have your helper help stand the bike back up.

John
Thanks for the suggestion, johnmac!



I'll try that if further conventional bleeding doesn't help. I may have trouble getting a second hand to help lay the bike over, but I have a floor jack that might just do the trick.
Just a follow up. I tried something similar...by turning the handle bars hard to the right, I leveled out the "pipe" that leads to the junction, and got quite a few bubbles out of the pin-hole at the front of the reservoir. After refilling and capping the reservoir, I now have full resistance and travel, and the clutch works great!

Thanks to all for your suggestions,
 
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