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You know more about it than me but the manual shows the TW sensor on the rear of the housing behind the right crossover tube, the one directly behind the fan switch is for the gauge.
Dave - you are correct. Here's a pic of the three water sensors - top view of the engine. From front to back: fan sensor, temp gauge sensor, and TW sensor: Engine 5 - 1.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
for 6' 3" feller,
you need to call on the phone and get the recommended Life Support system :)

www.RidingIsWonderful.com


one of the very best things I did for my bike.
I know in 86 this was the top dog on 2 wheels but if this gives up the ghost I'm buying the new wing. Just thankful for what I got , no complaints. Also after riding 30 min straight come to red light my legs get charley horses so bad I can barely hold it up. Don't know if I cxan blame that on the bike or not but scares my wife to death.
 

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Fan only operates when it should. "More than it should" cannot be quantified. Where you ride, outside temp, road type - asphalt is hotter than concrete, traffic conditions, and such are contributing factors. I installed a manual fan switch that I use in the hotter weather when the engine temp gauge reaches 5 bars. Keeps the engine cooler in the varying conditions. I do this mostly when city driving.

The only other issue that you need to monitor is the charging system voltage. When the electrical system drops below approximately 13.3 VDC, the system will start to utilize the battery to supplement the electrical system voltage requirements. Once you are back underway the charging system provides power to the electrical system, and to the battery to top it back up for the next use. If you are in a lot of stop and go traffic, keep the RPMs up closer to 2000 RPM at stops and the charging system will be better able to cope with the increased load at the lower RPMs, ie, produce power to maintain the electrical system requirement(s).

Regarding your height, move the seat to the rear most position. The seat of the '85 Limited Edition can be adjusted. I'm 6'2" and can ride mine all day.

Had an 1800 that is designed for the average height ride 5'10" or so, but not for the over 6' crowd. Had the seat modified for my height, move back 2 inches and more foam so I was 2 inches higher - significant difference and no more aches and pains because of the cockpit ergonomics.

Test rode a 2018, or was it the 2019 - newer model whichever, GW and the cockpit ergonomics for a taller rider was better than the previous GWs.

Just sold a '95 1500, and found the seating straight out of the box (factory) to be quite good and no adjustment was required. Will say that I did have to get off and stretch every hour to hour and a half to shake out the kinks. If you were to go to a 1500, Honda lowered the seating one inch on the '95 to 2000 models. '88 to '94 model seating was one inch higher than the '95 and up models.

Good luck. Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Fan only operates when it should. "More than it should" cannot be quantified. Where you ride, outside temp, road type - asphalt is hotter than concrete, traffic conditions, and such are contributing factors. I installed a manual fan switch that I use in the hotter weather when the engine temp gauge reaches 5 bars. Keeps the engine cooler in the varying conditions. I do this mostly when city driving.

The only other issue that you need to monitor is the charging system voltage. When the electrical system drops below approximately 13.3 VDC, the system will start to utilize the battery to supplement the electrical system voltage requirements. Once you are back underway the charging system provides power to the electrical system, and to the battery to top it back up for the next use. If you are in a lot of stop and go traffic, keep the RPMs up closer to 2000 RPM at stops and the charging system will be better able to cope with the increased load at the lower RPMs, ie, produce power to maintain the electrical system requirement(s).

Regarding your height, move the seat to the rear most position. The seat of the '85 Limited Edition can be adjusted. I'm 6'2" and can ride mine all day.

Had an 1800 that is designed for the average height ride 5'10" or so, but not for the over 6' crowd. Had the seat modified for my height, move back 2 inches and more foam so I was 2 inches higher - significant difference and no more aches and pains because of the cockpit ergonomics.

Test rode a 2018, or was it the 2019 - newer model whichever, GW and the cockpit ergonomics for a taller rider was better than the previous GWs.

Just sold a '95 1500, and found the seating straight out of the box (factory) to be quite good and no adjustment was required. Will say that I did have to get off and stretch every hour to hour and a half to shake out the kinks. If you were to go to a 1500, Honda lowered the seating one inch on the '95 to 2000 models. '88 to '94 model seating was one inch higher than the '95 and up models.

Good luck. Cheers
Thank you for that! Some of it could be my age.I had the yamaha Venture and could ride 12 hrs a crack making 90 mph and 50' a jump but my wife says that was 10 yrs ago. I took off the highway bars on this one as the spread and position was uncomfortable. Gonna ride till it dies
 

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Dave - you are correct. Here's a pic of the three water sensors - top view of the engine. From front to back: fan sensor, temp gauge sensor, and TW sensor: View attachment 325749
Thought so, the TW sensor has a different connector, much better sealed and locked on.
 
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