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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took rim and new Bridgestone tire to have it mounted by a member of GWRRA who does lots of work for his chapter. He tried to mount the tire, but was not successful (he used a tire machine). The tire partially mounted, but is not centered on the wheel. Have a buddy who has tried to move it without success. We live in a very small town without many motorcycle resources. WHAT CAN I DO? We even tried to take the tire back off and the bead that is seated will not break.
 

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For starts, which bridgestone tire are you putting on? Complete specifics.
Going on the front or rear wheel?
We need full information as there are many different tires people buy thinking "this will work"
Get the information off the sidewall of the tire.
 

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It sounds like the tire is the wrong size. When you say it's "not centered on the wheel", do you mean the beads aren't centered on the rim, or that the tire shows more bead on one side than the other? Are these guys doing the mounting using a bead lubricant?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The tire is a Bridgestone Exedra 130/70-18 MC 63H G701 ordered for a GL1500. Yes, he used a lubricant. I mean there is more bead showing on one side than the other.
 

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Sounds like you need a professional. Some tires need alot of air at a high volume to 'bead up'. Is there a local auto tire shop that can look at it for you...sometimes those guys are pretty sharp.
 

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Try wrapping a ratchet strap around the circumferance of the tire, tighten and then inflate the tire until you hear both beads pop. Sometimes it'll take 65+ PSI before they pop
 

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Did you clean the rim bead area up of old gunk before mounting the new tire!?
 

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I mount my own tires and it can take high air pressure sometimes to get that bead to pop out
I had to get up to 85 PSI on the last E-3 on the front of my 1200 to get it to pop out

on my 1500 that I just went darkside on I had to take it to 90 PSI and lay it in the sun and it finaly poped into place, boy do I dred ever having to take that tire off
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, it has been a long and sometimes frustrating experience, but much was learned along the way. My buddy finally found the right approach and was able to get the new tire correctly mounted on the rim. Have read a huge volume of advice and experiences of others in the process and we are better for it.

Tried a long list of apparently well-known approaches involving C-clamps, wood blocks, ratchet strap, heat gun, etc., which we think are great in some situations, but didn't seem to solve or even help MY problem.

After trying several things we finally concluded that my problem was limited to an inadequate compressor that could not deliver air as fast as it was leaking out around the bead. Before resorting to taking it in to a tire repair shop, tried one final thing - and it worked.

First, disconnected the air hose at the compressor quick-connect. Then removed the quick connect from the other end of the hose, leaving just the naked hose end. Pushed that end of the hose down over the valve stem (with core removed) and secured it with a hose clamp. Then turned on the compressor. While the compressor built up pressure, sprayed the tire bead with Windex. When the pressure reached 80 psi, re-connected the hose to the compressor at the quick-connect. The sudden rush of air was enough to expand the (VERY stiff) tire against the rim and in a few seconds heard that beautiful pop-pop of the tire seating correctly.

One final note. The small muffin type compressor used (and considered JUNK and DO NOT RECOMMEND!) has very approximately the same tank volume as the tire. This means that the sudden rush of air could not over-inflate the tire to a dangerous explosive level. This approach might be ill-advised or might need to be modified with the use of a ball-valve or other means of control if the compressor had a larger volume than the tire.
MANY THANKS to all of you who responded to my call for help and for all the advice you gave. As stated, it was a terribly frustrating experience but all involved learned a lot, and the SUCCESS was worth all the frustration!
 
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