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look under the rubber mat there is vaccum hoses there that tend to break in the ells

also intake manifold rubbers culd have tear inside or possible slides sticking



mark:waving:



if that don't work i have some 89 carbs and some 94 carbs thats been rebuilt
 

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Don



I have a 93 that didn't want to idle smooth, had marked engine loading at about 1500 RPM with slow acc from there, and setting in the drive at 2000 RPM the engine would surge. Long story short....after a trailer ride home I found the auto shut off valve diaphragm had pulled loose inside. This allowed the vacuumto pull fuel into the vacuum system and at some point the hole got large enough that the vacuum could not keepthe valve open. (i.e. trailer ride home) A quick test is to connect the fuel line from the tank to the line going down to the carbs, bypassing the valve. Don't forget to plug the vacuum line at the valve.



Charlie
 

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Wingnumberone wrote:
My '88 also had an "altitude compensator" in the front right fairing - that I disposed of entirely, with no ill effects.
Is this the two green do hickeys or the black unit with the three brass fittings on it?

I really don't think I'm too worried about having an altitude compensator in Cincinnati.
 

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The green things are shot-air solenoids. Leave them alone, unless they fail.

The altitude gig is a brass deal that looks like a pressure regulator, and has barbed hose fittings plumbed to the carbs. It is rubber-mounted high in front of the right locking fairing compartment's hole.

Our last littlespin included Ocracoke Island, at sea level - and Mt. Mitchell, the highest point east of the Mississippi River (6,578'). The old girl pulled like a train the whole way, without the device. You should be okay, even if you leave the flat-lands.:)
 

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mine has done that flucuating idle also, i removed carbs and replaced the vac hoses, you cant replace them all, without removing the carbs, and get some hose from these high performance auto places, they have, the best hose and its cheap. heat resistant, gas and oil resistant,after that blance carbs, i did that idls great now.
 

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Wingnumberone wrote:
The green things are shot-air solenoids. Leave them alone, unless they fail.

The altitude gig is a brass deal that looks like a pressure regulator, and has barbed hose fittings plumbed to the carbs. It is rubber-mounted high in front of the right locking fairing compartment's hole.

Our last littlespin included Ocracoke Island, at sea level - and Mt. Mitchell, the highest point east of the Mississippi River (6,578'). The old girl pulled like a train the whole way, without the device. You should be okay, even if you leave the flat-lands.:)
Thanks, I'm going to try this. Did you just loop the line at the carb or in the fairing pocket.
 

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Totally going in another direction here, but have you looked at the voltage available to your coils and your computer at idle?

Recently I was chasin an idle issue on an '88... 11.4 at the battery at idle and abou 1 volt less at the Computer due to corrosion and weak grounding.

After cleanin the connections, the idle smoothed a bit. After a quick R&R of the alternator brushes, the idle smoothed-out flat at 800...

... Granted, what I was chasin was NOT a idle +/- 400RPM as the OP has, but the weak and oddly timed spark that I had was definitley causing the bike to miss at idle.
 

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HogansWing wrote:
Thanks, I'm going to try this. Did you just loop the line at the carb or in the fairing pocket.
The '95 carbs I used weren't set up for the compensator, so there was no extra plumbing to deal with. According to the aforementioned vacuum hose routing diagrams, that piece"went away" after the first couple years. . . . . . . . .
 

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Before you pull the carbs...Try this. Remove your air filter,on the top of the carbs,there are air bleed holes,Spray carb cleaner in ALL the air bleeds. If you can find the old Honda brand carb cleaner,NOT the low VOC crap!, use it .Let soak for 5-10 mins,repeat. Then take compressed air and a small-tipped blow nozzle,cover the carb inlets w/a rag,and blast 125+psi into each air bleed. Gas is going to fly into the rag,so don't smoke when doing this step.Once you are done,remove the rag and start the bike up,holding the throttle wide open. As soon as the bike starts,rev within normal limits,until the cyl's are clear,and recheck the idle. Depending on what carb cleaner you use,you may have to repeat. I've used this method on my '97 and my buddies'96 with great results.
 

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Don, I'm not trying to hijack your post but it's all along the same line-I think:?

Allwing, I am going to pull the carbs to replace all the vacuum lines, it was part of my winter maintenance program for this year. Winter just started a little earlier because it started running rough. I'm missing out on some beautiful fall riding weather this week.

There is a small bike shop that I've been going to that has a sonic clean dunk tank for the carbs. They want $52 for the process. He uses Simple Green and warm water as the solution. Claims that the rubbers will be rejuvenated and that he will clean or replace the jets if required for cost of parts plus a couple hours of labor.

Has anyone tried this before and what was the outcome? I was thinking about picking up an old carb on fleabay as a guinea pig.
 
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