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Hi guys! New to the forum and goldwing crowd. My dad left me his goldwing that he was going to fix,he rode it once before he died. He was extremely happy to have it . Now I have it and I'm triying to fix it up for his burial in 3 weeks, on a budget. If don't make it on the goldwing that's ok too, but I figure I'll try. Anywho, I'm trying to change the tire myself and have the dealer balence it, or have them install the tire and balance it while I do the grunt work. I'm doing pretty good just by the owners manual but, does anyone have any diagrams they could send me that could help me out? Any advice? thanks!

Shawn D.
 

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Do a search on rear tire change. You do not have to pull the bags off just unbolt andflip up onto seat to remove the back tire. #1 thing to remember is the bike will roll off the kick stand and fall over.Get a friend to help put bags back in place to help hold while getting bolts back in.
 

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Got any bookmarks? Searching for "Rear tire", "rear tire change", or "tire change" didn't do it for me. That might help, I'm at the part where you lousen the exhaust, I've already got the bags off, to prevent theft.

sd
 

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Hey Shawn, what model Goldwing is it? Also, you might be able to ask some of your local GWRRA members to turn up at your dads funeral for escort duty. Goldwing owners are usually very obliging in these matters.
 

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Here's the EASY way to get the rear wheel off of a 1500. It takes about 10 minutes (15 if you're not a mechanic). And you can do it on the side of the road if you need to. You don't have to remove trunks or lights. No electrical connectors to take loose. You can even leave your hitch on!
  1. Put the bike on the center stand. You don't need any jacks or blocks. Empty the trunks if you've got much weight in them.
  2. Remove the seat (two allen-head bolts on each side in the handles).
  3. Remove the shields at the fronts of the mufflers (two bolts on each side).
  4. Loosen (do not remove) the exhaust pipe/muffler clamps (total of four bolts, two at the front of each muffler).
  5. Remove the muffler bolts under the trunks (one each side), and rotate the mufflers down.
  6. Support the rear assembly with a jack or block (taking precautions to protect the rear body work). Open the side trunks. On the inside wall of each trunk, near the front, is a rubber plug (on the SE/Aspencade, the air hose passes through this plug in the right trunk). Remove the plugs and REMOVE the bolt behind each plug (one each side).
  7. Where the seat was, near the back, and just behind the shock mounts, are two bolts, one on each side of the frame, holding the rear frame to the main frame. Loosen (do not remove) these two bolts.
  8. Step around to the back of the bike, take hold of the trunks underneath, and lift. The whole rear end (trunks, lights, hitch and all) will lift up and pivot on the two upper frame bolts, exposing the rear wheel and axle! Raise it up until the antennas touch the handlebars, and secure it in place. I looped a rope around the handlebars and tied it to the trunk rack to hold it up.
  9. Loosen the bottom left shock bolt. Pull the axle and the brake caliper (lay the caliper on the crash bar). Slide the wheel left and it's out!
    The reason for the change in step 6 above is that when you lower the rear end back into position for reassembly, the two lower bolts will prevent you from putting it back down if they are not completely removed.
  10. Reassembly is in reverse order of assembly. YOU MAY NEED A SECOND PERSON to help you lower the trunk pack back into position. This is because it may be necessary to pull out on the fronts of the side trunks while lowering them, so they will pass over the top mounts of the rear crash bars.
  11. With support under the back end of the trunk pack, use a small mirror to look through the access holes in the side trunks. Line up the bolt holes in the rear crash bars with the holes in the frame. Start the bolts, then lower the trunk pack into position and tighten the bolts.
    The whole rear assembly is held on by the two top bolts, the bolts at the tops of the rear crash bars (the ones behind the rubber plugs) and the muffler bolts.
    The frame pieces behind the trunks do not have holes for the bolts, just slots. When you reassemble the trunk pack to the frame, you can support the back of the trunk pack so the slots are just above the bolts. Start the bolts through the crash bars into the frame, then when you lower the pack into position, the slots will engage the bolts. Then you can tighten them down.
    If you're on the side of the road, you can lower the rear assembly back down, put the seat back on, and lock your parts in the trunk while you get your tire repaired. This gives you access to the swing arm and shocks, too. You can service the whole rear end, replace shocks, etc., without disassembling the trunks.
Dave "Renegade" Haggard
Chaplain, God's Road Warriors
Christian Motorcyclists Association
'96 Aspencade -- Blue Beauty
http://www.newcovenant.com
 

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Discussion Starter #9
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The bolt on the right side of the wheel when removed allows the axle bolt to slide out from the left right? I'm having a problem removing the nut, I'll have to purchase a socket, other than that it's ready to come out
 

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Discussion Starter #10
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Well, I just finished the rear wheel, and I must say it was much faster than I thought to take apart and reinstall. It took longer to find time and have the tire installed than anything. I've just ordered a new front tire off ebay, and I'll start on that next. Any advice on the fronts? Should I do new springs, oil? Also, it seems to run OK, but it stumbles when I engage the clutch and I have to goose it, it gets a little better warmed up. I may have to do a carb overhaul this winter. I saw on a site to change the oil fast to drill holes in the caps, link below. The clutch is rattly too, which I saw someone else on this forum say is normal? :baffled:

http://www.wingtechtips.com/index.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #11
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Well, just got the bike on blocks, and the plastic off the front end and I think the front
left fork is leaking a bit. It's leaking onto the left brake making a mess and explaining the odd front end behavior, and less braking. When I would go to take off, the bike would literally lift up about 2 inches before moving and sink kinda low coming to the final stop. I'm thinking changing the seals and oil. I want progressives but, maybe I can wait until next year unless you guys think it's worn out. I more worried about the rumble coming from the clutch area, it's the worst just before 2k rpm. Clutch or Alternator bearings?

oh, and it seems to be running better, I put premium amoco in and it helped, old gas maybe.
 

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Shawn;

If it leaked on to your brake assembly you will want to change out the pads. Do both sides. Lube the caliper slides while you are down there. Maybe just rebuild the calipers all together.

The rumble is probably just your primary chain. Not to worry. Sync the carbs and that should help.

If the change of gas helped, you might consider adding some SeaFoam, Marvel Mystery Oilor Techron to the next couple of tanks. It can't hurt. Only help.

And most of all...ride that puppy. God bless your Dad for leaving it to you.



PS.
Add your Wing model to your profile so we don't have to hunt your model number to repond.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
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Well, they actually got the front tire done today, I was just going to drop it off. It caught me off guard because if I was thinking ahead, I could had it all wrapped up today. I'm not going to put progressives in this year, I want to change the oil, and perhaps the seals. The Haynes manual doesn't even tell me how to change the oil, and neither does my owners manual. I think I have an 1990 GL1500 interstate, as I have 2 antidive units. I've been looking but haven't found any writeups on changing the oil in the forks, if someone gives me a walkthrough, maybe I could do a writeup? Thanks everyone for your help, as I'm quite the newbie but determined to learn.


http://www.jpcycles.com/productgroup.aspx?GID=BF52B32C-E6A3-4367-BE59-DB7EEEBAF3CA

My dad did put some seafoam in, and boy did it stink for awhile. I can put the rest of the bottle in over time. Doesn't that stuff eat seals? The brakes will be ok, not that much got on them.

After this I'll be bleeding the brakes, clutch, changing rear drive oil, and motor oil change.
 

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hlndeerhunter wrote:
Here's the EASY way to get the rear wheel off of a 1500. It takes about 10 minutes (15 if you're not a mechanic). And you can do it on the side of the road if you need to. You don't have to remove trunks or lights. No electrical connectors to take loose. You can even leave your hitch on!
  1. Put the bike on the center stand. You don't need any jacks or blocks. Empty the trunks if you've got much weight in them.
  2. Remove the seat (two allen-head bolts on each side in the handles).
  3. Remove the shields at the fronts of the mufflers (two bolts on each side).
  4. Loosen (do not remove) the exhaust pipe/muffler clamps (total of four bolts, two at the front of each muffler).
  5. Remove the muffler bolts under the trunks (one each side), and rotate the mufflers down.
  6. Support the rear assembly with a jack or block (taking precautions to protect the rear body work). Open the side trunks. On the inside wall of each trunk, near the front, is a rubber plug (on the SE/Aspencade, the air hose passes through this plug in the right trunk). Remove the plugs and REMOVE the bolt behind each plug (one each side).
  7. Where the seat was, near the back, and just behind the shock mounts, are two bolts, one on each side of the frame, holding the rear frame to the main frame. Loosen (do not remove) these two bolts.
  8. Step around to the back of the bike, take hold of the trunks underneath, and lift. The whole rear end (trunks, lights, hitch and all) will lift up and pivot on the two upper frame bolts, exposing the rear wheel and axle! Raise it up until the antennas touch the handlebars, and secure it in place. I looped a rope around the handlebars and tied it to the trunk rack to hold it up.
  9. Loosen the bottom left shock bolt. Pull the axle and the brake caliper (lay the caliper on the crash bar). Slide the wheel left and it's out! The reason for the change in step 6 above is that when you lower the rear end back into position for reassembly, the two lower bolts will prevent you from putting it back down if they are not completely removed.
  10. Reassembly is in reverse order of assembly. YOU MAY NEED A SECOND PERSON to help you lower the trunk pack back into position. This is because it may be necessary to pull out on the fronts of the side trunks while lowering them, so they will pass over the top mounts of the rear crash bars.
  11. With support under the back end of the trunk pack, use a small mirror to look through the access holes in the side trunks. Line up the bolt holes in the rear crash bars with the holes in the frame. Start the bolts, then lower the trunk pack into position and tighten the bolts. The whole rear assembly is held on by the two top bolts, the bolts at the tops of the rear crash bars (the ones behind the rubber plugs) and the muffler bolts.
    The frame pieces behind the trunks do not have holes for the bolts, just slots. When you reassemble the trunk pack to the frame, you can support the back of the trunk pack so the slots are just above the bolts. Start the bolts through the crash bars into the frame, then when you lower the pack into position, the slots will engage the bolts. Then you can tighten them down.
    If you're on the side of the road, you can lower the rear assembly back down, put the seat back on, and lock your parts in the trunk while you get your tire repaired. This gives you access to the swing arm and shocks, too. You can service the whole rear end, replace shocks, etc., without disassembling the trunks.
Dave "Renegade" Haggard
Chaplain, God's Road Warriors
Christian Motorcyclists Association
'96 Aspencade -- Blue Beauty
http://www.newcovenant.com


Kick ass... I did a google search and found this. Worked like a charm..
 

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Discussion Starter #16
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Thanks for the info! I have already performed that trick and it works! This was an old thread, and I am happy to report I still have it and it is still a fixer upper! :)
 

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So what color is your bike?
We've probably pass each other on Sheridan a lot and not know it.
 

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hlndeerhunter wrote:
Here's the EASY way to get the rear wheel off of a 1500. It takes about 10 minutes (15 if you're not a mechanic). And you can do it on the side of the road if you need to. You don't have to remove trunks or lights. No electrical connectors to take loose. You can even leave your hitch on!
  1. Put the bike on the center stand. You don't need any jacks or blocks. Empty the trunks if you've got much weight in them.
  2. Remove the seat (two allen-head bolts on each side in the handles).
  3. Remove the shields at the fronts of the mufflers (two bolts on each side).
  4. Loosen (do not remove) the exhaust pipe/muffler clamps (total of four bolts, two at the front of each muffler).
  5. Remove the muffler bolts under the trunks (one each side), and rotate the mufflers down.
  6. Support the rear assembly with a jack or block (taking precautions to protect the rear body work). Open the side trunks. On the inside wall of each trunk, near the front, is a rubber plug (on the SE/Aspencade, the air hose passes through this plug in the right trunk). Remove the plugs and REMOVE the bolt behind each plug (one each side).
  7. Where the seat was, near the back, and just behind the shock mounts, are two bolts, one on each side of the frame, holding the rear frame to the main frame. Loosen (do not remove) these two bolts.
  8. Step around to the back of the bike, take hold of the trunks underneath, and lift. The whole rear end (trunks, lights, hitch and all) will lift up and pivot on the two upper frame bolts, exposing the rear wheel and axle! Raise it up until the antennas touch the handlebars, and secure it in place. I looped a rope around the handlebars and tied it to the trunk rack to hold it up.
  9. Loosen the bottom left shock bolt. Pull the axle and the brake caliper (lay the caliper on the crash bar). Slide the wheel left and it's out! The reason for the change in step 6 above is that when you lower the rear end back into position for reassembly, the two lower bolts will prevent you from putting it back down if they are not completely removed.

  10. Reassembly is in reverse order of assembly. YOU MAY NEED A SECOND PERSON to help you lower the trunk pack back into position. This is because it may be necessary to pull out on the fronts of the side trunks while lowering them, so they will pass over the top mounts of the rear crash bars.
  11. With support under the back end of the trunk pack, use a small mirror to look through the access holes in the side trunks. Line up the bolt holes in the rear crash bars with the holes in the frame. Start the bolts, then lower the trunk pack into position and tighten the bolts. The whole rear assembly is held on by the two top bolts, the bolts at the tops of the rear crash bars (the ones behind the rubber plugs) and the muffler bolts.
    The frame pieces behind the trunks do not have holes for the bolts, just slots. When you reassemble the trunk pack to the frame, you can support the back of the trunk pack so the slots are just above the bolts. Start the bolts through the crash bars into the frame, then when you lower the pack into position, the slots will engage the bolts. Then you can tighten them down.
    If you're on the side of the road, you can lower the rear assembly back down, put the seat back on, and lock your parts in the trunk while you get your tire repaired. This gives you access to the swing arm and shocks, too. You can service the whole rear end, replace shocks, etc., without disassembling the trunks.
Dave "Renegade" Haggard
Chaplain, God's Road Warriors
Christian Motorcyclists Association
'96 Aspencade -- Blue Beauty
http://www.newcovenant.com
Mines a 93, reckon they arethe same to 2000 but I don't have to touch the exhaust if I let the air out of the tire first.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
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Mine is red wine, but parts are so sun faded it almost looks pink! Probably passed each other a few times for sure! I live in Zion.
 

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Beige with multicolored seat cover.

Small US Flag near antenna bottom with a yellow NASSIR streamer, what's left of it, on antenna top.

Maybe soon we'll gather at the next DQ-M&G?
Parman, phwhoever & I so far have gathered, I'll PM you.
 
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