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I know there are a lot of unanswered variables.

1) Condition of suspension.
2) Personal Preferences.

3) Riding style

4) Road Conditions



But, what pressure do youprefer? Should youever go with zero pressure?



FerrariMX5
 

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I am 5'17", 275 with on me on the bike 25psi, two up 45 works the best.
 

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Thank you aquaman. Hmm you are 5 Foot and 17 inches.. that makes you 6' 5" in the American Standard Sizes.



I have been running 32# in the rear shocks (one up) I am only 5' 8" andweigh 165. This set-up seems to me to be a little too hard in the back and too spongy up front. I will try 25# and see how my Goldwing Responds!

In 1992 the front shocks were not air adjustable, so I am looking at Progressive Springs and a rebuild as soon as I can get time, money and bike on the same schedule.

FerrariMX5

For everybody else with a Wing, what pressures do you run and why?

All opinions are welcome!
 

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I suppose a lot depends on 'how' you ride.

I'm 6' - 235lbs. I have mine set at 35PSI when riding solo and 45+, when fully loaded, touring

I find that 25PSI or less makes for a nice smooth ride when 'putting along', but allows fortoo much wallowing in the corners when riding at higher speeds, somewhat aggressively.

Like you, I too have a 92 Aspencade with no air in the front forks. I changed out the fork oil this spring and discovered that my fork springs had sagged to their service limits. I cheated by installing a couple of thick washers to bring the height back up, only as a temporary solution. Nobbie was kind enough to ship me his stock 98 springs, which are still well within specs. I'll install those 1st and then make up my mind about whether or not I want to install Progressives in the front after I see how my bike rides with the newer springs in.



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You should put the bike on the center stand, add your weight, passenger weight, cargo weight. Adjust for 10% of total weight. If your total comes up to 330 lbs. put 33 psi in the rear shock. If you trailer you need to run higher, like 42-46. The owner's manual will tell you more. The front shocks should remain around 5-6 psi. I run 41 psi in front and back tires. 10% of combined total weight has always given me the best ride.
 

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Dusty.
I am all about saving Money when I can. I remember reading something about the front shocks. Seems there are really two springs in each tube and someone said they took the shortest one out and replaced it with a solid aluminum rod the same diameter as the spring. I am not sure that the 1992 uses a two piece spring, but once I take it apart I will measure everything and then make a decission. Adding washers sounds like it would also be a good solution. Can the springs be stretched out again by hanging heavy weights on them and letting them hang for a few days/weeks? I figure just changing the oil will make a big difference. 83,000 miles and 17 years of carrying the weight might make for a weakened/softer/wornout spring. Replacements are about $100.00 Maintainence is starting to pull some much needed funds from other necessities.

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Yes, they are a 2 spring affair in each tube.

I doubt that there is any 'safe' way of 'stretching' the springs. The extra washers acts like adding 'preload'

I have found that when you pump up the rear shock to 'stiffen' themup to help improve handlingand you get a bit aggressive in the high speedturns/sweepers, the weaker stockfork springs become apparent and can be quite scary/dangerous when combined with 'wind turbulence' from trucks, due to the wallowing, softly sprung front end. :shock:I have learned what the 'limits' of my current set-up are and stay within them.

I think when the bike is down for the season, I'll install the newer springs nobbie graciously 'donated' to me, along with some 20w fork oil, overfilled by 5cc on each tube and see how they 'perform' then. If I don't see much improvement, I'll go with the Progressives.

New progressives, besides being 'beefier',are a bit cheaper than the stock springs and are warranted for life. There are ways to subtly change their 'ride' so they ride a little 'softer'

Dusty
 

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Hi Shnev, I thought all this while only rear shock is adjustable. Mine is 94SE and only the rear is adjustable.
 

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Rahim, are you sure? The specifications for a 94 SE say 41mm air assisted forks. Turn your handle bars to the side and turn the little plastic caps counterclockwise. That will expose the valve stems. If you don't have them I would be stumped. If you have them and add air make sure you use a low pressure hand pump.
 

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I just change my 95 SE to progressive springs and I find the ride very bouncy I see the headlights flicker on road signs. I am not happy at this time with the ride. For those that have changed to progressive do they get better with a little ride time I have about 200 miles on them now and will have about 700 this nex week.
 

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charliewiskey wrote:
I just change my 95 SE to progressive springs and I find the ride very bouncy I see the headlights flicker on road signs. I am not happy at this time with the ride. For those that have changed to progressive do they get better with a little ride time I have about 200 miles on them now and will have about 700 this nex week.
By 'bouncy', do you mean harsh/choppy riding, or too soft?

If the former, you can change the fork oil to a lighter weight oil and when you refill the forks, I'd try underfilling them by 10cc per tube. That should smooth things out a bit

This is taken from the Progressive Site:




[align=left]Fine Tuning


[/align]
[align=left]Pre-load: Spacer length can be decreased to lower the ride height and soften the ride or increased to raise the ride height and stiffen the ride. Adjust in 1/4" increments.
[/align]

[align=left]Fork Oil: Unless otherwise noted we recommend the stock oil viscosity and level. Oil viscosity can be changed to alter damping. Heavier oil to increase damping. Lighter oil to decrease damping. Increase in 5 weight increments (i.e. from 10 weight to 15 weight.) Oil viscosity will have more effect on rebound damping than compression damping, too high a viscosity can create harshness on sharp edge bumps.
[/align]

[align=left]The oil level also affects the ride, too high an oil level and the forks will feel too stiff, too low an oil height and the bike will bottom and feel soft or dive.
[/align]

[align=left]Air pressure: Progressive fork springs are desgned to be used with
no air pressure under normal conditions. A few pounds of air can make a difference, so add air in small increments.
[/align]
[align=left]HTH, Dusty[/align]
 
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