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Discussion Starter #1
I removed one fork cap and cannot get it back on. Stock spring sticks up out of the tube way too much and I cannot safely press down on the cap with a wood block or a socket wrench.
Would anyone know or have the tool Honda must use to do this ?
 

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Push down hard and turn counter clockwise until you feel it click Then thread it on.
I have also heard of people taking the springs out and putting the cap back on marking the cap and the tube where the threads catch. Then put the spring back in and line up your marks and do as stated above.
 

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It helps if the cap has a fitting hole, to drop a phillips screwdriver down to keep spring under cap and use deep well socket. When I do it, plank across my chest, recess to hold top of speed wrench in place, and I stand on pegs and put weight into plank.
 

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Push down hard and turn counter clockwise until you feel it click Then thread it on.
I have also heard of people taking the springs out and putting the cap back on marking the cap and the tube where the threads catch. Then put the spring back in and line up your marks and do as stated above.

That's the way I did it on my 1200. With the bike on the center stand. put a scissors jack under the engine to allow the fork tubes to extend completely.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The Long Phillips screwdriver through the center hole is an excellent idea for stability but alas, there is just too much spring to deal with I cannot push it down far enough to engage the threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the links to the various spring compressing tools but I am trying to do this without removing the fork tube from the triple clamps if possible
 

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What I have done in the past with great success is, remove the windshield.
Stand on the rider foot pegs.
Use a Speed Handle with the appropriate socket on it.

Make sure there is a jack or something under the engine so that the forks stay fully extended.
Have a helper to steady you and the motorcycle.
Use your body weight to press down on the speed handle and get the fork cap in place.
As other have said, rotate it backwards until you feel the threads of the cap and fork tube click.
Then rotate clocklise carefully. You do not want to cross thread those very fine threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I may be heading towards obtaining the Honda tool. Anyone here have one available for me to use ? I will pay shipping both ways unless someone would sell ?
Thanks to all Wingers for advice on this. Learned my lesson the hard way..... didn't know that the 1500 stock springs protrude over 4 inches from the tubes.
 

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Just replaced the fork springs on my '95 1500 with Progressive springs. Don't know if I had OEM or an aftermarket spring installed but it only protruded just under 1" 5/8". Attached pictures of spring preload. First pic shows old spring preload, the second is new Progressive spring preload. The third picture shows the old spring and new Progressive.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #14
After doing some research it appears that Honda change to a single progressive spring starting with year 1995. My bike is a 1994 with the old-style two piece spring set up in each leg with a washer or spacer between the two springs. This is the same set up as I had in my 1986 GL 1200 I. When I changed springs in that 1200, the stock springs only stuck up the same amount as yours are showing here. But that bike had 34,000 miles on it. My 1994 GL 1500 SE, has only 8500 original miles on it and I think part of this issue is the fact that those springs are not sacked out yet and this is why they are sticking out so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
After eyeballing my front end, I may be able to use the compression tool by simply loosening the fork tubes in the triple clamps and sliding the entire front end of the bike upwards to get the top of the tube protruding about 6 inches or so up towards the handlebars that way there would be plenty of room to clamp the tool on the top of the tube. Shouldn't have to disassemble anything on the front end.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If I cannot borrow a Honda spring compressor tool, I might as well just spend $100 and buy a pair of progressive Springs because I know I can put the caps back on easily with those. Buying the spring compressor tool outright is $200 , a pair of progressive Springs is $100.
 

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I could be a smartass and say that all you need is a fat friend to hold the socket wrench while pushing it down and you could direct the cap onto the threads easy enough, but that would be WRONG!:surprise:>:)

In my former '95 GL1500's forks I was pleased to find the Progressive Suspension springs when it was time for new seals and bushings (@118,000 mis.) Much better ride than the two-spring set-up on my '85 GL1200 and much easier to get the fork cap on. I'd get the Progressives. AND, if you don't already have one, I'd get a really beefy fork brace. I never even aired-up (to 7 psi) my GL1500 forks; rode perfectly on just the springs and hydraulics of the forks.
 

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1984 GL1200 front fork spring

This is what I did to flush and refill the front fork oil. I was going to replace the seals but it stopped leaking and held pressure. I wrapped a towel around the tube cap AND ratchet to prevent the cap from flying off. Still had some excitement when removing the fork caps, I forgot to jack up the bike! When I took the second cap off, the whole front dropped down! Deep breath, all well. Jacked it up, used a scissor jack, I don’t trust hydraulics to hold for extended lengths of time and wider top and base make it more stable. Then I removed the wheel since I’m going to be replacing the tire anyway, it made it easier to drain the oil.
Front fork oil replaced. Used transmission fluid and a little of Lucas transmission stop leak. It was a bit of a challenge to get the caps back on, I didn’t take the forks off the bike. Note to engineers, tapering the upper spring so it fits IN the cap would have made it much easier and less exciting. I used a gear puller, drilled a small, shallow punch mark (not all the way thru) in the center of the cap to keep gear puller from drifting. A screw clamp kept puller from spreading and popping loose. Took a few tries to get the right spot, but was able to pull the cap down into place. Back it up a half turn to line up threads and tighten down. Update, a week later still holding pressure and no leak! (Actually, I did this over a year ago, still good.)
 

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