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cost of shipping plus $10.00
Since I went up to 2002 after the 1500 got totaled it is no longer doing me any good. I think I should be on the lookout for a GL1800 repair manual myself
Sorry I haven't gotten back to you. Yes I am interested in buying the GL1500 manual. Does it cover 1997 Goldwings? And how shall I purchase this from you? Money Order? PayPal? Ebay? Send me a PM (private message) and I'll PM you the information you might need...or give me a ring...I can PM you my mobile number. How much will shipping cost?

Joe
I just went and grabbed my book, it's for 1988 - 1992
Not sure how useful it would be
 

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I just went and grabbed my book, it's for 1988 - 1992
Not sure how useful it would be
There are differences regarding what is controlled by the 30-amp and 55-amp fuses between the 1988 - 1992 manual and the 1993 - 2000 manuals.

Also differences regarding what is controlled by the Tail Main Relay # 3.

Most other items would be about the same.

If I had a 1997, I would want a manual with the correct electrical schematics.....but that's just me............!!
 

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Discussion Starter #24
My coolant temp sensor (under the right intake manifold) for my GL1500 came in today. Does anyone have instructions on how to replace the sensor? I'm hoping this might be the cause of poor fuel mileage. I'm still going to remove the carbs (to replace the float needles) and the coils (to check for cracks and to perform an ohms test).

Has anyone ever replaced the sensor in question? If so, could you provide instructions? I do not have a book for the 1997 GL1500

Joe
 

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My coolant temp sensor (under the right intake manifold) for my GL1500 came in today. Does anyone have instructions on how to replace the sensor? I'm hoping this might be the cause of poor fuel mileage. I'm still going to remove the carbs (to replace the float needles) and the coils (to check for cracks and to perform an ohms test).

Has anyone ever replaced the sensor in question? If so, could you provide instructions? I do not have a book for the 1997 GL1500

Joe

As I recall, you need to remove the Right Fan Housing, then just reach in to unscrew it for replacing... probably want to drain the coolant first.




 

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It's been a while, and I don't remember all the details, but we had to remove the tupperware from the front of the bike, the sides of the bike, and the top of the bike. You need to remove the cooling fan on the right side - it can be a chore to get it out, and back in. With the fan out of the way you can reach in and grab the sensor - we didn't have to drain the coolant, but a bit will leak out when you remove the sensor. Once you get it all back together you want to start the engine, WITHOUT TOUCHING THE THROTTLE. Let it idle until the fans come on and go off - this resets the engine computer. If you haven't drained the coolant, then some will have dropped onto the engine while you were swapping the sensor - this will generate copious amounts of steam while the engine is running; don't worry - it'll clear up!


I wish I had thought to take a bunch of photos to do a how-to article...
 

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I don't know where to start, the temp sensor will not effect fuel mpg. If the floats are leaking you need to fix the carb's and maybe change the plug's if they show sign's that they were running rich. Check the carb diaphragms for leaks, they will cause the bike to not take gas. Expensive $200.00 for both only buy the Honda OEM. Ask how I know. After you get the bike running with the carb's fixed balance the carbs with each other. You need some kind of gauge, I bought some with fluid in them and you set one carb to the other. I could not balance them by ear or other methods. Once you do all that start looking at the coils and wire's. I think your carbs are not right and look for vacuum leaks the hose's under the carbs and the hose's from the left head. and all the other hose's. The carb's have to be right or that bike will not run right. also your going to have the fan out to replace the sensor might as well pull the other one and fix the carb's. Just my 2 cents
 

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I don't know where to start, the temp sensor will not effect fuel mpg. If the floats are leaking you need to fix the carb's and maybe change the plug's if they show sign's that they were running rich. Check the carb diaphragms for leaks, they will cause the bike to not take gas. Expensive $200.00 for both only buy the Honda OEM. Ask how I know. After you get the bike running with the carb's fixed balance the carbs with each other. You need some kind of gauge, I bought some with fluid in them and you set one carb to the other. I could not balance them by ear or other methods. Once you do all that start looking at the coils and wire's. I think your carbs are not right and look for vacuum leaks the hose's under the carbs and the hose's from the left head. and all the other hose's. The carb's have to be right or that bike will not run right. also your going to have the fan out to replace the sensor might as well pull the other one and fix the carb's. Just my 2 cents
Fans don't need to be removed to do carb work.....!!

Plus the left fan is more difficult to remove/replace than the right fan.
 

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DBohrer, you are right about the fans, left is much harder to get out and in. There is a bracket in the back , upper right side that if you take that bolt out it gives a little slack to get the fan back in. Thats sitting and facing the left fan. Having both fan's out makes it a little better for me. Those's pages from the manually should help him change that sensor. I replaced my jet's in the carb's with what was in a kit the main jets were 48's the bike would not accelerate and would bog down if I rolled the throttle on to fast. I put the stock 58 jet's back in and replaced the diaphragms that was over 2 years ago and no problems. I get 35 to 39 mpg depends on where I'm going. I do think different years had different size main jets because of smog law's. I have found if I try to fix to many things at once I don't have much luck. That's what I was trying to say, get the carb's right and vacuum lines back where they go and the bike should run. If not look at the spark. Works for me but I just guessing.
 

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GoldwingA1500
Joe:

I have a set of coils with the spark plug wires for an 88 Wing. Coils are the same as 97 but only some wires are the same according to part numbers, but still might work okay. The wires on 88 could be shorter or longer..... i don't know.

If you need coils let me know. Wires will be attached so if they are the right lengths or not they will be included anyhow. $20 plus shipping.
 

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...How do I delete the fuel petcock?...

You need to connect Hose#20 directly to the Fuel Filter #2, thereby by-passing Hose#17 and the auto shut-off valve#4.
It's easy... takes all of 1 minute, once you've removed the plastic radio housing.


 

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Discussion Starter #33
GoldwingA1500
Joe:

I have a set of coils with the spark plug wires for an 88 Wing. Coils are the same as 97 but only some wires are the same according to part numbers, but still might work okay. The wires on 88 could be shorter or longer..... i don't know.

If you need coils let me know. Wires will be attached so if they are the right lengths or not they will be included anyhow. $20 plus shipping.
Great! Hold on to the coils for me in case I need them. As long as the coils are the same, then that'll be just snappy. As for the wires, I'll will order new wires and end-caps and assemble that myself. Right now, the coil is on hold as I may have found the problem.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #34
You need to connect Hose#20 directly to the Fuel Filter #2, thereby by-passing Hose#17 and the auto shut-off valve#4.
It's easy... takes all of 1 minute, once you've removed the plastic radio housing.


I've learned that my fuel petcock is malfunctioning and this may have been the reason for my momentary engine slow down on Thanksgiving Day.

I decided to check the petcock today by disconnecting the vacuum line to the valve, and plugging the vacuum line. I then connected a vacuum pump to the petcock valve but did not apply vacuum. I started the bike and it just kept on running. Unless I'm in error, when vacuum pressure is applied to the valve, the diaphragms are pulled back to allow fuel to port through the valve and into the carbs. When the engine is shutdown, vacuum is lost and the diaphragms in the valve should close to prevent fuel travel. So it's not shutting off fuel flow, and might even be limiting fuel flow. Additionally, the failed valve might be the reason for the gas smell I get sometimes after shutdown; it is probably leaking somewhere that I do not see.

With regards to deleting the valve, wouldn't this be a bad thing? I would assume deleting the valve would allow fuel to be gravity-fed from the filter and into the carbs. Granted the float needles are supposed to prevent this when the needles are seated and thereby preventing further fuel from entering. But we all know that float needles are not a perfect mechanism, and I'd think it would be better to have a fuel shutoff control.

Looks very easy to do; just basically removing the main fuel line from the valve and connecting it directly to the filter. Have you done this already? Ever noticed any leaks or engine-flooding?

Joe
 

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I wouldn't recommend deleting the petcock, except perhaps for a test...

Petcock is rebuildable and parts still available... Or you could substitute with electric petcock valve, somebody posted a link to one, used in RV Aux Generator fuel systems...
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I wouldn't recommend deleting the petcock, except perhaps for a test...

Petcock is rebuildable and parts still available... Or you could substitute with electric petcock valve, somebody posted a link to one, used in RV Aux Generator fuel systems...
I like the electric petcock idea, but I'll stick with stock. I haven't pulled the valve off yet (might do that today). But the way it's acting, I suspect the metal seal bushing is likely stuck and unable to slide in or out. It passes the vacuum pull test without losing vacuum pressure. But the valve itself is not shutting off the fuel when vacuum pressure is released. And so I suspect it is also not allowing full fuel flow as well, but only enough to allow the engine to run. Naturally under high RPM loads, more fuel is pulled through the valve. But below 2,000 RPM, I think their might be a minor starvation issue. I read of another GL1500 owner who had the same symptoms as mine; jerks under 2,000 RPM and would often have a gassy smell after shutdown. Turns out it was his petcock. Even so, I still think I have a carb-float needle issue on the left carb since it appears to be the left intake manifold that sometimes gets flooded after shutdown. And I still want to remove the coils and wires to ohms test them, and inspect the coils for possible cracks. We are headed to D.C. in May for a Veterans rally so I want to make sure the bike is 100%.

Joe
 

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Naturally under high RPM loads, more fuel is pulled through the valve. But below 2,000 RPM, I think their might be a minor starvation issue.
Joe
Nothing "pulls" fuel through the valve, the pump pushes it. It would starve more at higher RPM if it wasn't getting enough flow.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Nothing "pulls" fuel through the valve, the pump pushes it. It would starve more at higher RPM if it wasn't getting enough flow.
I used a poor choice of words. I think (just a theory) that the valve is opened just enough to allow the engine to run. But under higher vacuum loads, the diaphragm might be opening up more above 2,000 RPM where it can then supply more fuel. But under lower RPM when the vacuum is lower (I've verified this using a vacuum gauge), the diaphragm isn't opening enough to allow sufficient fuel to service the engine at lower RPM's. At higher RPM's, the vacuum pull is stronger, which might be opening the valve more (if not all the way) to allow proper fuel at highway speeds.

Again, this is just my theory.

What I do know is that the vale is not closing. Remove the vacuum line and the valve should close, and starve the engine once the carbs are out of fuel. This did not happen. This still does not necessarily mean that my floats on the left carb are not bad. Even with a failed valve, with the floats working, the fuel should not be draining into the left intake manifold. So I'm going to remove the carbs and rebuild them; I already have the kit. Plus someone put a larger main-jet in when they had the bike. I have the stock jets.

I'll pull the valve off sometime today I think. The seals might be good, but the little bushing that holds the front and rear seal might be stuck from corrosion. Or the front seal might be bad. I feel that the rear larger seal is good because it held under vacuum when I tested it yesterday.

Joe
 
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