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Alright so I've been stripping down my 76 gl1000, and it the process have been trying to get an over all assessment of what it will take to get it back running to excellent condition.

There are many things I'm going to ask about but this post is related to the difference in condition of the two different exhaust headers. the headers that came of the left (starter) side were bone dry, but the one that came off of the right (fuel pump) side were glistening on the inside from a little oil.
Now it is my impression that there shouldn't be any oil in the exhaust headers as it should only be a release of fumes,

So my question is, is the little wetness of oil on the right headers indicate a possible problem with the engine, and if so what could it be. maybe one of the cylinder rings or seals? Or is this nothing at all?
Thanks, and will anxiously be awaiting the replies.
 

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Do a compression test on it, it might give some clue about the engine condition. A cold compression test won't tell everything but there still should not be a big difference between cylinders.
 

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well, I kind of can't do a compression test, the bike is completely striped. And my goal was to work on each part individually and then put it all back together.

What do you all recommend I check on the actual engine. While its sitting on the table, how far should I take it apart and what should I be looking for?
 

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The other posibility is that what you are seeing is partly burnt fuel from a carb problem. Much more likely.
 

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"Whiskerfish" as much as I hope that would be it, it hard for me to think that its that, because the bike has been sitting out for acouple years, and hasn't been even turned on I think in atleast 2 years. So wouldn't have fuel evaporated by now? The only thing I can think would stay that long would be oil.
 

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I know when carbs are flooding the residue often has more of the characteristics of oil than fuel. Either way it needs run. You can do a baseline Comp test to make sure nothing is horribly wrong but after sitting for 2 years it will need several hours or possibly days of exercise before you get valid readings. On a bike that has sat for a long time I have seen readings as low as 70 psi that would double after just a few hours of exercise.

When I get an unknown engine I do a baseline comp test,Change the Belts, throw on a spare set of carbs, and fire it up with a mix of 3 quarts of oil and 1 quart of MMO or similar. Run it for a while and redo the comp test and go from there. Sometimes while resolving other issues (brakes, tires, cosmetics etc etc.) I will run the bike a few minutes daily for several weeks before draining the case. When you do inspect what comes out through a cheeze cloth if possible. Replace with cheap oil and run a hundred miles and do another oil change. Then check your Comp again.
 
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