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2001 Goldwing suspension. Seems that the suspension is getting harder and harder. Bumps and just regular highway seems like it has no shock resistance. Any ideas. I have had it for a year and a half and it seems to get worse. I have a manual but it really doesn't help to figure out what is the problem or I cannot understand. Like some help before I take to a Honda dealer to spend a lot of money.
 

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I think you are just experiencing normal tire wear. When tires are new they cushion the ride a bit , as they wear and as they age, the ride does become more harsh. Especially with the radial tires. I call them cement radials. You might service the anti-dive valve on the front forks also. It may be stuck or sticking, if so it will ride quite rough.

Kit
 

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Do I need to take it in to Honda to service the anti-dive valve or can I do it myself?
 

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:)Without a Shadow of doubt,,,Anti-Dive Valve,,ive had loads of trouble with the darn thing, exact same symptoms,,,took it to the main Goldwing dealers to put right,,at a cost of £90,, well worth the money,,
 

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Kit hit on one of the few things that needs to be serviced. Sometimes with age the anti-dive valve sticks and the front end feels like you have no springs. If you're good at bleeding brakes and such you can get out your manual and service the valve yourself. Another option is some riders disable the valve because they dont feel it makes much of a difference. I know quite a few trikers that have done it also. They take apart the valve and put a shim made out of a nickle with a hole in the center to keep the valve from actuating fully. Sometimes you get lucky and all you need to do is take the valve apart clean it and regrease it and you're good to go. Also double check your tire pressures, and your suspension presets for the back shock. But I am betting on the anti-dive valve.
 

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REBroker wrote:
Do I need to take it in to Honda to service the anti-dive valve or can I do it myself?
You can do it yourself if you have the tools and all that, if not it will be less hassle to just take it to the dealer. I would have them install a new one, and not even try to put new seals in the old one.

They will have to support the front end off the ground, unbolt the thing, naturally you lose the left fork oil, and a bit of brake fluid, although you do not loose all the fork oil it does need to be drained and the fork cleaned out, all that kind of thing, so you will end up with a lot of work to replace the thing. Front wheel , fender, left fork all that will come off, if they do it properly.

But with a manual you can do it too. But is a lot of work for such a tiny little gadget. Specifically because the fork needs to be cleaned and fresh oil installed.

However before I did all this, I would for sure have one of them ride the bike and see if they think that is the problem. It is very hard to internet trouble shoot and I do not wish to cause you expense and not solve the problem. So have someone who is familiar with this check it out. It may just be the tires .

Kit
 

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The anti dive-valve is the likely problem. If it is not repaired the left fork seal can and will blow out on the next bump you hit. Now that is a real hugemess!:p
You can loosen or back off the two allen head screws that hold the halfs of the anti-dive valve together. Back them off about the thickness of a nickle. No fluids will leak out. This is a emergency tweek at best andONLY to get the bike to a service shop to replace the anti-dive valve. I think the valve costs less than $40. Not worth rebuilding at that price. If you have a Honda service manual you can do the job yourself. :weightlifter:


KIT is right.... you will lose brake and fork fluid when the valve is "removed". Many of us replace the fork bushings, fork oil and perhaps springs, when we do this job. Disabling the anti-dive valve is something usually done ONLY when the fork springs are upgraded. The greatest advantage of doing this is eliminating the possibility of blowing that left fork seal in the middle of nowhere on a long trip, just because the anti-dive valve locked up.:shock::shock::shock:
 

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Kit Carson wrote:
REBroker
They will have to support the front end off the ground, unbolt the thing, naturally you lose the left fork oil, and a bit of brake fluid, although you do not loose all the fork oil it does need to be drained and the fork cleaned out, all that kind of thing, so you will end up with a lot of work to replace the thing.  Front wheel , fender, left fork all that will come off, if they do it properly.


Kit


The part that usually requires servicing is the top section which does not loose any fork oil but will need a bleed of the brakes
 

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I am a little confused by the last replies on this one guys as I clean and check my anti-dive valve piston at every service and it is very easy with no loss of fork oil. I simply remove both allen bolts completely holdingthe top cover of the anti-valveand removethetop coverinto my hand. You don't detatchthe anti-dive valvefrom thefork leg as this is a big job and will lose fluid, you just remove the top of it with the two little allen boltsand you will clearly see the little piston that activates the anti-dive.

It is a very simple fix. If it is in the out position it is very likely stuck in this position and the cause of the problem with the anti-dive permanently in operation.You simply apply oil or a little grease to the little black piston and manually push it in with your thumb.Then by applying the rear brake with my other hand the piston should moveout. If you have someone with you who can apply the front brake this will do the same job. Do this a few times whilst applying oil or a little greaseto the piston and it will work fine. What you should end up with is a piston that will push in easily with your thumb and pop out again when the brake is applied.

To test it whenput back on the bike you ride the bike in 1st gear a few feet and brake hard with the front brake.The front end should drop but you should be able to move the front suspension up and down at this point with the brake still applied. Then quickly release and then reapply the front brake without moving and the front suspension should become very stiff and hard to move, indicating that the anti-dive is working.

I took this advice from the Fred Harmon videos and it was also discussed on this Forum and the GB Forum in the past. Perhaps one of the Guru's can clarify this one but I have never had any fluid loss when removing the top of the Anti-dive valve and it is a very simple DIY repair if done regularly. Remember I am not removing the actual anti-dive, just the top of it where the piston is located. It has worked for me and my Anti-Dive valve is still working fine after 25,000 miles. I wouldn't pay a garage to do a job that I can do myself in 10 mins and I am no mechanic.

Again perhaps one of the Guru's can clarify if my way of doing it is correct as I would hate to give out incorrect advice.
 

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Littlejohn wrote:
I am a little confused by the last replies on this on guys as I clean and check my anti-dive valve piston at every service and it is very easy with no loss of fork oil. I simply remove both allen bolts completely holdingthe top cover of the anti-valveand removethetop coverinto my hand. You don't detatchthe anti-dive valvefrom the fork leg as this is a big job and will lose fluid, you just remove the top of it with the two little allen boltsand you will clearly see the little piston that activates the anti-dive.

It is a very simple fix. If it is in the out position it is very likely stuck in this position and the cause of the problem with the anti-dive permanently in operation.You simply apply oil or a little grease to the little black piston and manually push it in with your thumb.Then by applying the rear brake with my other hand the piston should moveout. If you have someone with you who can apply the front brake this will do the same job. Do this a few times whilst applying oil or a little greaseto the piston and it will work fine. What you should end up with is a piston that will push in easily with your thumb and pop out again when the brake is applied.

To test it whenput back on the bike you ride the bike in 1st gear a few feet and brake hard with the front brake.The front end should drop but you should be able to move the front suspension up and down at this point with the brake still applied. Then quickly release and then reapply the front brake without moving and the front suspension should become very stiff and hard to move, indicating that the anti-dive is working.

I took this advice from the Fed Harmon videos and it was also discussed on this Forum and the GB Forum in the past. Perhaps one of the Guru's can clarify this one but I have never had any fluid loss when removing the top of the Anti-dive valve and it is a very simple DIY repair if done regularly. Remember I am not removing the actual anti-dive, just the top of it where the piston is located. I has worked for me and my Anti-Dive valve is still working fine after 25,000 miles. I wouldn't pay a garage to do a job that I can do myself in 10 mins and I am no mechanic.

Again perhaps one of the Guru's can clarify if my way of doing it is correct as I would hate to give out incorrect advice. i did not know it was so easy,,,, ill save this for future reference,, many thanks:cheeky1:
 

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globetrotter wrote:
Kit Carson wrote:
REBroker
They will have to support the front end off the ground, unbolt the thing, naturally you lose the left fork oil, and a bit of brake fluid, although you do not loose all the fork oil it does need to be drained and the fork cleaned out, all that kind of thing, so you will end up with a lot of work to replace the thing. Front wheel , fender, left fork all that will come off, if they do it properly.


Kit


The part that usually requires servicing is the top section which does not loose any fork oil but will need a bleed of the brake
That is normally what happens, someone has trouble with the thing and they run off to the shop and the guys just pull the top part and put on an O'ring and shove it back in there and two weeks later it is acting up again. When the bikes first came out there was a lot of trouble with this, as one composition of O'ring was used that sits in both the brake fluid and the fork oil. As time went on the O'rings were changed so they would not deteriorate, and it is always best to simply install a new unit on the older bikes and get rid of the dirty fork oil, the gunk, you would be amazed at how dirty the fork oil can be, one would not think so, but it is.
So what good does it do to half A$$ do something? EH, that is what shops do, hopefully we can do better. This lazy attitude is why my bike never sees a shop. I just about bet when a shop does this job they do put in new fork oil but I just bet they do not clean the lower fork tube.

So do what you will, pull the top, fix it as you will, put nickles in the thing and then when you need emergency braking it will not be there. Do as you will, I for one will fix things properly .



Respectfully
Kit
 

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Kit sorry I wasn't trying to be critical of your posting as you probably have much greater knowledge of the bike than I have. I was just relating what I do to maintain a free moving anti-dive valve piston and how I cure my valve if it sticks slightly. Obviously as you say, if there is a bigger problem with the valve and the piston won't budge, then it is a much bigger job better done by a mechanic. What I describe is a simple DIY fix that may or may not resolve the problem of a sticking unlubricated piston.
 

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Littlejohn wrote:
Kit sorry I wasn't trying to be critical of your posting as you probably have much greater knowledge of the bike than I have. I was just relating what I do to maintain a free moving anti-dive valve piston and how I cure my valve if it sticks slightly. Obviously as you say, if there is a bigger problem with the valve and the piston won't budge, then it is a much bigger job better done by a mechanic. What I describe is a simple DIY fix that may or may not resolve the problem of a sticking unlubricated piston.
:waving:Hi Little John: It is all a mute point in any event, none of us have even seen the bike, what is the exact problem, no one knows. Internet stuff is not like standing out in the shop and saying ok it might be this and having a discussion about it.

It is cool!!;) I do like to argue sometimes, but would much prefer to have that argument in person with a smile. :D Kit
 

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Thanks for the good information. I really think it is the anti-dive valve after hearing all of the information here. I am not mechanic enough for that kind of fix and will take it in for sure.
Thanks, REBroker
 
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