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Hello All
Just installed a marine grade 12V DC accessory socket In the lower fairng to power a 12v tire inflator and wired it to the accessory fuse. Question is it blew the 5 amp fuse,the inflator has a 15 amp built in fuse,so i but a 15amp fuse in place of the stock 5 amp. it all is working fine, but is increasing to the 15 amp fuse going to cause a problem ?

It is only going to be used to top of my tire pressures instead of breaking out my big compressor.

Thanks Jim
 

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Still Learning
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You are trying to power a 15 amp unit off a 5 amp circuit. It won't work that way.

You need a relay to put power from the battery when the ignition switch is turned on, switched off the 5 amp fuse.
 

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Do a search on auxiliary power circuits
 

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It aint rocket science
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Jim

For anything drawing more current than a GPS or cell phone charger I would not use that circuit. If you have a battery tender plug connected to the battery that would be ideal to use for the compressor.

JD
 

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You ar risking the entire bike burning up when the stock wiring melts instead of the 5amp fuse blowing.

Instead install a relay, fused from the battery, and then to the accessory, then grounded to the frame/returned to the battery. You then run a second wire from the stock 5amp. fuse to trigger this relay so that it still turns on and off with the key.
 

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15 amp draw on a 5 amp circuit is asking for melted wires and a fire.
Bobby
 

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Ok All Guess i will wire directly to the battery for now and worry about a switched source later. It is a waterproof socket so i don't think i have much to worry about being hot all the time.

Jim
 

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rideandslidejim wrote:
Ok All Guess i will wire directly to the battery for now and worry about a switched source later. It is a waterproof socket so i don't think i have much to worry about being hot all the time.

Jim
It should still have a fuse and fuse holder between the socket and the battery, not direct.
 

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Just asking because I don't know, I don't believemy SEI has an accessory fuse on the actual fuse block...
Does the accessory fuse terminal have smaller wire coming off of it? Or is it sized at 5 amp to prevent overload of the primary dogbone as a calculation of total load. I guess my point is that fuses protect the wiring size. If 18 Guage wire can carry 16 amps in chassis wiring and any associated wire in that accessory circuit is 18Ga. or larger then why wouldn't he be able to use that fuse position.
Again I understand the point that you never oversize a fuse for a specific wire size, but the main question I have is, is that fuse size arbitrary or does it have a very skinny wire coming off of it or feeding it for that matter.
Personally I use a relay for my accessories which is accessible under my shelter and allows me to add additional accessories if wanted.
Additionally Jim a 5 amp fuse may blow but you could try a 7.5 amp or even a 10. But only if no wiring in the circuit is smaller than 18Ga. Seems the limited use of this socket for the tire inflator would'nt affect things that much but again that depends on the construction of that circuit.
If it were me I'd leave the one in the pocket where it is still fused at 5 amps(for a gps or phone charger etc)and add one at the battery with an inline fuse or just purchase the type of inflator with alligator clips...



Sorry, I thought I read it was in the fairing pocket. You posted in lower fairing...
 

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Monkey with a Football
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In an electrical circuit, the weakest link in the loop will always be the place where the the part breaks down. The fuse is always the intended weakest point in the chain.
When you boost past what it is rated for, you are changing that relationship. It may or may not remain the weakest link in the chain. If it isn't. then something else is. Typically things other than fuses aren't designed to safely handle this load because they were never intended to be the weakest link. Hence fire hazard and damage to harnesses are the common result. Neither of which are desirable.
 

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Rudy wrote:
In an electrical circuit, the weakest link in the loop will always be the place where the the part breaks down. The fuse is always the intended weakest point in the chain.
When you boost past what it is rated for, you are changing that relationship. It may or may not remain the weakest link in the chain. If it isn't. then something else is. Typically things other than fuses aren't designed to safely handle this load because they were never intended to be the weakest link. Hence fire hazard and damage to harnesses are the common result. Neither of which are desirable.
Rudy,

As an electrician and former aircraft avionics tech I understand exactly the role a fuse plays in a circuit. However you haven't really answered the question I asked. The fuse socket and any wiring attached to it is really the deciding factor. The fuse socket may be rated for 30 amps or higher but the manufacturer may have set it up for a 5 amp draw so as not to overload the entire system or main dogbone. As long as any feed wire going into or out of that socket is rated for greater than the amperage rating of the fuse-in this case 15 ampthen no danger exists.

The question I asked was whether anyone really knew the size of the wire feeding this fuse, how it subdivides etc. Myassumption was that the input of this fuse comes from the same wire off the battery that feeds the rest of the fuses in that block. Assuming further that any outgoing wire off this fuse was at least rated for 15 amps then again, no danger of overheat and or fire exists.

Added amperage capacity at the accessory terminal would thus result in increased amperage across the main fuse but the main danger there would be causing the main fuse to melt.

Again I ask the question because I don't own a bike that has this or know how that fuse block is constructed or how an outgoing wire is tapped into an accessory circuit. ie whether from a pigtail off the fuse block, screw terminal etc? Have you physically seen that connections smaller than 15 amp rated exist or are you just making the assumption because a 5 amp fuse comes in this bike from the factory?
 

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most here won't know that info unless it was torn into by them. Chances are you won't get that info you seek here. Why chance it! Add a circuit and save yourself or someone else a loss in property or life.
 

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newday777 wrote:
most here won't know that info unless it was torn into by them. Chances are you won't get that info you seek here. Why chance it! Add a circuit and save yourself or someone else a loss in property or life.
That's exactly the point I was trying to make. If someone HAS torn into and seen what's on the backside of those acessory screw terminals then they can correctly answer the question. If you havent, then you, like me, don't really know.I would never suggest anyone take chances or risk fire. Nor am I suggesting leaving anything to chance. This forum is a place to learn and I believe someone, somewherehas likelyinvestigated this.I was plainly trying to answer a question by finding out all the facts.

Simply blurting out that you can't do something or that it's dangerous without the knowledge to prove why is just being an alarmist IMHO.

Wouldn't it be nice for members to know if, in a pinch, they could use those accessory terminals for running a fuel pump or headlight if broken down or if the OEM wiring is damaged. Especially if all they needed to get going was some wire and borrow a fuse from another location.

Not going to post any more on this thread as it now a hijack but I would be interested to know nonetheless. Next time I come across a Goldwing in a junkyard I may just have a look and answer the question myself.

Happy New Year anyway!

:smiler:
 

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Just food for thought.
The 85-87 Interstates all used the same fuse box, the 85 had a 10amp accessory fuse, the 86-87 had a 5amp accessory fuse.
I don't know if Honda found a problem with or changed the wiring and/or ignition switch resulting in the fuse change.
I would consider using a 15amp fuse in an emergency to power something critical but as newday777 said the correct way is to use a relay activated off the accessory terminal for anything that requires more than the stock fuse can handle or as rideandslidejim has said power it direct from the battery, fused of course.
 

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Forgot to mention, i do have a in line fuse in the line.

wingsam41 I understand what you are saying and somewhat thought that when switching the fuse, especialy since the accessory contacts are 2 screws at the top of the fuse block.I really can't see there being a different gauge wire to each fuse port. But i guess we won't know until someone tears a 1200 fuse block apart.
Although it got off the thread i enjoy the open minded discussions and thinking this forum brings forth and we all learn from, weather positive or negative. Get it coming !!!!

Jim
 

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rideandslidejim wrote:
Forgot to mention, i do have a in line fuse in the line.

wingsam41 I understand what you are saying and somewhat thought that when switching the fuse, especialy since the accessory contacts are 2 screws at the top of the fuse block.I really can't see there being a different gauge wire to each fuse port. But i guess we won't know until someone tears a 1200 fuse block apart.
Although it got off the thread i enjoy the open minded discussions and thinking this forum brings forth and we all learn from, weather positive or negative. Get it coming !!!!

Jim
Thanks for this response Jim. I was beginning to think my point wasn't getting across-simply that a branch circuits rating is determined by the size of it's wire and ratings of components on that circuit. I would bet that it is sized at 5 amp in an attempt to prevent overload of the main fuse.

I run exactly 2 accessories on my SEi-heated grips and a heated vest. The 86 SEI has no such accessory fuse. Nor does the 85 LTD or latter year Aspencades.

These accessories I havederive power direct off the battery-something I am not particularly fond of. Stacking ring terminals under the battery terminals has likely resulted in just as many meltdowns if not more than wiring something fromthe accessory terminal.

I allow myself exactly ONE ringconnector at each battery terminal. Since I have 2 devices I have formed a Y going into to each battery terminal. Each component came with a harness containing an inline fuse. It's important to note that the size of the "Y"s base (the part going to the battery) has to increase in size to accomodate the 2 branches coming off of it.For anyfuture accessories, I will add a distribution or aux. fuse block.

The other problem I have is that people freely advise going off the battery without first learning what other accessories you are running. Running off the accessory terminal means you are deriving power through the 30 amp main fuse. Running off the battery you aren't.The reason that is a 30 amp fuse is by design. Not only because it protects the wire going to the ignition/fuse panelbut also to limit electric load added because your bike is limited in the amount of power it can produce and therefore the number of accessories you can add. Coming direct off the battery bypasses this "built in" limit and people can easily exceed their bikes charging limitations in this fashion.

My Grips run through a relay and a fuse while my vest does not. The relay offers no additional safety-just the peace of knowing that it powers off the grips when I am not on the bike preventing a dead battery. When I get off the bike so does the vest so not necessary to run through a relay.

Ken, you mention (considering) allowing the use of this accesory terminal in an emergency but not under normal circumstances. How is that any different or less dangerous? If Jim is 50 miles from home and wires his fuel pump direct to these screws will the bike discern that it is an emergency and therefore not allow wiring to burn up? Of course not. Would be nice to know just how beefy this circuit actually is for that reason alone.

Again, I stand by what I said and was just trying to illustrate a point and answer a question at the same time.
 
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