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I am quickly coming up on my 600 mile oil change. I do my own maintenance and plan on changing both the crankcase and final drive oil. I have three questions:

Is it too early to go with synthetic?

I have used Shell Rotella Synthetic 5w-40 for all of my previous motorcycles and it has worked great. What is the general consensus on the best oil for the money?

I have read that the Honda oil filter is the best to use. I have also read that Purolator Pure One oil filters are one of the best on the market and I have been using them for 3 years. How does the Honda filter compare?

Thanks for any advice or input!
 

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Does Honda require they do the first service for warranty compliance?. I would bet the Honda filter would do the job without any issues. As far as oil goes, any oil that meets Honda's spec for your bike would also be fine.Your owners manual should give you the oil requirements.,,
 

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While its under warranty, get the dealers thumbs up because they are the ones that will look for escape routes if you bring in a wing under warranty for repairs. I dont think it's too early if you want to go synthetic.
 

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The first oil change is at 4000 miles, I'll leave it up to you on the brand.
 

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Yep the first oil change is at 4000 miles.
 

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Imnotlost wrote:
I am quickly coming up on my 600 mile oil change. I do my own maintenance and plan on changing both the crankcase and final drive oil. I have three questions:

Is it too early to go with synthetic?

I have used Shell Rotella Synthetic 5w-40 for all of my previous motorcycles and it has worked great. What is the general consensus on the best oil for the money?

I have read that the Honda oil filter is the best to use. I have also read that Purolator Pure One oil filters are one of the best on the market and I have been using them for 3 years. How does the Honda filter compare?

Thanks for any advice or input!

Imnotlost, Lostinflorida has to be smiling this morning. He's a great guy you need to hook up some time.



Anyway, regarding the oil change this is what I did on my 07 1800 and all the other bikes. The Shell 5W-40 really works for me in the bike, cars and boat. The filter I use is the #PL14610 PureOne. This filter is slightly oversize but fits without removing the lower cowle. I clipped off a section of the horn flare to do this. Also the cable that operates the foot warmer, just push it out of the way. This setup has been the norm since the bike had 250 miles or so on it. Wanted to get the trash out of the transmission etc.



Some may disagree with the above, but this bike has 20,000 miles now with no complaints.



The Shell 5W-40 comes in a 4 qt. container. Put the whole amount in and the oversize filter will swallow the slight over amount of oil.



Some members do not like this oil as they think the first gear upshift to second is loader. I usually shift first gear near 3000 rpm. Seams to be a little smoother and quieter.



You won't go wrong with other oils or filter either. The important thing is to change the oil and filter sticking with the right viscosity. I usually change my units at 4000 miles unless it's a long trip, which is better on oil than stop and go.



Hope the above helps and welcome to the best of the best goldwing site.



Longboater,
 

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foot warmer...
I think my cable operates the back scratchier
 

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I'm thinking like some of the others here that if this is a new 1800, and it is what the dealer recommended to change the oil at 600 miles, then let the dealer change it...As mentioned if for any reason you do have a problem until it runs out of the warranty, then you will have no problems, well that is up for debate too, in it getting the dealer or Honda to do the repairs under the warranty.... They won't warranty any work if you change it yourself...I know this from my Suzuki I bought...I had the dealer do the first and all the oil changes until it went out of warranty...Good thing too, because I had some minor valve problems that had I been doing my own oil changes, it would have cost me several hundreds of dollars....My warranty covered those repairs 100%...

My dealer had several brands of oil that they used according to the customers requests be used in their bikes....But every brand they used was authorized by Suzuki as being a "under warranty oil"....You might ask your dealer if they handle that brand you want to use and if not why??? My money is on letting them do all the warranty oil changes, then when the warranty runs out use what you want..Why risk your warranty????

Claude.....
 

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I verified with my dealership that doing my own services would not void the warranty. I keep all receipts and document anything done to my bikes and have never had a problem.

As for the 600 mile service, I know it's not a documented oil change. On my Kawasakis, it was recommended that the oil be changed at 600 miles so that the metal shavings/etc would be removed from the system instead of remaining until the first actual scheduled service. I performed both of those initial 600 mile services and observed metal shavings.

I may be mistaken about the need for a 600 mile oil change on the Goldwing, (this is my first). However, I certainly see no harm in changing the main engine and final drive oil just to be able to see what kind of shavings are present. After all, it would be a peace of mind thing just knowing that any shavings weren't in the system for 4,000 miles.

I bought a Honda oil filter today while I was at the dealership. I'll be ordering the OEM shop manual online as well. I'll most likely go with the Shell Rotella 5w-40 synthetic since it has served me well in everything motorized that I own and is still available for about $20 a gallon. However, the jury is still out while I collect more input from you helpful forum members. :)

Thanks for all of your input thus far.
 

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Hopefully your final drive is full to the mark. I checked mine at 250 miles and found it almost dry. While you are at it check all fluids. This will also allow you to familiarise your self with your new 1800. Tire air pressure is very important. I check mine every Sunday. Just before a long trip everything is double checked the day before. This eliminates any doubt about the machinery. I do not have to think about it. This allows me to concentrate on other issues, like road conditions and such.



Longboater,
 

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Honda engines are typically "broken in" by about 300 to 350 miles. The 600-mile oil change is a not-later-than oil change. I changed my oil at 300 and 600 miles. This may seem like overkill, but look at all the nice "sparklies" in your oil at 300 miles. The hypoid is even worse. You can see large metal particles by flushing. Yes, you want the metal to metal "breakin" but do you want the metal shavings, from the first 300 miles, floating around your engine and hypoid for another 300 miles?

I consider Shell Rotella T (rated CJ-4/SM) the best synthetic oil on the market. I use Mobil-1 Synthetic gear oil for the hypoid. Keep flushing the hypoid about every 250 miles, until you see no particles.

The Honda oil filter is a cheap, OEM, filter that I would not use on my lawn mower. Save it, when you change the oil the first time, and compare it's construction to a quality filter (you'll never use a Honda filter again). The Purolator and K&N oil filters are the best made. The K&N costs twice as much, but all you gain is a "nut shape" on the end of the filter to help with removal.

Don't document the 300-mile oil change. Get receipts for the 600-mile change and document that one. The best thing, if you do your own maintenance, is to get the Service Manual and cite the paragraph and page that details the service that you performed.
 

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All good info guys, thanks again for the helpful advice. From the articles I had read, I pretty much came to the same conclusion as Ncman. Mobil1 synthetic is rated superior as well, but they are too proud of their stuff. I do have the Mobil synthetic gear oil, however. To me, using the best filter is equally important. However, the articles I had read had not mentioned anything about the Honda filter. I just presumed (possibly incorrectly) that it was the best for the Goldwing because of what the owner's manual stated...as well as the parts department (go figure). Is the Honda filter a paper-type?
 

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The Honda filter is a paper filter, and you won't find a better filter to protect your engine.

the other options are coarser and allow more dust through.

Some have K&N filters, but I won't use them myself.
 

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Well there are a lot of opinions about oils, and a lot about oil filters. Thing is the filter is actually the important one to consider, it cleans whatever oil you might decide to use .

It is beyond me why anyone would wish to not use the OEM filter. It is a very good filter and does a great job. The outside case is tough, remember , unless you install one of those flimsy belly pans,the filter is exposed to the road hazards. Cheaper filters have been known to gain a puncture. You can smack an OEM one with a hammer or screwdriver and it will just dent. Those wally world ones made by champion I can crush with my bare hand..........so????

As for cost, hey order them bulk, five at a time, from one of the aftermarket places, they sell real OEM filters for around 5 dollars each. Chromeworld is one such place.
 

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The genuine Honda OEM oil filter is made by Toyo Roki, has 94 sq in of surface area, a 20 mil case a nitrile drainback valve and is a paper-only filter.

The Purolator Pure One equivalent has 110 sq in of surface area, a 20 mil case, a silicone drainback valve and has a mixture of paper and synthetic media.

The drainback valve on a horizontally mounted filter is extremely important. Nitrile has an operating range of -22F to 212F. Silicone has an operating range of -78F to 392F. Nitrile is the most commonly used material, but does not have the higher qualities of silicone. If the anti-drainback valve fails, all the micron-sized particles, that the filter has trapped, will drain back into the crankcase.

If you are going to buy the OEM filter, buy it from your dealer and make sure it is made by Toyo Roki. Unfortunately, in the U.S. and Canada, Honda has allowed Fram (Honeywell) to manufacture oil filters carrying the Honda name. These filters are inferior to the Toyo Roki. They are usually sold through online suppliers of Honda OEM parts and are packaged in bulk.

The Honda OEM filter, made by Toyo Roki is a good filter. The Purolator Pure One equivalent is a much better filter. A paper filter passes 25 times as much 30-micron particles as the Pure One. Purolator is one of the few manufacturers of filters. Most filters are "repackaged" . If the filter brand is not AMSoil, Champion, Emgo, Fram, Denso, Hastings, Hi Flo, K&N, Perf Form, Purolator, Toyo Roki, Veshra or Wix, it was made by one of these companies.
 

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Well this is a very interesting thread to me as I am closing in on 600 miles with my new one. Everybody has their own opinions on oil and filters, I am not going to get into that. The manual says the 1st maintenance is 4000 miles but I was told by the dealer to do a 600 mile service, and they quoted $175 for that, I think I would be crazy to pay that for a glorified oil change, the only thing they told me they do is check some bolts for torque, I read in the manual one can do his own oil changes as long as its documented, so I am going to do my own. I have never had warranty issues with other bikes that I did my own oil changes. I can't see why this would void the warranty if the manual tells you how to do your own oil change and document it?
 

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Oil changes can never hurt your bike. they can cost a person extra money if that person chooses to do them before the book sais their due. My cars & trucks get them every 3 months, I dont look at the mileage. My bike gets 3 or 4 per year but I look at the color of the oil or what I have put my bike through in the last few months.

As long as your warranty requirements are met, additional oil changes become owner discretion. A clean motor is a happy motor!:waving:
 

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Sorting it all out:

Oil is oil is oil is oil and with regular oil changes which oil you use is really not a concern. I have my favorite as many other riders also have.

An oil filter is an oil filter is an oil filter, as long as it is changed at regular intervals. I also have my favorite in this, as many do.


On the 1800 the change interval is 4000 miles for the first one and at every 8000 miles thereafter. So your second oil change would be at 12,000 miles.

If it gives you peace of mind to change oil sooner, do so. I do usually at 5000 miles.

On my first oil change on my new 1800 at 3800 miles the oil was fine and there were no metal filings present in the rear drive, just a tiny bit of sludge and I mean a tiny bit on the small magnet set in the drain plug. (rear drive )

Changing your own oil and doing your own service will not void any warranty. Dealers simply like to see the bikes back, as that is how they make their money after the sale.

So far our two local dealers have not pulled this 600 mile oil change I hear about on some degree, however in our area there are a whole lot of very knowledgeable and experienced riders, so it is difficult for them to hand out too many mushrooms. They and we are very active in the community with rides, things for the kids and many other things, so truth prevails. We have a large number of Wings in South Carolina.

Kit
 
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