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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have 76 gl1000 with dyna coils and points

was running ok i thought but few days ago started to missfire, a lot
i thougt it was point gap ot timming
reset gap
cleaned points with sand paper, and even sprayed with electrical contact cleaner, as well as put paper between points to drag out any stuff from sanding.
got it to run set timming with strobe light.

3&4 seems to run steady no arcing at points, steady flasho on strobe

1&2 points arching continously it appears irratic flashingon strob

does this mean my coil 1&2 is shot or am i looking in the wrong place?

can i put the dodge neon coils in this bike safely from a thread i saw on this site?????

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/2-goldwing-technical-forum/356137-coil-alternative-gl1100s-probably-1200s-too.html
feeling a little over my head
David
 

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Hello David and Welcome to the forum . If you post yourquestion in the Technical Forum it will have much more exposure and likely to get you more replies .
Let me also take a moment to invite you to NASSIR VI in Simcoe . INFO in this link :NASSIR 6 Eh! - Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums

I hope your able to find help and solve your problem . ITs summer and thats ridin time .
 

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Arcing points is a sign of a bad condenser, replace it.
I agree. Misfiring and burning points is almost guaranteed to be from a bad condenser. If you are getting a large blue spark when flicking the points, that will confirm a bad condenser.
 

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Welcome:waving:nusink
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
pulled condenser from my 78 gl1000 put it int the 76 and presto
been riding all day

thankyou thank you thank you
to all who helped
David
 

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Welcome from Oklahoma :waving: Enjoy the wing :cheesygrin:
 

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Welcome, Welcome from Clermont, Indiana
You want to post this in the Goldwing Technical forum all the real GURU's hang out there and they can help you
 

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Also, sanding your points down with sandpaper is one of the cardinal sins against ignition points. They do make burnishing tools for cleaning points, but those are tough to find at times.

http://www.cycleworld.com/2013/02/15/points-and-burnishing-files-tool-time/
Back years ago, when I used to smoke, and rode bikes with points, I would use the strip on a book of matches to clean points. I don't see anything wrong with using really fine sandpaper on them, but only pull it through once, then flip it over and pull it through again. Besides a bad condenser, one of the big causes of points failure was poor contact between the 2 sides. I have seen points sanded or filed so much that only one tiny spot was actually making contact. I had to "dress" the points on my '66 Triumph Bonneville every thousand miles of so.
 

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use a dwell meter!!

if you're not already, try using an old timey automotive dwell meter to set the points (while idling), instead of feeler gauges. It's the only way to get the points absolutley, perfectly synched with each other...
you'll never find a spec listed anywhere, even in the owner's manual,
but 45 degrees dwell seems to be the magic number..
(22.5 on an 8 cylinder scale meter)
also..a "crisp" dollar bill, folded just right & sprayed with contact cleaner, makes a good point cleaning tool..
good luck,
Carsh
:)
 

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Back years ago, when I used to smoke, and rode bikes with points, I would use the strip on a book of matches to clean points. I don't see anything wrong with using really fine sandpaper on them, but only pull it through once, then flip it over and pull it through again. Besides a bad condenser, one of the big causes of points failure was poor contact between the 2 sides. I have seen points sanded or filed so much that only one tiny spot was actually making contact. I had to "dress" the points on my '66 Triumph Bonneville every thousand miles of so.

I also was taught the matchbook trick by my GM Mechanic Dad, carried some in the glove box of every vehicle we had! BTW, the paper matchbook is also just the right thickness for the initial gap setting too! Fine tuning the gap, though is meter territory. But if you need to get rolling on a dark and stormy night a matchbook can be a lifesaver. Thanks for jogging that memory!
 

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Very same simptoms of my '76 CB750. I had new points, plugs, coils but the bike sputtered and one set of points sparked and burned quick. Put the old condnser on that side and took care of the problem.
 
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