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I have to remove the carburetors i guess.

How hard is it to remove them? I am getting frusterated trying to find a Cure for this popping out the tail end, and idle issues.

pop out the carb = ignition,

Pop out the tail = Fuel delivery.

I just put Seafoam in the tank and have been running it (not riding) but cannot find the popping remedy.

I have to clean out the Bowls and make sure the floats are free, also blow the jets.
 

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Yes, they need rebuilding, there are fuel stains on the engine and carb shafts. Carb work is not *hard* but its intricate. Remove the air box and filter, lines and linkages, then unbolt the manifolds from the heads andslide the assemblies out. Avoid taking the carb bodies off the assembly, that can cause major headaches (unless the fuel pipes are leaking, then need to change O rings). The critical parts are cleanliness, correct fuel levels (once new floats and float needles are fitted) and synchronisation. Being that age, id be surprised if the rubber parts are any good.

Popping out carb or exhaust can be many things, ignition or fuel, or both. These motorcycles are more famous for electrical problems (weak ignition) than fuel system problems. IF the fuel goes either rich or lean, or spark goes weak, they can backfire badly without timing problems. Or a leaking valve?


Dont recall whether it was the GL1000 or 1100 carbs I'd rebuilt years ago, but they had small air bleeds in the side of the castings that were fun to change.
 

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ran429, remove the carbs as one complete unit, don't take them out one at a time, it's much easier this way. Remove the air filter and box, remove the fuel line, remove the throttle and enrichener cables and loosen the rubber joints at the manifold elbows, then remove the fasteners that hold the elbows to the cylinder heads, then lift the carb assembly and slide it out as a unit.

Make sure you locate the idle and intermediate fuel jets underneath the metal pucks and change the o rings on these jets because they are normally hardened and cracked after so many years. Be prepared to buy some new jets because the idle and intermediate jets are so tiny that you may not be able to get air to flow through them if there is serious corrosion. Do not pass a wire through the jets to clean them as you will open them up and you'll never get them set right afterwards. You may also need to purchase needle valves and seats and you will need new o rings for the elbows. Don't be shocked by the price of these parts, they're not cheap.

Make sure you have a good manual for the float adjustment specs and rebuild proceduresand take your time rebuilding them. .

Also, be extremely careful with the float pins, they only go in and out in one direction. If you force them out the wrong way you stand a very good chance of breaking the float pin tabs and then the carb pretty much becomes junk.

Good luck.

Vic
 

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The GL1000 carbs tend to be furred up inside and jets can be hard to remove. It won't do any harm to soak the bodies in WD40 after you remove the floats. Check the spindles were they go through the bodies for free play as this can cause popping as well.
 
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