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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! Well the good news is after setting for 15 years the old bird cranks over!!! Now here are my questions. I am a car guy not a bike guy but I have done restoration work on my Cadillacs and that is like second nature to me. With the bike it's where do I start. These are the things I know will need done. Rust in the tank needs cleaned out, Carbs cleaned, change timing belts,change fluids, adjust valves? bike has 50K on it, rebuild brakes. Did I miss anything? And if any of you have taken on a project like this in what order should I start. And I have ordered a shop manual that I will be picking up this week. As for cosmetic things I can handle that after being a painter for 30 years...buff it, wax it, touch it up, look good as new! Thanks ahead of time for any suggestions. John
 

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78 gl1000

Welcome to the forum sounds like your headed in the right direction and in the right order in my opinion (but we all know about opinions), however order is up to you.
 

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Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
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On that rusty tank, I would use the electrolysis method.

It will be ***** and span when it is done with a minimum of muss.
 

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Not sure if it's against the rules but I suggest you wonder over to the naked goldwing site. they are more orientated to the older 70's goldwings like yours and bringing them back to life. That is not to say there are many here also that know there way around the 70's goldwings.
Restoring old bikes is different than restoring old cars in some ways. Defanatly less work and far cheaper Have fun.
Wilf
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I may have a lead on a tank and carbs that are on a 79 that was just parked less than a year ago. The motor locked up. Had looked at the bike on craigs list and someone beat me to it. Be the new owner has it resisted for parts. Talked to him said the tank was full of gas. Can buy those parts for $200.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@ Wilf...Automotive restoration and collecting has become a rich mans game. That is one of the reasons I wanted to try my hand at a Goldwing. The parts costs are not through the roof like cars have become. And there are lots of nice old Wings for sale that the owners just can't ride anymore due to age and health reasons. And most of those bikes have been loved and cared for and with a little TLC can become someone elses pride and joy. I on the other hand buy the basket case LOL but the price was right.
 

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I've owned my 78 Wing since new and have done all maintenance on it for the past 34 years. So let me offer a few suggestions.

You have already identified the obvious things, like cleaning the carbs, timing belts, etc.

The weak areas on these bikes are:

1. gas tank corrosion. There are lots of threads on this site about that.
2. corrosion on the underside of the exhaust where the mufflers connect to the exhaust manifold
3. corrosion at the bottom of the frame where the center stand pivots
4. The infamous "3 yellow wires"coming out of the stator. Lots on this site about that.
5. worn seals in the oil pump/water pump assembly. Check for coolant or oil dripping from the weep hole under the engine. If so, the pump must be replaced.
6. Rear shocks. If these are the factory originals, replace them with Progressive Suspension units.
 

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You have great enthusiasm. This is simple, take it apart and clean, de-rust, polish and paint. Then put it back together with all new grease, oil and rubber. At 50K you will have a brand new '78 GL1000 that you can pass down to your heirs.

Seriously, the first thing you need to do is decide how deep of a restoration you want. There are guys who take an older wing and just do what it takes to get it running. Then there are guys who make them better than new.

Spend some time looking at restoration logs on this site. I would advise a minimum safety standard of new tires, brake overhaul including new hoses and new wheel bearings. For reliability a carb overhaul, check and clean the gas tank, replace the cambelts, valve guide seals, water pump, radiator hoses, fuel pump, fuel filter, fuel hoses, battery, drive shaft lube, swing arm bearing lube, headstock bearing lube. radiator cleaning, control cable lube, fork seals, shocks and electrical inspection and cleaning. Have a note book and make lots of diagrams.

Be sure to keep a log and share with us. We love watching the progress people make. Also, there is a lot of help and ideas here.
 

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1993 gl1500, 1976 gl1000
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