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Replaced main fuse, checked others. Two of the 5A fuse sockets would not carry current across them, even with good fuses. This lead me to a short somewhere. There is a black wire running from the stator wiring at battery -- one hot lead goes to points/breaker; second goes along left side under pod cover to the wiring harness. It was intermittent, then all of a sudden it tested good with my light and gauge lights were on. I fired up the bike -- now i'm deaf in right ear due to backfire!!!

A previous owner wired in a manual fan switch. Far as i can tell from wiring diagram, this black wire running from stator/alternator/points wiring to the front is somehow wired to the fan switch, so it was re-routed? Wonder why it is constant hot, and has been spliced in the middle under the left pod. Maybe it originally split off to fan motor switch.

Anyway, bike works great now. Thanks for helping.
 

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mag

A previous owner wired in a manual fan switch.

I wonder why the previous owner wired in a manual fan switch. Does theoriginal thermalswitch work?
 

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The OEM fan switch is probably faulty and the previous owner was too cheap to buy a new one. Either that or the OEM switch does work and the owner just wanted to control the fan for extra cooling in hot weather. If the OEM switch does work I'd be inclined to get rid of the bodged one.
 

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Budegan wrote:
The OEM fan switch is probably faulty and the previous owner was too cheap to buy a new one. Either that or the OEM switch does work and the owner just wanted to control the fan for extra cooling in hot weather. If the OEM switch does work I'd be inclined to get rid of the bodged one.
Me too, I really can't see how having a manual switch helps much. I drive buses that have manual fan switches but that's mainly in case the thermal switch fails. It's kinda liketaking out athermostat and expecting that to correct overheating problems.
 

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Thanks for your help, everyone. How would i test the thermo/fan switch? Do i need to remove it, put it in boiling water, or a simple ohmmeter test?
 

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mag wrote:
Thanks for your help, everyone. How would i test the thermo/fan switch? Do i need to remove it, put it in boiling water, or a simple ohmmeter test?
Does your fan come on at all if you don't manually switch it on?If it does the switch islikely okay.If the engine doesn't get hot enough to bring the fan on, you could block the radiator with some cardboard and watch the temp gauge, if it getsmuch above three quarterscale and the fan doesn't come on that's a good indicationthe thermo switch is kaput. Don't overheat the engine to the boiling point while testing.
 

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Ok, let me clarify: i believe the thermo switch has been BYPASSED. Wires run to the switch at the handlebars, mounted next to choke lever. The bike definitely overheats if the fan is not manually turned on (such as when synching carbs). Is it possible the manual switch was wired with the (faulty) thermo switch still in place/wired?
 

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mag wrote:
The bike definitely overheats if the fan is not manually turned on ?
There is a serious overheating problem to fix first, should not be doing that in B.C. its cold up there.

From your first post, Id assume the ignition wiring is bad (because it backfired) and that can easily overheat the engine.

Some riders added a manual switch so they could start the fan in anticipation of it getting hot, with the factory fan switch setup, and overheating, the fan will come on, but the temperature will overshoot and peg the gauge, so theyd turn them on early. Theyd turn them on in parades or long stop lights knowing the rise is coming,.
 

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Dave -- would the bike not have backfired after MANY attempts cranking the engine, checking plugs, with no spark/compression. Then sudden spark/ignition -- boom!

Second, i would assume this fan switch was wired because the thermo switch is dead, and the idiot was too cheap to replace it for $85.
 

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Dave Campbell wrote:

There is a serious overheating problem to fix first, should not be doing that in B.C. its cold up there.

From your first post, Id assume the ignition wiring is bad (because it backfired) and that can easily overheat the engine.

[/quote]

the bike does NOT overheat. It takes a lot for it to reach high temp., such as extended idling during tune-up/carb balancing.
 

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There are a lot of wings set up with a manual switch. Without airflow over the radiator, a 1000 will get hot in about 10 min. If you are moving even slowly, the temp will return to normal. If the bike runs well, don't worry bout it.

Bill
 

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mag wrote:
Ok, let me clarify: i believe the thermo switch has been BYPASSED. Wires run to the switch at the handlebars, mounted next to choke lever. The bike definitely overheats if the fan is not manually turned on (such as when synching carbs). Is it possible the manual switch was wired with the (faulty) thermo switch still in place/wired?
Yes of course it is, and you can do it even if the factory switch is still working. All you need do is splice a wire into the wire each side of the swith and put your switch in between.
To test the switch in the bike you need to connect a multi-meter (set to continuity) to each wire coming from the factory switch (or put one to ground in the case of some car single wire setups). Run the engine until it gets hot enough for the switch to operate. If you get a continuity reading and the fan doesn't come on then the switch is working and the fan is at fault (we know your is working). If you don't get a reading then the switch is duff.
You can test the switch in boiling water as well this way, with the meter connected to each wire as you boil it up.
 
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