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Hi Everyone, I've rebuilt and polished my carbs and have been wondering what to do with the cracked plastic buttons on top of the carbs. I ran the engine after reinstalling the carb set and it ran terrible. Then, I smeared black silicone rtv over all 4 plastic tops and warmed the engine up again. Right from the start the engine was smoother and more responsive. As the heat developed with the rad fan cycling on and off a couple of times the silicone seemed to be under pressure and began to bulge and lift a bit on one of the carbs.

The carbs aren't synced yet but the engine already seems brand new! So, what suggestions do you gurus and non-gurus have out there for this problem? Thanks and Merry Christmas or secular holiday! Jim
 

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I'd be cautious with epoxy, most of them soften around 150 degrees F or so. Incoming air might keep the stuff from softening, but once the bike is shut down there might be a bit of heat build up.
 

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If you're on a budget, and if you don't mind the color, high temperature RTV should work. (They might also make it in other colors than red.)
 

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OK, I'll send him a message. I am trying to do this the strongest but cheapest method possible. If I purchase new cv bells, then I probably will need to replace the pistons, too...
 

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What kind of epoxy is this? I tried some Lock-Tite two part epoxy on one white plastic button two months ago but it is hard to make it look good. Now I'ld settle for anything that works! Thanks, Jim
 

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You can try JB Weld because it stands up to high temperatures. Believe it or not, I once used JB Weld on a holed piston in a 2 stroke outboard motor and it worked well enough to get me home, after I richened the fuel mixture and feathered the throttle.

(I was in the middle of no where(northern Canada)with my boat broke down with a holed piston. I removed the head, cleaned up the piston and filled the hole with JB Weld then reassembled the head, richened the mixture and got home slowly, but safely. It sure beat walking 10 miles then going back to trailer the boat home LOL.)

I don't suggest it for long term use though because it will breakdown eventually.

Vic
 

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Araldite is about the best of the two-part epoxys, you can get it in formulations for soft or hard plastics.
 

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JB Weld works well sealing old bolt and cable holes in aircraft firewalls, they are subjected to a lot of vibration and heat. I don't know how well the stuff sticks to plastic though.
 
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