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I changed the rear tire on my 1100 I 1980 last week and noticed the brake pads were almost gone . I reassembled everything so I could ride then ordered the new pads for both wheels. Is it easier to remove the wheel to change the brakes or the side saddle bag. and are there any unusual things to look for on either wheel? Thanks in advance for any info.
 

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It's not difficult but do you have an OEM manual or Clymer manual? While you've got your caliper(s) off, it would probably be a good thing to go ahead and rebuild them. It doesn't cost a lot and is fairly straight-foward to do. However, to go into all of the details here will be a lengthy bit of writing.

The reason I suggest rebuilding them is that they build up crud in the piston area and will cause the brake(s) to not work as well and drag more than necessary. However, if you're not comfortable with this, please have it done by a knowledgeable mechanic. It's one thing not to be able to go, but a whole 'nother ballgame not being able to stop.

You can get the OEM manual for your bike at http://www.helminc.com as well as the Clymer(I think)manual. Well worth the money.

Once again, please don't tackle this project unless you feel comfortable and have enough mechanical skills to do it right the first time. I would hate to give advise to someone and then have them go out and get in a wreck.:shock:

Regards,

Hobie
 

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Removing the saddlebag is much easier. As suggested it may also be a good idea to overhaul the unit while it's off but it may just need a clean up. If the pistons are pitted it's probably best to change them and the seals.
 

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Chiming in with the rest. Take the saddlebag off. Take a real good look at the pistons when you have the pads off before you push them back in the caliper. If they are nice and clean and not corroded it's pretty safe to wipe them with brake fluid and push them in. The best procedure is to replace the seals and dust seals. They cost around $20 or less for each caliper. If there's any crud that doesn' wipe off the exposed part of the pistons you really should replace the seals, the dirt going back into the cylinder if a cruddy piston is shoved back in will eventually chew up the seal and promote leaks. Remember the engine is the third most important part of a bike, brakes and steering come first!
 

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BenMC wrote:
goldwingnut wrote:
Thanks for the thought on rebuilding the caliper . I definitly can and will.
Best of luck with it goldwingnut,take you time and be careful with the big hammer!:bash2:
At least keep your fingers clear of it!:cheeky1:
 
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