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I recently had both my front and rear brake switches fail on me with-in two weeks of one and other. One was before a trip and the other after the trip. The front just needed to be cleaned and the rear was physically broken but was easily fixed. The rear switch was the first to go and was discovered the night before my trip as I did a safety check. I did not have time to order a new one in so I fixed it. It has been working great ever since.

This may help someone else in a pinch so I though I would post it. Many models of Hondas share the same type of switch. Squirting in a cleaner does not always work or work well for long.

Tim.
 

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Front Brake Switch



To remove the front brake switch from the bike is simple. A single Philips screw is removed from under the front break leaver and the switch is gently pulls down. Then remove the two wires attached to the switch.

I cleaned the connectors on the wires with a bit of CLR and rinsed them well with water. The come out looking like new. A bit of dielectric grease here and you’re done.

The actual switch is sealed in three spots. The top has pins that goes through bottom half and then is melted over like a rivet. The switch readily comes apart by taking an appropriate size drill bit and simply drilling the “top” off the melted rivet. A little wiggling of the two halves and apart they come.

Once apart you will have 5 pieces to deal with as pictured. The parts are easily removed by gently pulling them out of the bottom half. The 3 plastic pieces were cleaned with soap, water and an old tooth brush. The two switch parts were cleaned in CLR for a minute or so… not to much though as not to remove the plating on them. I removed the bulk of the dirt beforehand.

I took a bit of emery cloth and cleaned up the actual contact surfaces. They were a bit pitted and this was the root of the problem I was having. Squirting “switch cleaner” would not have corrected this issue.

The parts were reinstalled back into the bottom half and a smidgen of dielectric grease was added to the contact surfaces. The switch was tested open like this with the continuity part of my multi Meter to make sure the switch is working perfectly before I seal up the switch.

3 drops of Crazy Glue was added to the holes that the top half mates to and then the top half was pressed into place. TA DA!!! You’re done. Reinstall the switch, attach your wires and test to make sure your brake lights work. There is no adjustment necessary.

 

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Rear Brake Switch



To remove the rear brake switch from the bike is easy. First, remove the two wires from the switch and then remove the spring that goes from the brake pedal to the switch with a pair of needle nose pliers. The switch then simply unscrews from the plastic nut in the frame of the bike. I cleaned the connectors at the end of the wires with CLR and rinsed well with water. A bit of dielectric grease was applied to the connectors.

It is easy to disassemble the switch but care is needed. The two connectors where the wires connect is part of a plastic “end plug” that fits into the threaded plastic part of the switch. You need to insert a small screw driver into each (there are two) of the side indents and gently work this plug out.

Once out you will find that there are several parts including the threaded body, an “O” ring type of seal, a spring, the plunger (with switch contact) and the end “plug” that you just removed.

PLEASE NOTE that in my picture below, the plunger (with switch contact) is in two pieces. It’s not supposed to be. That was my problem. In my case, I cleaned the parts and then Crazy Glued the plunger and contacts back together. My switch was broken along with being dirty.

Clean all the parts in hot soapy water and then dip the plunger (with the contacts intact) into some CLR. Not to long as to remove the plating on the contacts. Make sure that the plunger shaft is free of built up dirt and rust. Mine had bit surface rust on it. You want this smooth. Clean things with an old tooth brush. Do the same thing the copper contacts on the “”end plug”. Make sure that the grooves where the “O” ring seal is are clean and that the “O” ring is clean as well.

After all parts are dry, put the seal in the proper grove in the threaded body, put the spring in the body, grease the plunger shaft and larger plastic piece the lithium grease and put that into the threaded body.

Apply a smidgen of dielectric grease on the plunger contact and then some to the copper contact on the “end plug”. Carefully push the plunger all the way through the threaded body and then install the brake pedal spring through the plungers little hole. That stops the internal spring from shooting the plunger back out and allows the “end plug” to snap in easier. Just line up the “end plug” and gently snap into place. Remove the brake pedal spring for now to allow and easier install of the switch.

Thread the switch back into the bike, reinstall the brake pedal spring and adjust the “sensitivity” of the switch by how deep you screw it into the bike. I found it much easier to not connect the brake wires yet. I used my multi meter and some alligator clips to do my fine tuning and then hooked up my wires. That puts less ware and tear on the wires and connectors as you would have to take them on/off many times until you have the adjustment right.

Reinstall your brake wires and test. Make sure that your brake lights are working and then… TA DA!! You’re done.
 

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