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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have started "cleaning" all the shiney parts (chrome) on my old girl. I discovered the best way (easiest) for me is using chrome polish and a Dremel tool with a soft aluminum brush bit. It works wonders on the surface rust.

I am curious, however, as to how long it will remain looking pretty. I suspect that I need to protect it with something, but I don't know what.

Can anyone make a recommendation of some sort of wax that will coat the chrome and keep the rust away? Also, I need to use the same thing on the pipes, so that is why I am asking. I figure the standard Turtle Wax will simply melt off a hot pipe.

Thanks
 

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Hi TC, I've never found anything that will stop rust once it has started. The chrome polish will clean it up and make it look good, but the pin hole is still there and new rust will come through it to the surface. Recleaning with chrome polish every few monthe will keep it looking good though.
 

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I read on one post to spray it with clear laquer when finished, I dont know if there is a heat resistance laquer. check with an auto paint store.
 

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Lacquer will make it ugly as soon as you spray it on. You can ride or you can polish.
 

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I'll save the time and just ride, besides it get washed when it rains
 

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:sadguy: That's jut too much work time and cuts into the ride time....
That's the facts of chrome exposed to the moisture. Just have to use elbow grease every now and then. My wheels are chrome and if not cleaned regularly every month, the brake dust starts flaking the chrome, I spent @1 hr on the front wheel Friday. Chrome cleaner and a rag mixed with lots of elbow grease.
But the comments on the ride yesterday in the sun made up for the effort.
I didn't put any of the chrome on my bike, infact, I have removed a lot. Many riders are now going the blacked out route to save cleaning time. That's probably why Honda has the new wing model with lots of black.
 

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The worst issue with rust is that when you think that it's gone, back it comes. The "pinhole" comment is exactly correct. There are very small holes in the metal surface that rust is trapped in and even though it looks good, it's not gone. It will return. Covering the surface with lacquer only will trap the rust below it. The only way to completely eradicate rust is to either excise it or chemically treat it. The problem with most chemical treatments is that even though they work, and some very well, they often turn the surface converted black. You will never remove rust on plated surfaces and have it gone for good along with preserving the plating relatively intact. This is why many have older chromed items replated. Once chromed things rust, it's pretty much done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The proble with replating is finding someone to do it. I have talked to a customer of mine who refurbishes industrial equipment. He said he knows of a place two states away who used to re-chrome, but is not sure if they do it any more. He said the issue is cost, due to the chemical process and the EPA getting involved. Don't know if that is true, but if it were not so costly and highly regulated, I assume it would be easy to find a re-plater.
 
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