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I"m new to this forum and have seen a lot of good info here, hoping to get some help myself. I own an 83 Interstate that I've owned since new. When the bike was new the temp gauge never moved from the 1/3 spot on the gauge while riding only when stopped. After about five years the temp started to gradually climb every summer a little more, now on a hot day it will go over 1/2 and seems to get worse the faster I go. I have replaced the stat several times, water pump, rad was re-cored. I've had the pump out since twice and it turns, flushed system completely. I've hot wired the fan. A mechanic said could be head gaskets, changed them too, no change. Had the carb pistons replaced by honda on recall when bike was year old and periodically they still stick,STP gas treatment usually fixed this after a tank or two, now I notice when bike is hot they hang up more, could these be making the bike run lean and run hot. Any help would be apreciated. Thanks:stumped:
 

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Are you really sure the motor is hot. Have you considered the possibilty that the 7 volt regulator for the gages is bad?
 

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Thanks for the thought, I think the gauge is fine, on an average day less than 80 degrees or short runs less than half an hour it shows perfect right at the 1/3 notch, but any hotter or run on highway over 65 miles an hour it climbs, faster or longer you go the hotter it gets and if feels hot. I've had it 25 years, its hot. but i will check the gauge regulator anyway, always good to rule it out. Thanks
 

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:waving::waving: Welcome to the World's Greatest Goldwing Site honabago! :waving::waving:

I'd be suspicious of the radiator. I know you had it recored but it sounds typical of a bad radiator. The system just can't shed heat fast enough when higher power levels are demanded. You could use an IR thermometer and take some readings on the front of the radiator, you should see a smooth decrease in heat from the top to the bottom of the radiator and fairly steady readings scanning across the radiatorfrom side to side. Hot or cold spots are an indication of a radiator problem. Harbor Freight sells IR thermometers quite inexpensively that will do the job for you. Taking the thermostatic switch out of the circuit won't really help any, if the system can't purge the heat it doesn't matter if the fan is already on or comes on at the heat comes up.
 

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Or a thermostat not opening all the way.
 

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This also a common sign of a radiator that hasn't been burped after re-filling. Check the coolant level in the radiator after it's ran and at operating temp, not at the coolant overflow bottle but at the radiator itself. Top off as needed.
 

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Forgot to mention, one quick check for a partially blocked radiator is to remove the radiator cap, not the expansion tank cap, and watch the coolant level as you rev up and slow down the engine. The level in the radiator neck should stay pretty constant if the flow is unrestricted. If it rises and falls noticeably it's most likely blocked some where. If you see bubbles coming up in the neck it's an indication of a leaking head gasket.
 

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Check the fan. It may be running but not at the proper speed. You can disassemble the fan, replace brushes and lubricate the bearings.
 

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Not likely a fan problem if the overheating occurs at highway speeds, there's plenty of wind through the radiator then.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
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Thanks all you guys for the tips, I think we can rule out hte stat its been changed several times, no change. I spent a lot of time burping the sucker all the times that I've meesed with it and yes Paul the level does change with rpm so I've pulled the rad (lot of work on an Interstate) and its going to the rad shop monday. Thanks again and I'll keep you posted
 

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Honestly, if the bike doesn't ever overheat, I wouldn't worry about it. You've done a lot already.

It's entirely possible the bike is slowly changing it's mixture setting. You should have seen the crud built up in my 83 Interstate's carb bowls.
 

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The greatest thing about Goldwings is that they are SO forgiving of their (sometimes) idiot owners =)...Case in point: Riding in a (cluster ***) of a rally about 10 years ago on my 81 wing... 100 degree day, way too many riders on way too little road through way high hills,,, stop and go riding for a good 20 minutes or so... My wing got so hot that the clutch lever finally would not release and I looked like one of those fog machines as my coolant container puked all over the bike sending up a cloud of noxious "coolant fog"... I finally got p*!sed, hit the emergency stop switch, laid the bike over on its side by the curb and walked to a convenience store for a soda. Came out about 30 minutes later, picked up the bike from the curb, started her up and rode off like nothing ever happened... I got 250,000 trouble free miles out of that wing before I (finally) spun a bearing (my fault, too, but that's a different story).. The early GL's are good bikes with very few electrical doo dads. That's why I stay with 'em....
Good luck on the overheating but I wouldn't sweat it (pun intended) too much. =)
 

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Have you replaced the temp sending unit? it may be whats giving you false readings if your not actually overheating.,,
 

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Yup replaced the temp sender and the fan switch, not taking any chances!, Had the rad checked, flushed and pressure tested. Said it was in good shape just a tiny leak at the lower tank near the lower rad hose fitting and they fixed all that in 15 minutes and didn't want anything for the job. Said they dont get to work on small stuff much anymore.
I'll have to drop back over soon with some coffee for them.
 

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You're probably right, why sweat it (pun). Makes for a challenge though! No harm in making sure all is well, wouldn't want to harm an old friend
 

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Hello, I have a 82 1100 Standard and went thru the same stuff. Replaced everything but the gauge still showed hot. The bike did not appear to be overheating though. Took a temp reading with thermal gun, then the bike shop put a resister in line to the gauge and everything was fine. It comes down to if you can:t see the gauge you:d be fine, wouldn:t you....
 

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A non-contact IR thermometer is a good tool for checking out overheating issues. You can easily check the temperature of the top tank on the radiator to see if it agrees with the temperature gauge on the bike. Most service manuals (get one from the FAQ and Reference forum if you don't have one) will tell you what temperatures correlate with different needle positions on the gauge. A manual will also tell you how to directly check the calibration of your gauge and sensor to make sure it's not lying. It's pretty simple, basically dipping the sensor's business end in a can of oil heated by a torch with the 7V supply from the bike feeding the circuit.

BTW you can get a low cost IR thermometer from Harbor Freight that's very useful for work on and around cars and bikes.
 
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