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I just spent the biggest part of the last two days getting the fuel tank removed from my '83 interstate. And it's true what other's have said about this job on this forum. It's like giving birth. But nobody mentioned a thing about the 9 hours of labor that goes with this birthing. :headbanger:The tank is out... Thier is "orange' rust pitting the interior throughout the tank.... I used a very large wire handled brush that fit through the sending unit opening. And with a gallon of gas still in the tank commeced to scrubbing the interior. bending the wire handle to be sure and get every cranny i could. i did this to release what was sticking to the tank walls. The brush ? it's called a "carboy brush"... for glass wine fermentors. just thought i would pass this idea along........ yes, i would like to coat this tank. However, i see no way to prevent any coating from stopping up the screens on the lines inside the tank. i was wanting to use a coating that left a "epoxy type" coating after curing time. Because the tank has a flat bottom, and the lines are spot welded to the bottom. I see no viable way to properly use a coating of any type in this tank. So, i opted for a very old school method to remove the rust that is present... a lot of you are probably familiar with "reverse electroylisis".. While other'sare not. I am performing this method as i write this post. It's just a process where the rust that is present is converted from "iron oxide" to "magnatite" in place of the rust... Water, washing soda, And a electrical current is all that's used.. The washing soda buffers the formation of hydrocloric acid.. But it will still produce hydrogen. So, caution is needed as to being around sparks etc.. The last visual inspection of this process? There is a big frothy mess of "orange/brown" foam exiting the sending unit opening in the tank.. i do beleive it's working. "Knowbuddy"
 

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There's been quite a few posts about cleaning fuel tanks with electrolysis. I've used the method to clean small parts as well, the method removes rust, paint, grease and a lot of corrosion. If you do a search on the forum you'll find lots of information on the subject and links to at least a couple pictorial how to do its. If you clean the tank well it really isn't necessary to coat the tank. It might be worth treating the tank with a conversion chemical such as "Navy Jelly" or the like. A radiator shop can do a good shop cleaning rusty fuel tanks as well. Even if you don't coat the tank as long as the tank is kept full when the bike is stored or not used for lengthy periods internal corrosion will be greatly reduced over leaving the tank nearly empty which allows more condensation to accumulate.
 

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I think I'll flush mine out this winter but instead of trying to birth a gas tank I'll go the Evapo-rust method and flush it good.
 

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There was mainly corrosion present in the tank. very little deep pitting and flaking. ( amazing after 26 years)After brushing the interior and flushing out several times with wateri heat dried it. (Wife's blow dryer) to get a better view of how bad it was... Not as bad as i expected!. I could still see area's of bright metal in the tank. All this could be from the fact that it sat in a heated gararge topped up with fuel and a entire can of seafoam in it?...left it that wayall winter.... to cook off the varnish and other gunk.. Now it's getting "electrolysis therapy"... About your tip on Naval Jelly: NavalJelly is fine.. But i prefer PermatexRust Remover (pink stuff) because of it's ease of use. Naval Jelly stillmakes you exercise a little...And it aint' all that great on heavier corrosion (within reason)...I just like the way Permatex acts on some of the heavier areas. just my preference.... and what i'll use after the electolysis process has done all it can do. figure i will have to change out the soloution today. It's been cooking off all nite. we'll see....? As you can tell, i am in no hurry..... As always, thanks for your input!. "Knowbuddy"
 

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You can coat the tank with a sealer and not block the screens if you are careful. I have done three tanks..with POR15. Their small kit $30 did all three..You just use very little of the sealer and rotate the tank VERY slowly. On my daily rider it's been almost three years and the sealer is still in tact. No bubbling or peeling. I followed their directions carefully.
 
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