Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
1985 GL1200 LTD
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Messed up and forced one of the pistons back in. Pretty stupid move on my part. I’m going to take it to a shop and see if they can get it out but it ain’t looking good.
I’m looking at calipers on eBay. There’s one oem that’s almost $400. There are some that are single piston that eBay claims works on my bike. I’m dubious. Has anyone seen these and do they work?

eBay Caliper
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,891 Posts
No, a single piston caliper will not work. What you can do is get a 3/8 npt grease zerk and screw it into the brake line hole, it's not exact but will work (don't screw it in too tight), block the other piston so it can't come out, attach a grease gun and pump it out. Or attach it to the brake line and do the same thing with the brake pedal.
 

·
Registered
1985 GL1200 LTD
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No, a single piston caliper will not work. What you can do is get a 3/8 npt grease zerk and screw it into the brake line hole, it's not exact but will work (don't screw it in too tight), block the other piston so it can't come out, attach a grease gun and pump it out. Or attach it to the brake line and do the same thing with the brake pedal.
I think the brake line solution may work the best. Need to wait til I get the front right on first I think. Right now all 3 calipers are off the bike. Awaiting 3 new slide pins, 6 boots, and 1 piston.

While we're here... the slide pin hole on that same rear caliper has a lot of corrosion. Was considering a dremel with 800 grit. Is that too coarse?
 

·
Registered
1985 GL1200 LTD
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Another consideration: I am using a small compressor with about 110psi on it and it's not budging. With that in mind, are either toe grease gun or brake pedal going to provide more psi than that?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,891 Posts
I think the brake line solution may work the best. Need to wait til I get the front right on first I think. Right now all 3 calipers are off the bike. Awaiting 3 new slide pins, 6 boots, and 1 piston.

While we're here... the slide pin hole on that same rear caliper has a lot of corrosion. Was considering a dremel with 800 grit. Is that too coarse?
It may not be coarse enough.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,891 Posts
Another consideration: I am using a small compressor with about 110psi on it and it's not budging. With that in mind, are either toe grease gun or brake pedal going to provide more psi than that?
Either one makes waaaaaaaaaay more pressure than that.
 

·
Registered
1985 GL1200 LTD
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts
To clean up the slide pin holes would recommend a small round file, will work fine, doesn't take long, and you are less likely to take off too much material. Do a little at a time, and dry fit the pins. Use a synthetic grease for brake calipers - sparingly - when you assemble. On the old pins, use a 200/300 grit wet/dry sandpaper and clean.

Maintenance recommendation would be to remove clean lubricate every two to three years - keeps the pins from seizing.

If you are near to a Harbor Freight outlet, you can get a caliper piston remover that you can use at the same time as pressurizing the backside of the piston. Fill the cavity of the caliper with water, and pressurize. Use the caliper piston removal tool to work the piston out. You can also use a set of channel locks, be careful to only put the channel locks on the first 1/4 to 3/8 of an inch of the piston. File any marks smooth. Should not impact on the dust and piston seals.
 

·
Registered
1985 GL1200 LTD
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
To clean up the slide pin holes would recommend a small round file, will work fine, doesn't take long, and you are less likely to take off too much material. Do a little at a time, and dry fit the pins. Use a synthetic grease for brake calipers - sparingly - when you assemble. On the old pins, use a 200/300 grit wet/dry sandpaper and clean.

Maintenance recommendation would be to remove clean lubricate every two to three years - keeps the pins from seizing.

If you are near to a Harbor Freight outlet, you can get a caliper piston remover that you can use at the same time as pressurizing the backside of the piston. Fill the cavity of the caliper with water, and pressurize. Use the caliper piston removal tool to work the piston out. You can also use a set of channel locks, be careful to only put the channel locks on the first 1/4 to 3/8 of an inch of the piston. File any marks smooth. Should not impact on the dust and piston seals.
Thanks for the tips. I just received my 3 new pins and 6 new boots today. 2 of the pins were pitted on nearly the entirety of the shaft. They weren't bad. $11 each. I bought 1 new piston to replace the only 1 I couldn't clean, also due to pitting.

Didn't consider round file. Glad you mentioned it. You mentioned dry fitting pins. So don't put light grease on them? I was going to put a very light layer on if for nothing else but corrosion control.
 

·
Registered
1985 GL1200 LTD
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Grease gun was the way to go here btw. Never done that before. The best-fitting zerk is M8x1.25 if you want. Bolt to plug the bigger hole is M10x1.25
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top