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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
4 Jan 2019

I finished up my craigslist rebuild on the exhaust, except I actually masked off the shiny bits before the spray paint. I had two M6 spiral taps so I ground one to a bottom tap and cleaned up the threads in the exhaust holding the chrome bits on, sprayed all the ugly with exhaust paint and put it all back together. My tires came so I spooned the rear tire on and balanced it, then reinstalled. Man, these fat tires on little rims are a pain. Also since this is a racewing, I threw a spare racing aluminum 90* valve stem in. Seriously, why don't every bike ever come with these from the factory?
Cleaned up threads in exhaust by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Exhaust drying after repaint by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
New rear tire installed on the balancing rig by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
4 Jan 2019

I ran a tap through all the threads in the exhaust and used antisieze on all the bolts. Had to drill out and replace one broken bolt on the front clamp. To get it to go on I once again summoned the power of ratchet straps and ran one down each side pulling the exhaust forward, and I just kept wiggling it a little then adding more tension. My electrical bits came in so I added the protective sleeve to the stator wires and connected them straight to the rectifier. Right now it's holding a steady 14.9v at almost all RPMs.
Using ratchet straps to pull exhaust back on by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Upper connections into stator/rectifier-regulator. by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
4 Jan 2019

So when I first examined my project wing there was some less than optimal wiring, with multiple bits of wire, scotchlocks, posilocks, crimps, even wirenuts. The starter relay was the recipient of some of that, as shown. I immediately did a repair, which worked perfectly fine. But it didn't bring joy to my soul as the crazy people say, so I purchased the correct connector and redid it back to factory. I also have a line on an '86 parts bike for cheap money, which I'll hopefully be going to pick up Sunday. Apparently runs but doesn't charge the battery, so I'm assuming shot stator. Don't care, I'm swiping the carbs and anything else I feel may be useful. On the off chance the stator's fine and it's just the wiring then I may cut the parts bike in half and keep the engine for a future project.
Correct style connectors and crimper by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Factory style connector, final repair by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
4 Jan 2019

The rear air shocks had a serious case of the oxides, so they needed love. The chrome was too far gone for polish. Once again, is there anything that can't involve a lathe to make it better? I pulled off the shock boot and chucked the shock in the lathe, set the carriage as if it was cutting a 10tpi thread and laid the grinder on it. Finished with a nice, level, toothy finish perfect to hold paint. Chucked it in my welding positioner and spun it with the drill, and added a couple coats of VHT caliper paint. Seriously, this stuff may be awesomer than the VHT Epoxy paint I usually use.
Rear shocks chrome totally gone by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Shock chucked in lathe by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Chrome removed to base metal using flap wheel in grinder by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Repainted by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
5 Jan 2019

Drained and pulled the radiator, yanked the front covers and replaced the timing belts. Also turned some aluminum adapters, one of which I installed a Schrader valve in so I could pressure test the radiator. I grabbed a spare Honda hose clamp from a parts gl1k, sandblasted and painted it. Also drained the rear diff in preparation of refilling it, pain because the drain isn't the lowest spot so I sucked a bunch more out with my brake bleeder now I'm jamming shop towels in it to soak up the rest.
New timing belts by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Fresh oil in rear diff by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
5 Jan 2019

The belt covers were ugly so I tried a few different finishes on them, and settles on a satin polish which I arrived at by sandblasting them then gently wirebrushing them with first a bench mounted wheel then a grinder with a worn out wire cup brush. They'll need regular cleaning and application of nevrdull but that's ok. I also filled the rear diff, reinstalled the shocks and hooked up their air lines.
Radiator removed, belt covers before polish by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
6 Jan 2019

Picked up a running parts bike for small money. It's in pretty rough shape but it runs and has a good set of carbs, and for some reason a Jardine exhaust. I'll grab the bits I need, eBay enough to get my money back and junk the rest.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
11 Jan 2019

Swapped and balanced the front tire, which involved much cursing. Also added a racing 90* valve stem facing to the right, which would have been easy except that it was in my gear cabinet three bikes deep. Then polished up more stuff, reinstalled the front fender, wheel, and brakes. Replaced the boots on the TRAC system. Clay bar, cutting and polishing compound on the front fender, final polish and wax will happen when the whole bike's back together.
New tire, 90* valve stem, balanced by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Front put back together by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
11 Jan 2019

Pulled the valve covers, sandblasted and wire wheeled them to match the belt covers. Paint and polish tomorrow. Also pulled off the right side engine guard and polished it, the left side can't come off without pulling the exhaust so I polished it in place. Also wire wheeled the headers as much as possible, masked off and high-heat painted everything I could get to that needed it.
corroded aluminum valve cover by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Valve cover before by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Paint stripped off and re-wire-wheeled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
12 Jan 2019

Used the wire wheel to clean up the overspray on my valve covers, then gave them a coat of nevrdull. Also brought them in the house and washed thoroughly, because I was concerned about leftover sandblasting media and my wife wasn't home. The bolts were ugly, so I chucked them in the drill, gently wire wheeled them then once again went to my sponsor (not really but they should) nev-r-dull to clean them up.
Valve cover bolt, before by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Valve cover bolt final, after polish by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
12 Jan 2019

I reinstalled the valve covers and engine guards. The mounting hardware for the guards got blasted, cleaned, painted, and the upper straps were covered with adhesive-lined heat shrink to minimize metal to metal contact. I also bled the brakes and clutch. Pictured is the clutch gel, formerly fluid. Rear brake was fun because it's a linked system that operates the rear and right front with the pedal. Also it's on the lift so I can't see down into the handlebar reservoirs to see how full they are and the sight lenses are totally opaque so I had to go by dipping my fingers in.
After reassembly of valve cover and polished guard by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Very old clutch 'fluid' by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Rusty guard mount hardware by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
blasted and painted mounting hardware by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #34 (Edited)
12 Jan 2019

The neutral light didn't work, and I assume neither did the overdrive light. On this bike there are a few possibilities for that; bad diode, bad switch, bad installation. I checked the switch and it didn't give me any of the correct readings so I assumed bad install. Drained the new oil and pulled the front cover. Holy hell, there's some gross stuff in there. Sludge doesn't do it justice, this was gak-level slime. It even seems fairly impervious to brake cleaner, ended up having to scoop it out by hand, with a screwdriver, and paper towels. Also brought the cover to the parts washer and gave it a thorough scrubbing. Pulled the switch and it tested fine, so I'm assuming it was installed backwards. I gave the switch a solid cleaning with electrical contact cleaner, re-tested it and ordered a new gasket set for reinstallation.
Sludge found under front cover by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Sludge by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
12 Jan 2019

Since I was otherwise at a work slowdown I pulled the carb. The goal is to put the bike back together enough to roll it off the lift and put the parts bike on so I can grab the carbs off of it plus whatever other parts seem useful. The carb is on eBay. Now I'm cleaning up the top of the engine.
Top of engine corrosion by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
EMPI aftermarket carb removed by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #36 (Edited)
12 Jan 2019

Not pictured but the rear foot pegs, front Peg covers, and left engine chrome heel guard have been in evaporust for a few weeks. They were pulled out, scrubbed and rinsed off and reinstalled looking so much better than they did. The engine rear cam covers were both pulled and dropped into the evaporust and I sanded and painted the coolant tubes on top of the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
13 Jan 2019

So because Honda there are some built-in electrical challenges. Stock, the power comes from the battery to the starter relay, where it then goes through the ignition switch, then to the fuse box where that single wire feeds five fuses. It then goes through one of those fuses, through the starter button, then through the headlight switch, through a connector and finally makes its way to the headlight itself. With much voltage drop. If you only have 12v to work with, losing a volt is 1/12 of your power. I created a short harness that runs from the battery through a 30a fuse to two 12g wires which run in loom along the stock harness. One of the two goes to a 40a relay which uses the stock power wire to the fuse box as it's trigger, then from the relay on over to the fuse box. I also grabbed a stock ground point on the frame and ran two grounds from it; one goes to the relay, the other terminates next to the other 12g from the battery. Those terminate in a Dean's connector, a hobby RC connector designed for extreme high current (50 amps!) which will connect to the fairing. Once I get the fairing back on I'll add two more relays in it, switched from high and low beam, powered off of this wire. So much better than stock. I measured it at rest and was getting 12.27v at the battery and the deans connector, and 12.25 at the fuse box.
Bypass harness. by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Bypass harness installed by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
13 Jan 2019

Both ends. For comparison, the parts bike is 12.35v at the battery and 12.2 at the fuse panel, with the headlight and running light fuses pulled so there's zero draw on the system. The voltage difference is higher when there's a load.
 

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Discussion Starter #39 (Edited)
14 Jan 2019

Mostly cleanup today but I did get into the fairing and finished the headlight bypass. The two relays get their ground from the stock ground, and are switched by the high and low beam wires. Their power comes from the deans connector I put in the other day, and the ground I put in replaces the stock ground. Everything's color matched, crimped, double insulated heat shrunk, loomed, etc. I reinstalled the fairing to verify that it all works, and it does. All of this is made less relevant later, which I expected.
Bypass harness in fairing by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
14 Jan 2019

I'm doing this refresh because I need a project to keep me what passes for sane. Some people collect stamps, I save bikes from "customizers" who take off the front fender, put on pod filters and call them cafe racers. I've plenty of bikes to ride if that was all the enjoyment I got out of them. Besides, it was a gift from an uncle who loved this bike when it was his, who will get great pleasure out of seeing it back on the road when I'm done.

Oh yeah, another accomplishment for today (besides painting pretty much every bracket and small part that was taken off) was I broke the clutch free. It sat for so long that the clutch plates became overly friendly with each other and refused to end their hug. Since I bled the clutch and got it working again, I was able to zip-tie the clutch lever down, put it in gear, stand on the rear brake and run the starter to break them free.
 
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