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Discussion Starter #81 (Edited)
First thing I did was figure out where I wanted the switches. I decided on the steering stem cover, since that seemed like an easy to reach, easy to replace if I dicked it up part. For added complexity, I installed them on the back instead of the top so they'll be nearly invisible unless on. Measured, marked, drilled, filed slots in the side to register against, then reached rough with a dremel sanding wheel to taper the inside. This was needed because the plastic is too thick for the retainers to grab against. Then I installed the switches, and added a dollop of RTV because I had it right there and why not.
Holes cut, notches filed by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Holes cut, tapered in back to allow switches to snap in by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Switches installed by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Switches installed, cover installed by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #85

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my word, what a lot of work, and what an effort to create all of those posts and with the photos.


I have been reading for a long time, seems like 2 hours now? I woke up at 4 a.m. and it is now after 5.... didn't want to miss anything... :)



Kudos on keeping track of your progress.
the only thing I sensed, was each post did not say what date, that work was done on...



Wish I were close enough to see that in person.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
Thanks! I had thought about times and dates but there was no easy way to capture it in bulk, although i may go through and manually add it in. For reference though, the bike arrived at my house on the 22nd of December, so 45 days so far.
 

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Good work. You're a talented guy.
 

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I'm adding my compliments for a super job on your restoration. I just spent a couple hours reading through everything and enjoyed every minute. I really appreciate all your effort in doing a great job in all your modifications and making it look oem. Again, well done! :thumbsup:
 

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IIRC,


you only have 72 hours to edit each post....
it that gets to be a problem, I can help you get around that issue and make special arrangements to take care of that situation.


You have earned the title "Restoration Guru",


if you don't mind, I would like to add that to your account?
 

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Discussion Starter #91 (Edited)
IIRC,


you only have 72 hours to edit each post....
it that gets to be a problem, I can help you get around that issue and make special arrangements to take care of that situation.


You have earned the title "Restoration Guru",


if you don't mind, I would like to add that to your account?
I'd be honored, thanks! And thanks for pointing out the edit time limit, I just spent my lunch going back and dating each post. From now on everything will be pretty much real time. I use this as a written record of what I've done to the bike, and I try to braindump everything as soon as I finish with it so I don't forget. Looking at my pics I can see that I'm only taking about a third of the pics I should though, it's just disruptive to continually stop what I'm doing (usually while I'm dirty) and light, frame, and take a pic.

Oh yeah, I realize I forgot to mention the joy I had trying to take the bike off the lift for the test ride. I had put the bike on the centerstand by locking the front wheel in the chock, then using a jack to lift the bike up high enough to bring the stand down. Then when I started the front end work I pulled the rear wheel dropout out of the stand and used the jack to lift the front of the bike high enough to unbolt the chock, which I then used for picking up the parts bike. Fast forward to me getting ready to pull the bike off the lift. Now, when I put the chock on the table originally, I had a BMW R1150RT, which is roughly as long as my suburban, so I had it mounted way forward. This puts the front tire of the bike right at the front edge. However, when you take a bike off the centerstand, you have to roll it forward. I did not have that room to roll forward. Nor did I have the chock to be able to lift the bike with a jack and stow the center stand. So, I ran a ratchet strap from the stand to the engine guard, to make sure it couldn't possibly accidentally fold. Then I ran two more ratchet straps from the center stand to the back of the lift table, which meant that I had to take off the ramp. I tightened each strap in turn which pulled the bike slowly back along the table by main force till I felt I had enough room. Then I pulled the straps, popped it off the stand, and remembered I didn't put the ramp back on. Hmm, seems my stupidity level is running pretty high today. So now I'm standing next to the bike, the kickstand won't work on the lift and I can't let it go. I end up wedging a roll of tape, a manual, and a wrench under the side stand to hold it up vertical enough that I can manage the rest with one hand while I work myself to the back and put the ramp back on. Then I take it most of the rest of the way off before I hit something on the floor behind the bike and have the same problem, it's half on the ramp and half off, so once again with the roll of tape and manual to hold the bike up while I deal with what's going on behind it. Just keep this in mind in case anybody gets the mistaken idea that I'm as awesome as I try to make myself sound.
 

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Ha, Ha! Great story about your adventure getting the bike off the lift!
 

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Oh yeah, I realize I forgot to mention the joy I had trying to take the bike off the lift for the test ride. I had put the bike on the centerstand by locking the front wheel in the chock, then using a jack to lift the bike up high enough to bring the stand down. Then when I started the front end work I pulled the rear wheel dropout out of the stand and used the jack to lift the front of the bike high enough to unbolt the chock, which I then used for picking up the parts bike. Fast forward to me getting ready to pull the bike off the lift. Now, when I put the chock on the table originally, I had a BMW R1100RT, which is roughly as long as my suburban, so I had it mounted way forward. This puts the front tire of the bike right at the front edge. However, when you take a bike off the centerstand, you have to roll it forward. I did not have that room to roll forward. Nor did I have the chock to be able to lift the bike with a jack and stow the center stand. So, I ran a ratchet strap from the stand to the engine guard, to make sure it couldn't possibly accidentally fold. Then I ran two more ratchet straps from the center stand to the back of the lift table, which meant that I had to take off the ramp. I tightened each strap in turn which pulled the bike slowly back along the table by main force till I felt I had enough room. Then I pulled the straps, popped it off the stand, and remembered I didn't put the ramp back on. Hmm, seems my stupidity level is running pretty high today. So now I'm standing next to the bike, the kickstand won't work on the lift and I can't let it go. I end up wedging a roll of tape, a manual, and a wrench under the side stand to hold it up vertical enough that I can manage the rest with one hand while I work myself to the back and put the ramp back on. Then I take it most of the rest of the way off before I hit something on the floor behind the bike and have the same problem, it's half on the ramp and half off, so once again with the roll of tape and manual to hold the bike up while I deal with what's going on behind it. Just keep this in mind in case anybody gets the mistaken idea that I'm as awesome as I try to make myself sound.
Reminds me of when I built an 1100 from the frame up sitting on a milk crate. When I got done I had to think a while to figure out how to get it off the crate.
 
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Discussion Starter #94
It was actually nice today so I snuck in a ride to and a much longer ride from work (on the big Buell). When I got home I hooked the charger up to the wing, color coded and marked the seat heater wires, then tested everything. In hindsight, this is a task better suited for before the seat cover is on and the heaters are glued down. However, all was working appropriately. They're slow to heat, and a bit inconsistent but any heat's better than none. I may end up getting some of these for my other bikes.

Heater wires labled front and rear by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Ambient temp by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Front seat at temp by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Rear seat at temp by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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98°F will feel good on a 38°F day and 40 mph down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #97
Today I figured I'd go (almost) all in and ordered LED blinkers and flasher. Almost because the low fuel light will remain incandescent, all other bulbs on the bike will be LED. Should free up a few magic pixies. I've a (all of the kids, really) son who's ridiculously smarter than I am, so I'll ask him to figure out exactly how much amps the bike uses compared to stock. Also ordered an electronic flasher unit for the blinkers, and some rubber edging for the shelter because it seems like it should have some. Then I kind of accidentally bought a medium sized milling machine, so now I need to clear out a corner of the barn for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #98
Took the license plate bracket out of the evaporust, rinsed it off and sprayed the inside with chain wax to prevent rust. Then when I was just about finished assembling it the ground wire connector broke off, and of course it's not a standard size. Don't care, had one anyway. Cut, stripped, crimped, dielectric greased and reassembled everything.

Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #100
Then I figured I'd address the fact that the neutral light was as bright as the headlight. First I tried a smaller, white LED. That made it dimmer but made it look blue. Then I tried green sharpie over the emitters of the green LED I had in there. Nope. Finally I used UV setting Epoxy to make a lens over the emitters, and lightly scuffed that lens to diffuse the light. Perfect!
Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr
 
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