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today on the way to work my bike stated back fireing and the gauges went hay wire. after getting help by a stranger pushing me off a busy street i tried to start it , it started fine turned off to get gear back on tried to start, bike dead. after checking fuses and connections and trying to find a trailertheprevious owner called and told me about fusible links, found them one blown. i was lucky he had extra in cap .suggestions where to look for cause? i really have appriciated all the help recieved on this site, just need day when dont need bike as transportation to try the ideas.
 

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the cause is likely a loose connection/corosion making the fuse get hot resulting in a blown fuse
 

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saltmar14 wrote:
today on the way to work my bike stated back fireing and the gauges went hay wire. after getting help by a stranger pushing me off a busy street i tried to start it , it started fine turned off to get gear back on tried to start, bike dead. after checking fuses and connections and trying to find a trailertheprevious owner called and told me about fusible links, found them one blown. i was lucky he had extra in cap .suggestions where to look for cause? i really have appriciated all the help recieved on this site, just need day when dont need bike as transportation to try the ideas.
Saltmar, what "fusible link" are you talking about? Is it the 30 AMP dogbone fuse located beneath cover on starter solenoid. This fuse looks likea thin miniature wrench and is held in place by 2 screws (some bikes however have had this fuse replaced by an inline fuse holder). Or is the an inline fuse holder located behing and inboard of battery that had a blown fuse. A pic would help. I'm a bit leery that the PO had the answer and fix ready to go for you-perhaps he had this issue and didn't mention it. Anyway try to give as descriptive of answer that you can.

Also since you are new to the bike a word of warning regarding the stator wire connections. There are 3 yellow wires that run from the engine stator to the voltage regulator/rectifier under the false gas tank. There are several connectors in this 3 wire run that routinely fail and can cause stator damage which requires engine removal to replace. After you solve the 1st problem be sure to deal with this before putting too many miles on bike.

Last,

Welcome to the forum.
 

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I see you have an LTD. Prepare for charging system problems. I won't get into all the details right now, but I consider it a design problem, and so do a couple of professional mechanics I know.

There are things you can do to minimize problems, and one of them is to eliminate all plastic connectors that show the least bit of heat damage. The first one is in front of the battery, and has 3 yellow wires going into and coming out of it. These are the main wires from the stator. Check it. If it is the least bit burned, cut it out and solder the wires together. You will need to splice in some extra wire to make up for the missing connector. Make sure it is the same size or bigger than the yellow wires.

Now remove the fake tank (yes it involves a bit of work, but it needs to be done) and check the TWO white plastic connectors on the regulator. The regulator is on the left side of the frame, just in front of the cruise control unit (the flat round thing with a throttle cable going into and out of it). The regulator is a small metal box with fins on it. There will be 2 connectors. One of them will be just 2 yellow wires. These are 2 of the same yellow wires that were down by the battery, that come from the stator. The other connector will be larger, and has the other yellow wire, 2 green wires, 2 red/white wires, and one black wire. Check both these connectors thoroughly, take them apart and check inside if there is no obvious outside damage. Remember thats three connectors altogether, one by the battery, and 2 at the regulator. If by some strange chance any of them are not burned at all, pack them with dielectric grease and put them back together. But I have yet to hear of one that has survived for 26 years undamaged. Again, if they are burned, cut them out and solder the wires directly together.

Remove the regulator and make sure the mounting surface is not corroded or dirty or rusty. The regulator needs a good ground.

Those "dogbone" fuses actually work pretty well, but they are subject to corrosion, which causes high resistance and heat, which burns them into. The problem is you can't get them just anywhere. I recommend cutting out the entire fuse holder, and soldering in an automotive fuse holder big enough for a 30 amp fuse, and using the 2 prong automotive 30 amp fuses. Carry a few, just in case.


Even when done this way, the regulator is going to run HOT, I mean REALLY HOT. To find out just how hot, start up the engine and let it run for about 10 minutes, before reinstalling the fake gas tank. Then tough the regulator with the tip of your fingers. Be careful not to get burned. I had a blister on my arm where I accidentally touched it. It gets hot enough to burn the insulation off wires, so make sure no wires actually touch the outside of it. Tie them out of the way if necessary.


After I get some other issues with my 1200LTD squared away, I am going to go back to the charging system, and see what I can do to make it run a bit cooler.
 

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wingsam41 , there are two of fuses next to the battery, it was the 30 amp in the larger holder.
 

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JerryH wrote:
I see you have an LTD. Prepare for charging system problems. I won't get into all the details right now, but I consider it a design problem, and so do a couple of professional mechanics I know.

There are things you can do to minimize problems, and one of them is to eliminate all plastic connectors that show the least bit of heat damage. The first one is in front of the battery, and has 3 yellow wires going into and coming out of it. These are the main wires from the stator. Check it. If it is the least bit burned, cut it out and solder the wires together. You will need to splice in some extra wire to make up for the missing connector. Make sure it is the same size or bigger than the yellow wires.

Now remove the fake tank (yes it involves a bit of work, but it needs to be done) and check the TWO white plastic connectors on the regulator. The regulator is on the left side of the frame, just in front of the cruise control unit (the flat round thing with a throttle cable going into and out of it). The regulator is a small metal box with fins on it. There will be 2 connectors. One of them will be just 2 yellow wires. These are 2 of the same yellow wires that were down by the battery, that come from the stator. The other connector will be larger, and has the other yellow wire, 2 green wires, 2 red/white wires, and one black wire. Check both these connectors thoroughly, take them apart and check inside if there is no obvious outside damage. Remember thats three connectors altogether, one by the battery, and 2 at the regulator. If by some strange chance any of them are not burned at all, pack them with dielectric grease and put them back together. But I have yet to hear of one that has survived for 26 years undamaged. Again, if they are burned, cut them out and solder the wires directly together.

Remove the regulator and make sure the mounting surface is not corroded or dirty or rusty. The regulator needs a good ground.

Those "dogbone" fuses actually work pretty well, but they are subject to corrosion, which causes high resistance and heat, which burns them into. The problem is you can't get them just anywhere. I recommend cutting out the entire fuse holder, and soldering in an automotive fuse holder big enough for a 30 amp fuse, and using the 2 prong automotive 30 amp fuses. Carry a few, just in case.


Even when done this way, the regulator is going to run HOT, I mean REALLY HOT. To find out just how hot, start up the engine and let it run for about 10 minutes, before reinstalling the fake gas tank. Then tough the regulator with the tip of your fingers. Be careful not to get burned. I had a blister on my arm where I accidentally touched it. It gets hot enough to burn the insulation off wires, so make sure no wires actually touch the outside of it. Tie them out of the way if necessary.


After I get some other issues with my 1200LTD squared away, I am going to go back to the charging system, and see what I can do to make it run a bit cooler.
Jerry, I keep wondering if you've found that 3rd connector up by the regulator. My SEi had the connector by the battery and Both connectors that pigtail off the regulator hardwired. That third connector up by the regulator can also overheat just like the others and when faulty will cause regulator to run hot. You definately need to investigate this as your regulator sounds as if it is running way too hot. Additionally I have to disagree with the idea of "packing" these connectors with dielectric grease. This grease is non conductive and can exacerbate the condition if too much is used. The idea is not to get the grease directly on the mating surface of the actual conductors within the connector. Rather smear it sparingly and try to avoid packing it into the connector itself. This will keep moisture out but not interfere with any connection. My opinion is that it is best to simply eliminate the connectors entirely. They may last a while but if you do extended riding my guess is they will eventually overheat anyway. These connectors are likely underdesigned as each AC stator wire carries a fair amount of current-last time I checked was around 22 amps AC.
The wires may be capable of handling that much current but it seems just too much for the connectors.

However important the stator connections are they are not his immediate problem. Sounds as though he burned up a fuse in an aftermarket 30 amp fuse holder. It is important to know if the fuse was blown cleanly or if it appeared overheated or melted. Stock setup on the bike has a 30 amp "dogbone' fuse as indicated previously. This fuse is mounted under the side cover on the starter solenoid. It has a tab on this little plastic flap that acts to hold the four wire connector that attaches to the start solenoid. The 4 wires are: 2 smaller wires which are power from start button and ground for coil of start solenoid. 2 Larger wires (red and red/white) that are interrupted by the dogbone. Likely your connector at the solenoid was problematic so the P.O. removed these 2 wires and used an inline fuse holder between them. If fuse was simply blown-verify that it was 30 amp. If overheated then you will need to replace that inline fuse holder with one of better quality.

Hope this all makes sense and helps!
 

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No I have NOT found that third connector. Maybe the LTD doesn't have it? Regulator is definitely running way to hot. I don't understand how it hasn't cooked itself by now. There are a lot of connectors in that area, but none look burned. What does it connect to, what color are the wires, and how many wires are there? I will look for it tonight.
 

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JerryH wrote:
No I have NOT found that third connector. Maybe the LTD doesn't have it? Regulator is definitely running way to hot. I don't understand how it hasn't cooked itself by now. There are a lot of connectors in that area, but none look burned. What does it connect to, what color are the wires, and how many wires are there? I will look for it tonight.
It is possible that the LTD doesn't have it-that's what I'm trying to find out. I will try to delve into the wiring manual later tonight and get more info. The regulators do get hot-just not as hot as u are describing. I will advise tonight.
 

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OK, I'M GOING TO REPLACE THE VOLTAGE REGULATOR AND TRY TO SOLDER THE THREE YELLOW STATOR WIRES TOGETHER BIPASSING THE CONNECTOR.TO DAY WENT FOR A RIDE EVERTHING SEEMED OK,TONITE THE VOLT METER ON BIKE STARTED TO JUMP ALL OVER GETTING READINGS FROM 13-16.5 VOLTS AND LIGHTS CHANGED INTENSITY. DOES ANY ONE KNOW WHERE I CAN ORDER THE PARTS AND HOW TO FIND PART NUMBERS? ALSO WHAT GAUGE THE STATOR WIRES ARE?
 

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Fluctuating voltage readings are usually from a bad regulator but bad wire connections could also be a problem.

Oh and the stator wires are 14gauge but most recommend using 12gauge for the repair, I don't agree but that's just me.:?
 

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is there a difference between oem and oem equivalence? the honda regulator / rec is 270.00 the goldwing cycleparts is 99.00.
 

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saltmar14 wrote:
is there a difference between oem and oem equivalence? the honda regulator / rec is 270.00 the goldwing cycleparts is 99.00.
Just what you want to pay....lol



You can get good reg. with warrenties on ebay for under 100.00

I picked one up from ebay member, hard wired the stator and have not had a problem yet.



Have your battery checked. Mine was over charged with a reg. car charger. The battery took out the reg.

If the battery has gone bad at all (new or used) it will cause problems with the reg.



Kurt
 

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Gone14s wrote:
saltmar14 wrote:
is there a difference between oem and oem equivalence? the honda regulator / rec is 270.00 the goldwing cycleparts is 99.00.
Just what you want to pay....lol



You can get good reg. with warrenties on ebay for under 100.00

I picked one up from ebay member, hard wired the stator and have not had a problem yet.



Have your battery checked. Mine was over charged with a reg. car charger. The battery took out the reg.

If the battery has gone bad at all (new or used) it will cause problems with the reg.



Kurt
Kurt, there a bit more difference than just what you want to pay!! If you don't believe me try an Electrix or Electrosport regulator and see how long they last....



Saltmar14, here's a link to the OEM Shindengen regulator at Regulator Rectifier.comthat I've recomended to several people and it's worked good for them so far. At least they haven't came back at me kicking and screaming that I recomended something that didn't work or last!! :cool:



http://www.regulatorrectifier.com/catalog/1985-Honda-GL1200-GL-1200LTD-Limited-Edition-Regulator-Rectifier



At $129.95 I think it's a deal!!!!!
 

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No problem Don,just having some sport with him.

Kurt
 

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roscoepc , thanks i went ahead and ordered from them. they say it is oem but improved over original. i have false tank off the two yellow wire conector looks smoked. there is supposed to be a goldwing like mine at the local pic a part, will check out when i get transportation.
 

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saltmar14 wrote:
roscoepc , thanks i went ahead and ordered from them. they say it is oem but improved over original. i have false tank off the two yellow wire conector looks smoked. there is supposed to be a goldwing like mine at the local pic a part, will check out when i get transportation.
you have a local picapart with bikes??????????????
 

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sctrucker wrote:
saltmar14 wrote:
roscoepc , thanks i went ahead and ordered from them. they say it is oem but improved over original. i have false tank off the two yellow wire conector looks smoked. there is supposed to be a goldwing like mine at the local pic a part, will check out when i get transportation.
you have a local picapart with bikes??????????????
Im moving.....
 

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I think there's a bike junkyard located on the west side of Bristol, Tn. if any of you are close enough....
 

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I have never seen a " fusible link " on a bike , only cars and trucks . A fusible link looks just like a 5" piece of wire spliced into a wire. They are color coded as per. there amp. rating and are not to be confused with a " inline fuse " which is an actual fuse in series with a wire.
 
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